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Hypertensive Heart Disease News

Does a Little Daily Drinking Really Help the Heart?

Posted 6 days ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Nov. 29, 2016 – Many studies have hinted that alcohol, in moderation, can do a heart good. But new research suggests that moderate drinkers are no more likely than teetotalers to have clear arteries. The scientists looked at almost 2,000 patients who underwent CT angiography – an imaging test that detects "plaques" in heart arteries. Overall, there was no association between people's drinking habits and their odds of showing clogged vessels. The findings stand in contrast to past studies that have linked moderate drinking to a lower risk of heart disease – where plaques build up in the heart arteries and may eventually trigger a heart attack. Researchers said an advantage of the new study is that it used objective measurements. "No prior studies have assessed the relationship between alcohol consumption and the presence of coronary heart disease as depicted by coronary CT ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Hypertension, Heart Disease, Heart Failure, Congestive Heart Failure, Alcohol Dependence, Alcoholism, Hangover, Coronary Artery Disease (CAD), Left Ventricular Dysfunction, Ischemic Heart Disease, Hypertensive Heart Disease, Acute Alcohol Intoxication

3 Keys to Cutting Your Risk of Heart Failure

Posted 6 days ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Nov. 28, 2016 – Middle-aged adults who've avoided obesity, high blood pressure and diabetes are far less likely than others to experience heart failure in their later years, new research reports. Investigators found that a 45-year-old without those three key risk factors has as much as an 86 percent lower risk for heart failure compared with someone with poor control of weight, blood pressure and blood sugar. "This paper provides more evidence to demonstrate the importance of a heart-healthy lifestyle," said study co-author Dr. John Wilkins. He's a cardiologist and assistant professor of medicine and preventive medicine at the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago. Good lifestyle habits can help prevent obesity, high blood pressure and diabetes in many people, "which will substantially reduce their chances of developing cardiovascular disease later in ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, High Blood Pressure, Diabetes, Type 2, Hypertension, Heart Failure, Congestive Heart Failure, Left Ventricular Dysfunction, Diabetes Mellitus, Hypertensive Heart Disease

Strokes Decline in Older Americans, Rise in Young

Posted 11 days ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 23, 2016 – There's a new generation gap in the United States – strokes are increasingly striking young people, and at the same time, stroke rates are dropping in those 55 and older, a new study reports. "People born during what I call the 'Golden Generation,' 1945 to 1954, had lower rates of stroke than those born 20 years before them and also in the 20 years after them," said lead researcher Joel Swerdel. He is a Ph.D. candidate at the Rutgers University School of Public Health in New Jersey. People born during "Generation X" – between 1965 and 1974 – have a 43 percent higher rate of stroke than those born in the Golden Generation, researchers discovered. Strokes primarily occur when a blood clot blocks a blood vessel or artery in the brain, starving the brain of oxygen and killing off brain cells in the affected area. It's the fifth-leading cause of death in the ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Hypertension, Ischemic Stroke, Ischemic Stroke - Prophylaxis, Hypertensive Emergency, Hypertensive Heart Disease

Bonus From Your Blood Pressure Med: Fewer Fractures?

Posted 14 days ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Nov. 21, 2016 – High blood pressure and weakened bones are two big health issues for seniors. Now, new data suggests that one class of drugs might help protect against both. The study of thousands of Veterans Affairs (VA) and Medicare patients found that anti-hypertension meds called thiazide diuretics also seemed to lower odds of a patient suffering a hip or pelvic fracture, compared with people on other high blood pressure medications. The finding made sense to one endocrinologist. "It is well known that thiazide therapy can lower calcium excretion into the urine by as much as 50 percent," said Dr. Caroline Messer, who reviewed the new findings. "This tendency towards a positive calcium balance in the body may [slow] bone loss and reduce fracture risk," explained Messer. She directs the Center for Pituitary and Neuroendocrine Disorders at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City. ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Lisinopril, Hypertension, Amlodipine, Norvasc, Azor, Exforge, Fracture, bone, Lotrel, Hydrochlorothiazide/Lisinopril, Zestril, Tribenzor, Caduet, Amlodipine/Benazepril, Hyponatremia, Zestoretic, Twynsta, Prinivil, Exforge HCT, Compression Fracture of Vertebral Column

Fewer Americans Suffering From Dementia, Study Finds

Posted 14 days ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Nov. 21, 2016 – Here's some good news for America's seniors: Dementia rates have dropped dramatically over the last decade or so, according to a new study. An analysis of responses from a study of more than 10,000 people aged 65 and older found the prevalence of dementia dropped about 24 percent between 2000 and 2012. The reasons for the decline aren't clear, researchers say. But two factors stand out: The participants in 2012 had more years of schooling than those in 2000; and chronic conditions such as high blood pressure and diabetes were being controlled more aggressively. "The decline in dementia risk among older adults that we found in our study – and that an increasing number of other studies around the world have found – does not mean that Alzheimer's and dementia have been solved," said lead researcher Dr. Kenneth Langa. He is a professor of medicine at the ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Diabetes, Type 2, Hypertension, Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Insulin Resistance, Pre-Diabetes, Diabetes Mellitus, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Abnormal Glucose Tolerance, Hypertensive Heart Disease, Lewy Body Dementia

High Blood Pressure Rates Have Doubled Worldwide Since 1975

Posted 19 days ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 16, 2016 – The number of people worldwide with high blood pressure has nearly doubled over the past 40 years, a new study reveals. At the same time, average blood pressure levels are at an all-time low in the United States and other developed nations, the researchers said. "High blood pressure is the leading risk factor for stroke and heart disease, and kills around 7.5 million people worldwide every year. Most of these deaths are experienced in the developing world," said study author Majid Ezzati, a professor at Imperial College, London in England. "Taken globally, high blood pressure is no longer a problem of the Western world or wealthy countries. It is a problem of the world's poorest countries and people," Ezzati added. The overall number of people with high blood pressure ("hypertension") rose from 594 million in 1975 to more than 1 billion in 2015, due to ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, High Blood Pressure, Hypertension, Azor, Exforge, Benicar HCT, Diovan HCT, Hyzaar, Lotrel, Avalide, Hydrochlorothiazide/Lisinopril, Tribenzor, Micardis HCT, Caduet, Ziac, Amlodipine/Benazepril, Tarka, Edarbyclor, Zestoretic, Twynsta

Stressed Childhood Might Raise Risk for High Blood Pressure Later

Posted 20 days ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Nov. 15, 2016 – A stressful childhood might predispose some people to struggle with high blood pressure as adults, a new study suggests. And a second study found that having parents who had high blood pressure at a relatively young age also increased that risk. In the first study, kids exposed to stress were more likely to have later problems regulating their blood pressure, an early warning sign of heart problems to come, the researchers said. "In the subjects in the group without early life stress, their average level of diastolic blood pressure is around 60," said study author Shaoyong Su, an associate professor of pediatrics at Augusta University Medical College of Georgia. "Those exposed to adverse environment may get high as 65. That's quite a big difference." Diastolic blood pressure, the lower number, is how much pressure your blood is exerting between beats. Systolic ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety, Anxiety and Stress, High Blood Pressure, Hypertension, Social Anxiety Disorder, Hypertensive Heart Disease

Sharp Drop in Blood Pressure After Rx May Be Risky for Some Heart Patients

Posted 15 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Nov. 14, 2016 – In some people with high blood pressure, too-steep drops in blood pressure after drug therapy may actually raise their risk of premature death, preliminary findings suggest. Researchers led by Dr. Peter Okin, of Weill Cornell Medicine in New York City, tracked data on nearly 8,000 non-diabetic adults who had high blood pressure. The researchers first looked at patients who had systolic blood pressure (the upper number in a reading) of 164 mm Hg or higher before treatment. Patients who reduced that number to less than 142 mm Hg during treatment were 32 percent more likely to die during the study period than those who lowered it to 152 mm Hg or more during treatment, the findings showed. But the scenario was different if systolic blood pressure was below 164 mm Hg before treatment, according to the report. In these cases, when drug treatment lowered systolic blood ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Lisinopril, Hypertension, Metoprolol, Atenolol, Propranolol, Bystolic, Carvedilol, Ramipril, Bisoprolol, Coreg, Inderal, Enalapril, Benazepril, Sotalol, Toprol-XL, Lopressor, Timolol, Lotrel, Nadolol

Weight-Loss Surgery Tied to Lower Heart Risks

Posted 14 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Nov. 14, 2016 – Weight-loss surgery may significantly reduce obese people's risk of heart failure, a new study indicates. Researchers compared more than 25,800 obese people who had weight-loss (bariatric) surgery with more than 13,700 obese people who tried to lose weight through a program of major lifestyle changes. Both groups had no history of heart failure. Four years after the start of treatment, the weight-loss surgery group had lost more weight, had a nearly 50 percent lower risk of heart failure, and had lower rates of heart rhythm problems, diabetes and high blood pressure than the lifestyle-changes group, the findings showed. Both groups had similar rates of heart attack and death, according to the study, which was scheduled for presentation Monday at the American Heart Association (AHA) annual meeting, in New Orleans. "Our study shows an association between obesity ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, High Blood Pressure, Diabetes, Type 2, Hypertension, Weight Loss, Heart Disease, Insulin Resistance, Pre-Diabetes, Gastric Bypass Surgery, Diabetes Mellitus, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Ischemic Heart Disease, Abnormal Glucose Tolerance, Gastrointestinal Surgery, Hypertensive Heart Disease

Many Kids Still Eating Too Much Salt

Posted 3 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Nov. 3, 2016 – American children's high salt intake puts them at risk for heart disease later in life, a new study warns. Nearly 90 percent of U.S. kids consume more than the recommended amount of salt for their age, researchers from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention discovered. Sodium-heavy breads, pizza, cold cuts, processed snacks and soups are among the major culprits, according to the report. "We already know that nearly all Americans regardless of age, race and gender consume more sodium than is recommended for a healthy diet, and the excess intake is of great concern among particular youths," lead author Zerleen Quader said. Quader is a data analyst in the CDC's Division for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention. The researchers analyzed 2011-2012 data from more than 2,100 children, aged 6 to 18, nationwide. The kids' average salt intake was 3,256 ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, High Blood Pressure, Hypertension, Sodium Chloride, HalfLytely and Bisacodyl, Hyper-Sal, Rhinaris, Dextrose/Sodium Chloride, Saline Nasal Mist, Hypertensive Heart Disease, Potassium Chloride/Sodium Chloride, Ayr Saline Nasal, ENTsol, Thermotabs, Buffered Salt, Pediamist, Little Noses, Sea Soft, Nasal Moist, NasoGel

More Than Half of Americans Have Chronic Health Problem: Study

Posted 3 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 2, 2016 – More than half of Americans have at least one chronic disease, mental illness or problem with drugs or alcohol, according to a new study. "The health of individuals in the U.S.A. is increasingly being defined by complexity and multimorbidity, the co-occurrence of two or more chronic medical conditions," said the study authors, Elizabeth Lee Reisinger Walker and Dr. Benjamin Druss. They emphasized that people with multiple health issues need more access to care and better coordination among their health care providers. The Emory University researchers examined public health records to find out what percentage of U.S. adults have chronic medical conditions, mental illness or substance abuse problems, and how many were also living in poverty. Chronic medical conditions looked at in the study included asthma, cirrhosis, diabetes, heart disease, hepatitis, high ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Bipolar Disorder, High Blood Pressure, Hypertension, Smoking, Heart Disease, Schizophrenia, Smoking Cessation, Angina, Alcohol Dependence, Psychosis, Psychiatric Disorders, Alcoholism, Substance Abuse, Hangover, Drug Psychosis, Ischemic Heart Disease, Cardiovascular Conditions and Disorders, Acute Alcohol Intoxication, Hypertensive Heart Disease

Does Living in Poor Neighborhood Up Stroke Risk?

Posted 2 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Nov. 1, 2016 – People in poor neighborhoods have a higher stroke risk than those in wealthier ones, regardless of race or gender, new research suggests. The study included nearly 25,000 Americans, average age 65, with no history of stroke. During an average follow-up of seven and a half years, 929 of them had a stroke. Women and men of all races in the poorest neighborhoods were more likely to suffer a stroke than those in the richer neighborhoods. This held true even after the researchers adjusted for other factors such as age, race, sex and region of the country. One possible reason is that people in poor neighborhoods are more likely to smoke than those in richer areas. They also have higher rates of high blood pressure and diabetes, which are linked to stroke, according to the researchers at the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB). "Many social and behavioral risk ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Diabetes, Type 2, Hypertension, Ischemic Stroke, High Cholesterol, Insulin Resistance, Pre-Diabetes, Diabetes Mellitus, Ischemic Stroke - Prophylaxis, Hypertensive Heart Disease

Pedal Your Way to Heart Health

Posted 31 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Oct. 31, 2016 – Regular bicycling may lower your risk of heart disease and heart attack, two new studies find. One study looked at thousands of Danes, aged 50 to 65. Those who started cycling and kept with it had a 25 percent lower risk of developing heart disease over 15 years than those who did not cycle, researchers found. Also, Danes who regularly used their bikes for recreation or commuting had 11 to 18 percent fewer heart attacks during a 20-year follow-up, according to the study. The results were published Oct. 31 in the journal Circulation. "Finding time for exercise can be challenging for many people, so clinicians working in the field of cardiovascular risk prevention should consider promoting cycling as a mode of transportation," senior study author Anders Grontved said in a news release from the American Heart Association. He's an associate professor of physical ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, High Blood Pressure, Diabetes, Type 2, Hypertension, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Hypertensive Heart Disease

'White Coat' High Blood Pressure May Signal Trouble in Older People

Posted 31 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Oct. 31, 2016 – So-called "white coat hypertension" is mostly harmless, but in some older people it may indicate a risk for heart disease, a new study suggests. White coat hypertension refers to high blood pressure readings in a doctor's office or other medical setting in people who typically have normal blood pressure. This study included 653 people with white coat hypertension and 653 with normal blood pressure. All of the study volunteers were followed for more than 10 years. During that time, there was no difference in the number of new heart problems in either group for people younger than 60. However, among 92 people aged 60 and older, there were 18 more new heart problem cases among those with white coat hypertension than in those without, according to researchers, led by Dr. Stanley Franklin from University of California, Irvine. Franklin's team said the findings ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Hypertension, Azor, Exforge, Benicar HCT, Diovan HCT, Hyzaar, Lotrel, Avalide, Hydrochlorothiazide/Lisinopril, Micardis HCT, Tribenzor, Caduet, Ziac, Edarbyclor, Amlodipine/Benazepril, Tarka, Zestoretic, Twynsta, Valturna

Can Teens' Heart Rate, Blood Pressure Show Ties to Mental Ills?

Posted 26 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 26, 2016 – A young man's future risk of mental disorders could be tied to higher-than-average heart rate or blood pressure in his late teens, a new European study suggests. Young men with a resting heart rate and blood pressure that's elevated – but still within normal range – seem more likely to develop a wide range of mental illnesses later in their lives, researchers found. These include an increased risk of obsessive-compulsive disorder, schizophrenia and anxiety disorders, the results show. "We are coming to appreciate that psychiatric illnesses are brain diseases, and our central nervous system, which is mediated from our brain, controls autonomic functions," like heart rate and blood pressure, said Dr. Victor Fornari. He is director of the division of child and adolescent psychiatry at Zucker Hillside Hospital in Glen Oaks, N.Y. "We should recognize it would ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Bipolar Disorder, Anxiety and Stress, High Blood Pressure, Obsessive Compulsive Disorder, Hypertension, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Social Anxiety Disorder, Schizophrenia, Borderline Personality Disorder, Psychosis, Psychiatric Disorders, Hypertensive Emergency, Hypertensive Retinopathy, Hypertensive Heart Disease

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