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Hispanics, Blacks Less Likely to Get High Blood Pressure Treatment: Study

Posted 4 days ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Jan. 17, 2017 – Black and Hispanic Americans are less likely than whites to get high blood pressure under control, a new study suggests. Researchers reviewed data from nearly 8,800 adults who took part in the 2003-2012 U.S. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. The study team found that 74 percent of white patients were getting treatment for high blood pressure. For blacks, the treatment rates were slightly lower at 71 percent. For Hispanics, the high blood pressure treatment rate was only 61 percent. Researchers also looked at high blood pressure control rates, defined as readings below 130/80 millimeters of mercury (mm Hg) for those with diabetes or chronic kidney disease, and below 140/90 mm Hg for everyone else. Control rates were 43 percent for whites, 37 percent for blacks and 31 percent for Hispanics, the study reported. Black and Hispanics younger than 60 ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Lisinopril, Hypertension, Losartan, Benicar, Diovan, Ramipril, Cozaar, Micardis, Valsartan, Enalapril, Benazepril, Azor, Exforge, Benicar HCT, Avapro, Atacand, Diovan HCT, Hyzaar, Irbesartan

High Blood Pressure May Not Be All Bad in the Elderly: Study

Posted 4 days ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Jan. 17, 2017 – Developing high blood pressure in very old age may provide some protection from dementia, a new study suggests. In middle age, high blood pressure – also called hypertension – boosts dementia risk later in life, said study lead researcher Maria Corrada. It also raises your risk for heart attack and stroke. But its onset in the eighth or ninth decade of life was linked to lower risk of mental decline in one's 90s, her team found. "Hypertension in the very old is not detrimental for mental health," said Corrada, a professor of neurology and epidemiology at the University of California, Irvine. Several factors may help explain the apparent association between late-life high blood pressure and lower dementia risk, Corrada said. For one, as people age, blood pressure may need to increase to keep blood flowing to the brain for normal functioning. "It's a matter of ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Hypertension, Metoprolol, Atenolol, Losartan, Propranolol, Hydrochlorothiazide, Benicar, Diovan, Dementia, Bystolic, Carvedilol, Alzheimer's Disease, Bisoprolol, Cozaar, Coreg, Micardis, Valsartan, Inderal, Sotalol

Medical Groups Raise Blood Pressure Rx Threshold for Healthy Adults Over 60

Posted 5 days ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Jan. 16, 2017 – Two leading medical organizations are recommending a less aggressive target for the treatment of high blood pressure in adults 60 and older who are otherwise healthy. Traditionally, the threshold for high blood pressure has been set at 140 mmHg systolic blood pressure (the top number in a reading). But the new guideline says doctors should now begin treatment when adults 60 and older have persistent systolic blood pressure that's at or above 150 mmHg, to reduce their risk of heart problems, stroke and death. A less aggressive target like this offers a suitable balance of benefits and potential harms for these patients, according to the new guideline from the American College of Physicians (ACP) and the American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP). Any additional benefit from more aggressive treatment is small, the groups say. Doctors specializing in the cardiac ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Lisinopril, Hypertension, Metoprolol, Heart Disease, Atenolol, Losartan, Propranolol, Benicar, Diovan, Bystolic, Carvedilol, Ramipril, Bisoprolol, Cozaar, Coreg, Micardis, Enalapril, Valsartan, Benazepril

High Blood Pressure Increasing Worldwide

Posted 11 days ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Jan. 10, 2017 – As the number of people around the world with elevated or high blood pressure increases, so do the number of deaths linked to this "silent killer," a new study contends. An international analysis of nearly 9 million people states that the rate of high blood pressure (hypertension) and elevated blood pressure (prehypertension) jumped between 1990 and 2015. "There are almost 900 million people in the world with hypertension, and there are almost 3.5 billion people with elevated blood pressure that doesn't quite meet the definition of hypertension," said study lead author Christopher Murray. He directs the University of Washington's Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation in Seattle. "Blood pressure is the leading cause of premature death and disability in the world," Murray said. Blood pressure is made up of two numbers. The top number, called systolic ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Obesity, Hypertension, Ischemic Stroke, Weight Loss, Heart Attack, Transient Ischemic Attack, Myocardial Infarction, Ischemic Stroke - Prophylaxis, Hypertensive Emergency, Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis, Hypertensive Heart Disease

Study Finds Worrisome Heart Effects Among Some Football Players

Posted 5 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Dec. 5, 2016 – Football players, particularly linemen, may have higher risk of elevated blood pressure and potentially harmful structural changes in the heart, a new study suggests. "Our study confirmed associations between football participation, high blood pressure and cardiac remodeling," said study senior author Dr. Aaron Baggish, an associate director of the Cardiovascular Performance Program at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. Cardiac remodeling refers to changes in the size and shape of the heart. What's worrisome, Baggish said, is that the changes detected in young college athletes may be "maladaptive," or harmful. "This type of change to the heart is concerning in this population of young, otherwise healthy athletes, and raises questions about long-term health implications," Baggish said in a news release from the American College of Cardiology. Using data ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Hypertension, Heart Failure, Congestive Heart Failure, Left Ventricular Dysfunction, Hypertensive Emergency, Hypertensive Heart Disease

Normal Blood Pressure in Clinic May Mask Hypertension

Posted 5 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Dec. 5, 2016 – It's commonly believed that anxiety in the doctor's office causes patients' blood pressure to rise. But for some people, the opposite occurs: Their blood pressure is normal at their medical appointment but elevated the rest of the day. This phenomenon is called "masked hypertension." The best way to uncover it is to wear a small monitoring device for 24 hours, researchers said. For this new study, the researchers had almost 900 healthy, middle-aged patients do just that. The result: Almost 16 percent who had "normal" blood pressure at the clinic learned otherwise after around-the-clock monitoring. "In working individuals who are not being treated for hypertension [high blood pressure], our data show that ambulatory blood pressure is usually higher than clinic blood pressure," said lead researcher Joseph Schwartz. He is a professor of psychiatry and sociology at ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety, High Blood Pressure, Anxiety and Stress, Hypertension, Benicar HCT, Diovan HCT, Hyzaar, Lotrel, Avalide, Hydrochlorothiazide/Lisinopril, Micardis HCT, Edarbyclor, Ziac, Tarka, Amlodipine/Benazepril, Zestoretic, Hypertensive Emergency, Hydrochlorothiazide/Losartan, Atenolol/Chlorthalidone, Atacand HCT

Strokes Decline in Older Americans, Rise in Young

Posted 24 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 23, 2016 – There's a new generation gap in the United States – strokes are increasingly striking young people, and at the same time, stroke rates are dropping in those 55 and older, a new study reports. "People born during what I call the 'Golden Generation,' 1945 to 1954, had lower rates of stroke than those born 20 years before them and also in the 20 years after them," said lead researcher Joel Swerdel. He is a Ph.D. candidate at the Rutgers University School of Public Health in New Jersey. People born during "Generation X" – between 1965 and 1974 – have a 43 percent higher rate of stroke than those born in the Golden Generation, researchers discovered. Strokes primarily occur when a blood clot blocks a blood vessel or artery in the brain, starving the brain of oxygen and killing off brain cells in the affected area. It's the fifth-leading cause of death in the ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Hypertension, Ischemic Stroke, Ischemic Stroke - Prophylaxis, Hypertensive Emergency, Hypertensive Heart Disease

High Blood Pressure Rates Have Doubled Worldwide Since 1975

Posted 16 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 16, 2016 – The number of people worldwide with high blood pressure has nearly doubled over the past 40 years, a new study reveals. At the same time, average blood pressure levels are at an all-time low in the United States and other developed nations, the researchers said. "High blood pressure is the leading risk factor for stroke and heart disease, and kills around 7.5 million people worldwide every year. Most of these deaths are experienced in the developing world," said study author Majid Ezzati, a professor at Imperial College, London in England. "Taken globally, high blood pressure is no longer a problem of the Western world or wealthy countries. It is a problem of the world's poorest countries and people," Ezzati added. The overall number of people with high blood pressure ("hypertension") rose from 594 million in 1975 to more than 1 billion in 2015, due to ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Obesity, Hypertension, Azor, Exforge, Benicar HCT, Diovan HCT, Hyzaar, Lotrel, Avalide, Hydrochlorothiazide/Lisinopril, Tribenzor, Micardis HCT, Caduet, Edarbyclor, Ziac, Tarka, Amlodipine/Benazepril, Zestoretic, Twynsta

Sharp Drop in Blood Pressure After Rx May Be Risky for Some Heart Patients

Posted 15 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Nov. 14, 2016 – In some people with high blood pressure, too-steep drops in blood pressure after drug therapy may actually raise their risk of premature death, preliminary findings suggest. Researchers led by Dr. Peter Okin, of Weill Cornell Medicine in New York City, tracked data on nearly 8,000 non-diabetic adults who had high blood pressure. The researchers first looked at patients who had systolic blood pressure (the upper number in a reading) of 164 mm Hg or higher before treatment. Patients who reduced that number to less than 142 mm Hg during treatment were 32 percent more likely to die during the study period than those who lowered it to 152 mm Hg or more during treatment, the findings showed. But the scenario was different if systolic blood pressure was below 164 mm Hg before treatment, according to the report. In these cases, when drug treatment lowered systolic blood ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Lisinopril, Hypertension, Metoprolol, Atenolol, Propranolol, Bystolic, Carvedilol, Ramipril, Bisoprolol, Coreg, Enalapril, Benazepril, Inderal, Sotalol, Toprol-XL, Lopressor, Timolol, Lotrel, Nadolol

'White Coat' High Blood Pressure May Signal Trouble in Older People

Posted 31 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Oct. 31, 2016 – So-called "white coat hypertension" is mostly harmless, but in some older people it may indicate a risk for heart disease, a new study suggests. White coat hypertension refers to high blood pressure readings in a doctor's office or other medical setting in people who typically have normal blood pressure. This study included 653 people with white coat hypertension and 653 with normal blood pressure. All of the study volunteers were followed for more than 10 years. During that time, there was no difference in the number of new heart problems in either group for people younger than 60. However, among 92 people aged 60 and older, there were 18 more new heart problem cases among those with white coat hypertension than in those without, according to researchers, led by Dr. Stanley Franklin from University of California, Irvine. Franklin's team said the findings ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Hypertension, Azor, Exforge, Benicar HCT, Diovan HCT, Hyzaar, Lotrel, Avalide, Hydrochlorothiazide/Lisinopril, Micardis HCT, Tribenzor, Caduet, Edarbyclor, Ziac, Amlodipine/Benazepril, Tarka, Zestoretic, Twynsta, Hypertensive Emergency

Can Teens' Heart Rate, Blood Pressure Show Ties to Mental Ills?

Posted 26 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 26, 2016 – A young man's future risk of mental disorders could be tied to higher-than-average heart rate or blood pressure in his late teens, a new European study suggests. Young men with a resting heart rate and blood pressure that's elevated – but still within normal range – seem more likely to develop a wide range of mental illnesses later in their lives, researchers found. These include an increased risk of obsessive-compulsive disorder, schizophrenia and anxiety disorders, the results show. "We are coming to appreciate that psychiatric illnesses are brain diseases, and our central nervous system, which is mediated from our brain, controls autonomic functions," like heart rate and blood pressure, said Dr. Victor Fornari. He is director of the division of child and adolescent psychiatry at Zucker Hillside Hospital in Glen Oaks, N.Y. "We should recognize it would ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Bipolar Disorder, High Blood Pressure, Anxiety and Stress, Obsessive Compulsive Disorder, Hypertension, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Social Anxiety Disorder, Schizophrenia, Borderline Personality Disorder, Psychosis, Psychiatric Disorders, Hypertensive Emergency, Hypertensive Retinopathy, Hypertensive Heart Disease

Sound Waves: An Rx for High Blood Pressure, Migraine?

Posted 16 Sep 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Sept. 16, 2016 – A new sound-based therapy appears to reduce blood pressure and ease migraine symptoms, according to a pair of small studies. The therapy initially reads brain activity through scalp sensors. That activity is then converted into a series of audible tones. The tones are then reflected back to the brain through earbuds in a matter of milliseconds, explained Dr. Charles Tegeler, a professor of neurology with Wake Forest School of Medicine in Winston-Salem, N.C. "Your brain gets to listen to the song that it's playing. It gets to look at itself in an acoustic mirror," said Tegeler, who served as senior researcher for both studies. "Somehow that rapid update gives the brain a chance to auto-calibrate, self-optimize, relax and reset," Tegeler said. One study found that 10 men and women achieved significant reductions in their blood pressure after going through an ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Migraine, Hypertension, Migraine Prevention, Migraine Prophylaxis, Hypertensive Emergency, Hypertensive Heart Disease

Tighter Blood Pressure Control Could Save 100,000 U.S. Lives: Study

Posted 15 Sep 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Sept. 15, 2016 – Engaging Americans at high risk for heart disease in aggressive efforts to lower their blood pressure could save more than 100,000 lives a year, a new analysis indicates. Current guidelines recommend a systolic pressure – the top number in a blood pressure reading – of below 140 mm Hg. But a 2015 study from the U.S. National Institutes of Health suggested more lives could be saved if the goal was less than 120 mm Hg. The NIH trial known as SPRINT included adults aged 50 and older with systolic readings of 130 to 180 mm Hg and at high risk of heart disease (but not diabetes or stroke). They had either intensive treatment, with a goal of lowering systolic pressure to less than 120 mm Hg, or standard treatment, with a target of less than 140 mm Hg. The results were so impressive that the NIH halted the trial early. Risk of death from all causes was 27 percent ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Hypertension, Metoprolol, Atenolol, Propranolol, Hydrochlorothiazide, Bystolic, Carvedilol, Bisoprolol, Coreg, Inderal, Sotalol, Azor, Exforge, Benicar HCT, Toprol-XL, Diovan HCT, Lopressor, Hyzaar, Timolol

1 in 4 Medicare Patients Uses Blood Pressure Meds Incorrectly

Posted 13 Sep 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Sept. 13, 2016 – Nearly 5 million Medicare prescription drug enrollees aren't taking their blood pressure medication as directed, increasing their risk of heart attack and stroke, a new U.S. study found. An analysis of 18.5 million Medicare Part D enrollees in 2014 found that 26 percent either skipped doses of their blood pressure medication or stopped taking the drugs entirely, according to the study from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. "That's particularly troubling, because other research indicates that up to 25 percent of new prescriptions for blood pressure medicine are never even filled in the first place," CDC Director Dr. Tom Frieden said. "Of those prescribed those regimens, maybe a quarter don't even start them, and now we're finding that another quarter don't continue them." Heart disease and stroke kill 800,000 people every year in the United ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Hypertension, Ischemic Stroke, Heart Attack, Myocardial Infarction, Ischemic Stroke - Prophylaxis, Hypertensive Emergency, Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis, Post MI Syndrome, Hypertensive Heart Disease

Do Angioplasty Patients Really Need Beta-Blocker Drugs?

Posted 16 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Aug. 16, 2016 – Doctors might be overprescribing beta-blocker medications to heart patients who aren't seriously ill, a new study contends. Beta blockers such as Inderal (propranolol) and Lopressor (metoprolol) reduce blood pressure and control abnormal heart rhythms. They're lifesaving when given to patients who've had a heart attack or have heart failure, said study co-author Dr. Valay Parikh. He is a cardiology fellow with North Shore LIJ-Staten Island University Hospital, in Staten Island, N.Y. But these drugs do not appear to help patients who haven't had a heart attack or have heart failure, even if they did need angioplasty – surgery to clear a blocked artery that caused chest pain, Parikh and his colleagues report. "Beta blocker therapy should be individualized, and these medications should not be given blindly to everyone," Parikh concluded. "They should be properly ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Hypertension, Metoprolol, Atenolol, Heart Attack, Propranolol, Bystolic, Carvedilol, Angina, Bisoprolol, Coreg, Inderal, Sotalol, Toprol-XL, Lopressor, Myocardial Infarction, Timolol, Nadolol, Tenormin, Labetalol

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