Skip to Content

Join the 'Hypertensive Congestive Heart Failure' group to help and get support from people like you.

Hypertensive Congestive Heart Failure News

Yoga Called Good Medicine for High Blood Pressure

Posted 1 day 18 hours ago by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Dec. 8, 2016 – Yoga may help reduce blood pressure in people who are at risk for developing hypertension, a new study finds. "Patients with pre-hypertension [slightly elevated blood pressure] are likely to develop hypertension [high blood pressure] unless they improve their lifestyle," said study author Dr. Ashutosh Angrish. He is a cardiologist at Sir Gangaram Hospital in Delhi, India. "Both pre-hypertension and high blood pressure increase the risk of heart attack, stroke and heart failure," Angrish added. The new study included 60 people who had slightly elevated blood pressure but were otherwise healthy. The participants were randomly assigned to either practice hatha yoga while also making conventional lifestyle changes, or to just make the lifestyle changes (the "control" group). The lifestyle changes included moderate aerobic exercise, eating a healthier diet and ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Hypertension, Benicar HCT, Diovan HCT, Hyzaar, Lotrel, Avalide, Hydrochlorothiazide/Lisinopril, Micardis HCT, Ziac, Edarbyclor, Amlodipine/Benazepril, Tarka, Zestoretic, Atacand HCT, Atenolol/Chlorthalidone, Hydrochlorothiazide/Losartan, Hydrochlorothiazide/Valsartan, Lopressor HCT, Accuretic

Tighter Blood Pressure Control Could Save 100,000 U.S. Lives: Study

Posted 15 Sep 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Sept. 15, 2016 – Engaging Americans at high risk for heart disease in aggressive efforts to lower their blood pressure could save more than 100,000 lives a year, a new analysis indicates. Current guidelines recommend a systolic pressure – the top number in a blood pressure reading – of below 140 mm Hg. But a 2015 study from the U.S. National Institutes of Health suggested more lives could be saved if the goal was less than 120 mm Hg. The NIH trial known as SPRINT included adults aged 50 and older with systolic readings of 130 to 180 mm Hg and at high risk of heart disease (but not diabetes or stroke). They had either intensive treatment, with a goal of lowering systolic pressure to less than 120 mm Hg, or standard treatment, with a target of less than 140 mm Hg. The results were so impressive that the NIH halted the trial early. Risk of death from all causes was 27 percent ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Hypertension, Metoprolol, Atenolol, Propranolol, Hydrochlorothiazide, Bystolic, Carvedilol, Bisoprolol, Coreg, Inderal, Sotalol, Azor, Exforge, Benicar HCT, Toprol-XL, Lopressor, Diovan HCT, Hyzaar, Timolol

Could Spuds Be Bad for Blood Pressure?

Posted 18 May 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, May 17, 2016 – Potatoes are a popular staple of the American diet, but eating too many – whether boiled, baked, mashed or fried – may raise the risk for high blood pressure, a new study suggests. Consuming four or more servings of potatoes a week was linked with an increased risk for high blood pressure – 11 percent for baked, boiled or mashed and 17 percent for fried – compared with eating less than one serving a month. Surprisingly, potato chips didn't appear to increase the risk, the Harvard researchers reported. "We hope that our study continues the conversation about potatoes and the risk of hypertension and other diseases," said lead researcher Dr. Lea Borgi, of the renal division at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston. But one dietitian not involved with the study suggested the blame shouldn't rest with potatoes, but with the add-ons people put on their spuds – ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Hypertension, Hypertensive Congestive Heart Failure, Hypertensive Heart Disease

Smartphone Blood-Pressure 'App' Often Wrong, Study Finds

Posted 2 Mar 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, March 2, 2016 – A popular "app" that uses your smartphone to check your blood pressure is inaccurate, missing high blood pressure readings in four out of every five patients tested, researchers report. Instant Blood Pressure promises to provide an estimated blood pressure reading if users place their smartphone on the left side of their chest while placing their index finger on the phone's camera, said lead researcher Dr. Timothy Plante, an internist with Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore. But close to 80 percent of people with clinically high blood pressure, defined as 140/90, showed normal blood pressure with the app, his team found. "If someone with high blood pressure is using Instant Blood Pressure to follow their blood pressure at home, more times than not it's going to tell them they're fine," Plante said. The $4.99 app is no longer for sale on ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Hypertension, Intraocular Hypertension, Hypertensive Emergency, Hypertensive Congestive Heart Failure, Hypertensive Heart Disease

Physically Demanding Job, High Blood Pressure a Bad Mix for Women

Posted 15 Feb 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Feb. 15, 2016 – Having a physically demanding job and high blood pressure may triple a woman's risk of heart disease, a new study contends. Researchers looked at more than 12,000 female nurses in Denmark, and found that those with high blood pressure and highly active jobs were much more likely to develop heart disease than those with normal blood pressure and moderately active jobs. "Previous research has shown that men and women with physically demanding jobs have an increased risk of heart disease," said study author Karen Allesoe, a Ph.D. student at the University of Southern Denmark. "The two risk factors appear to work together, resulting in an even greater incidence of heart disease," Allesoe said. "To our knowledge, this has not been shown before among women." However, the study only showed an association for heart disease risk, not a cause-and-effect relationship. The ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Lisinopril, Hypertension, Losartan, Benicar, Diovan, Ramipril, Cozaar, Enalapril, Micardis, Valsartan, Benazepril, Azor, Benicar HCT, Exforge, Avapro, Atacand, Diovan HCT, Hyzaar, Irbesartan

Out-of-Shape Teens May Face High Blood Pressure Later

Posted 19 Jan 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Jan. 19, 2016 – Teenagers who are either overweight or have low fitness levels face a heightened risk of developing high blood pressure by middle age, a large new study finds. People who were both heavy and out of shape in their teens showed the biggest risk, researchers reported Jan. 19 in JAMA Internal Medicine. But even thin teens were at risk of future blood pressure problems if their fitness levels were low. And high blood pressure is serious, raising the risk of stroke, heart disease, kidney disease and premature death, the researchers noted. Experts said the findings – based on more than 1.5 million Swedish men followed for 26 years – drive home a few major points. One is that physical activity matters, regardless of your weight. And that goes beyond blood pressure, said Dr. Carl "Chip" Lavie, medical director of cardiac rehabilitation and prevention at Ochsner ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, High Blood Pressure, Hypertension, Weight Loss, Hypertensive Emergency, Hypertensive Heart Disease, Hypertensive Congestive Heart Failure

Newer Blood Pressure Drugs as Good as Older Ones: Study

Posted 4 Jan 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Jan. 4, 2016 – Newer blood pressure drugs are as safe and effective as older medications, new research suggests. Scientists at the NYU Langone Medical Center in New York City said their findings settle a longstanding debate about which of two types blood-pressure lowering medications studied are better. An analysis of 106 randomized trials involving more than 250,000 patients examined the effects of newer angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) and older angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors. Although ACE inhibitors were developed 10 years earlier, both types of drugs showed similar effects in the analysis, challenging previous findings that suggest ACE inhibitors have greater benefits. According to the new analysis, published online Jan. 4 in the Mayo Clinic Proceedings, the only difference between the medications is that ARBs are more easily tolerated. "There has been ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Lisinopril, Hypertension, Losartan, Benicar, Diovan, Ramipril, Cozaar, Enalapril, Micardis, Valsartan, Benazepril, Avapro, Atacand, Irbesartan, Perindopril, Telmisartan, Candesartan, Edarbi, Quinapril

Slow Progress on Curbing Wasteful, 'Low-Value' Health Care Practices: Study

Posted 12 Oct 2015 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Oct. 12, 2015 – As health care budgets get tighter across the United States, there's been a renewed focus on ridding the system of procedures that give patients little real benefit for the time and money spent. Now, a new study suggests that the use of at least three health care services deemed to be "low value" have dropped over the past few years. However, there were only slight decreases – and even increases – in the use of many other low-value services, the report found. In 2009, the National Physicians Alliance piloted an effort called the Choosing Wisely Campaign, aimed at cutting overuse and waste out of the health care system. The campaign lists hundreds of widely used medical practices and procedures that experts say are of little clinical good to patients. In the new study, a team led by Abiy Agiro, of HealthCore in Wilmington, Del., examined seven health services ... Read more

Related support groups: Back Pain, High Blood Pressure, Hypertension, Ibuprofen, Naproxen, Sciatica, Advil, Heart Failure, Congestive Heart Failure, Aleve, Renal Failure, Motrin, Chronic Kidney Disease, Human Papilloma Virus, Vicoprofen, Advil PM, Naprosyn, Left Ventricular Dysfunction, Advil Cold and Sinus, Treximet

Including Pharmacist on Medical Team May Aid Blood Pressure Control

Posted 7 Aug 2015 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Aug. 7, 2015 – Pharmacists can play an important role in helping patients control high blood pressure, a new study finds. Researchers followed 625 racially and ethnically diverse Americans with uncontrolled high blood pressure who were seen at 32 medical offices in 15 states. The patients were either cared for by a doctor only, or by a medical team that included a pharmacist. "Clinical pharmacists were able to contribute to the care team by tailoring blood pressure medications for each patient and spent extra time educating patients on how to decrease their blood pressure," study corresponding author Tyler Gums, a postdoctoral researcher in the University of Iowa College of Pharmacy, said in a university news release. High blood pressure increases the likelihood of heart disease and stroke, two of the leading causes of death for Americans, the study authors noted. The ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Hypertension, Azor, Exforge, Benicar HCT, Diovan HCT, Hyzaar, Lotrel, Avalide, Intraocular Hypertension, Hydrochlorothiazide/Lisinopril, Maxzide, Dyazide, Micardis HCT, Ziac, Hydrochlorothiazide/Triamterene, Edarbyclor, Amlodipine/Benazepril, Tarka, Zestoretic

Big Swings in Blood Pressure Could Spell Trouble

Posted 27 Jul 2015 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, July 27, 2015 – Wide blood pressure fluctuations may signal an increased risk of heart disease and early death, researchers say. The large study of people taking blood pressure medication found that variations of more than 14 mm Hg in systolic blood pressure readings between doctor visits was linked to a 25 percent increased risk of heart failure. Systolic blood pressure is the top number in a blood pressure reading. "Patients should have their blood pressure controlled," said lead researcher Paul Muntner, a professor of epidemiology at the University of Alabama School of Public Health at Birmingham. "They should be aware that their blood pressure changes, and if there is a lot of variation, they might want to talk with their doctor about why it's changing." These variations may be a sign of increasing damage to the arteries, particularly stiffening, Muntner said. About one in ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Hypertension, Azor, Exforge, Benicar HCT, Diovan HCT, Hyzaar, Lotrel, Avalide, Hydrochlorothiazide/Lisinopril, Maxzide, Dyazide, Micardis HCT, Tribenzor, Caduet, Ziac, Hydrochlorothiazide/Triamterene, Tarka, Edarbyclor, Amlodipine/Benazepril

Deaths From High Blood Pressure Should Plummet Under 'Obamacare': Study

Posted 9 Jul 2015 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, July 9, 2015 – U.S. deaths from blood pressure-related diseases are expected to drop substantially during the coming decades because of improved health coverage provided by the Affordable Care Act, a new study reports. Increased treatment of high blood pressure under the health-care legislation, commonly known as "Obamacare," will save the lives of 95,000 to 222,000 non-elderly adults by the year 2050, researchers estimate. That's up to 6,000 people a year who otherwise would die from heart disease. By 2050, there also could be 408,000 fewer cases of heart disease and stroke among the 55 million young and middle-age Americans who have high blood pressure, the researchers found. Those numbers are based solely on patients' increased access to blood pressure medication as a result of the Affordable Care Act, said study lead author Suhui Li. She is an assistant professor of ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Hypertension, Ischemic Stroke, Heart Failure, Congestive Heart Failure, Left Ventricular Dysfunction, Intracranial Hemorrhage, Hypertensive Congestive Heart Failure, Hypertensive Heart Disease

Even Slightly Elevated Blood Pressure May Pose Problems for Young Adults

Posted 22 Jun 2015 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, June 22, 2015 – Young adults with slightly elevated blood pressure may be at risk of heart problems later in life, according to a new study. Researchers cautioned that blood pressure on the high end of what's considered "normal" should be addressed early on to protect heart health for the future. "Our findings provide further support for the importance of good risk factor control early in life," said study lead author Dr. Joao Lima, from the cardiology division at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. "Many participants were not hypertensive at the beginning of the study; however, chronic exposure to higher blood pressure, even within what is considered the normal range, is associated with cardiac dysfunction 25 years later," Lima said in a news release from the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, where the study was published June 22. Researchers followed ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Hypertension, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Hypertensive Congestive Heart Failure, Hypertensive Heart Disease

One-Third of Americans Have Dangerous Mix of Heart Risk Factors

Posted 19 May 2015 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, May 19, 2015 – More than one-third of U.S. adults have a combination of health problems collectively known as metabolic syndrome that increase the risk of heart disease and diabetes, according to new research. What's worse, the researchers found the rate of metabolic syndrome increases dramatically with age. Almost half of people 60 or older in the United States have metabolic syndrome, the study found. "That's concerning, because we know the population of the U.S. is aging," said senior author Dr. Robert Wong, an assistant clinical professor at University of California, San Francisco. "I think it will potentially place a huge burden on our health care system." Metabolic syndrome is a "perfect storm" of conditions that include high blood pressure, abnormal cholesterol levels, increased levels of blood sugar, and a wider waist circumference, Wong said. Medical experts are ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Diabetes, Type 2, Hypertension, Heart Disease, High Cholesterol, Lipitor, Simvastatin, Crestor, Atorvastatin, Pravastatin, Niacin, Angina, Insulin Resistance, Zocor, Niaspan, Lovastatin, Pre-Diabetes, Vytorin, Rosuvastatin, Hypertriglyceridemia

Hormone Reduces Mortality in Heart Patients With High BP

Posted 29 Mar 2009 by Drugs.com

SUNDAY, March 29 – The hormone relaxin reduces shortness of breath and cardiovascular death in people with heart failure who also have high blood pressure, according to a phase 2 trial conducted in eight countries. The study included 234 people who, within a few hours of arriving at a hospital, were randomly assigned to receive an intravenous infusion of a placebo or varying doses of relaxin – 10, 30 100 or 250 micrograms/kilogram (µ/kg) – a day. Shortness of breath improved in 40 percent of those who were given 30 µ/kg, compared with 23 percent of those who received the placebo. After 60 days, fewer people given 30 µ/kg of relaxin had died from a cardiovascular cause or had to be readmitted to the hospital because of heart or kidney failure than in the placebo group: 2.6 percent compared with 17.2 percent. After 180 days, there were no cardiovascular deaths in the relaxin group at th ... Read more

Related support groups: Hypertensive Congestive Heart Failure

Ask a Question

Further Information

Related Condition Support Groups

Hypertensive Heart Disease