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Hypersecretory Conditions News

Could Common Heartburn Drugs Up Stroke Risk?

Posted 15 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Nov. 15, 2016 – A popular category of heartburn medications – including Nexium, Prevacid, Prilosec and Protonix – may increase your risk of stroke, a new study suggests. Known as proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), these drugs increased people's overall stroke risk by 21 percent, said study lead author Dr. Thomas Sehested. However, the risk appears to be driven by people who take high doses, added Sehested, research director at the Danish Heart Foundation in Copenhagen. "People treated with a low dose of PPIs did not have a high risk of stroke," he said. "Those treated with the highest doses of PPIs had the highest risk of stroke." The extent of risk also depends on the specific PPI taken. At the highest dose, stroke risk ranged from 30 percent for lansoprazole (Prevacid) to 94 percent for pantoprazole (Protonix), the researchers said. Takeda Pharmaceutical, the maker of ... Read more

Related support groups: GERD, Heart Disease, Ischemic Stroke, Omeprazole, Nexium, Dementia, Prilosec, Protonix, Indigestion, Zantac, Alzheimer's Disease, Pantoprazole, Ranitidine, Dexilant, Lansoprazole, Prevacid, Transient Ischemic Attack, Pepcid, Barrett's Esophagus, Aciphex

Health Tip: Is it Indigestion?

Posted 6 Jun 2016 by Drugs.com

-- If you've eaten too much or indulged in a food that's greasy, fatty or spicy, you may have an uncomfortable feeling known as indigestion. Here are common symptoms, courtesy of the Cleveland Clinic: A burning sensation in the stomach or upper abdomen. An acidic taste in the mouth. Pain in the abdomen. Occasional diarrhea. Bloatedness or gassiness. Vomiting or nausea. Growling stomach. Read more

Related support groups: GERD, Omeprazole, Nexium, Prilosec, Protonix, Indigestion, Zantac, Pantoprazole, Ranitidine, Dexilant, Lansoprazole, Prevacid, Pepcid, Tums, Milk of Magnesia, Aciphex, Caltrate, Duodenitis/Gastritis, Famotidine, Heartburn Relief

Health Tip: Talk to Your Doctor About Heartburn

Posted 31 May 2016 by Drugs.com

-- Your doctor can suggest ways to cope with heartburn, but it's up to you to start the conversation. The American Academy of Family Physicians suggests: Ask about recommended over-the-counter heartburn medications. Discuss possible causes and triggers of your heartburn, and what you can do to manage it. Talk about lifestyle changes that you can make. Ask about other health conditions that could be causing your heartburn. Discuss your favorite foods and whether they may be contributing to your heartburn. Read more

Related support groups: GERD, Indigestion, Duodenitis/Gastritis, Erosive Gastritis, Hypersecretory Conditions

Could a Low-Risk Surgery Help Your Chronic Heartburn?

Posted 30 Mar 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, March 29, 2016 – A minimally invasive surgery to treat chronic heartburn is safer than generally believed, and could be a desirable alternative to long-term use of acid reflux medications, new research indicates. Scientists found the death rate following so-called laparoscopic fundoplication surgery for gastroesophageal reflux disease, or GERD, was far lower than the 1 percent often quoted. Experts contended the surgery might be underutilized, especially in light of increasing safety concerns about acid reflux drugs. "One of the main arguments against surgery when choosing between [drug] and surgical treatment for severe GERD is the risk of mortality," said study author Dr. John Maret-Ouda. He is a physician and doctoral student in upper gastrointestinal surgery at the Karolinska Institute in Sweden. But, "this study found only one death associated with [this surgery] among ... Read more

Related support groups: GERD, Indigestion, Gastrointestinal Disorders, Endoscopy, Barrett's Esophagus, Duodenitis/Gastritis, Gastric Bypass Surgery, Erosive Gastritis, Gastrointestinal Surgery, Hypersecretory Conditions, Duodenitis/Gastritis with Hemorrhage

Frequent Heartburn May Signal More Serious Digestive Problem

Posted 29 Nov 2015 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Nov. 26, 2015 – Every Thanksgiving, lots of people loosen their belts and reach for antacids to quell an overstuffed tummy. But for some, turkey day is just another day of severe or persistent heartburn, and that chronic digestive trouble may be a sign of a condition called gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), an expert says. In GERD, the contents of the stomach repeatedly flow back into the esophagus. This causes symptoms such as chronic heartburn, regurgitation, difficulty swallowing, sore throat and morning hoarseness, explained Nancy Norton, president and founder of the International Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders. "The symptoms of GERD can seem so common that many people do not consult with health care providers or mention them during routine exams," Norton said in a foundation news release. "When symptoms often occur two or more times a week, or ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, GERD, Weight Loss, Indigestion, Barrett's Esophagus, Duodenitis/Gastritis, Erosive Gastritis, Hypersecretory Conditions, Laryngopharyngeal Reflux

Health Tip: Identifying Symptoms of GERD

Posted 24 Jun 2015 by Drugs.com

-- Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) occurs when stomach acids back up into the esophagus. The U.S. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases mentions these symptoms: Having heartburn. Tasting stomach acid or food in the back of the mouth. Having bad breath. Feeling nauseated, or vomiting. Having difficulty breathing or swallowing. Wearing of tooth enamel. Read more

Related support groups: GERD, Indigestion, Helicobacter Pylori Infection, Barrett's Esophagus, Duodenitis/Gastritis, Erosive Gastritis, NSAID-Induced Ulcer Prophylaxis, Hypersecretory Conditions

Popular Heartburn Meds Linked to Higher Risk of Heart Attack

Posted 10 Jun 2015 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, June 10, 2015 – People who use certain heartburn drugs for a long period of time may have a slightly heightened risk of suffering a heart attack, a new study suggests. Using medical records from nearly 300,000 U.S. adults with acid reflux disease (commonly called heartburn), researchers found that the risk of heart attack was slightly elevated among those using proton pump inhibitors. Proton pump inhibitors are a group of acid-suppressing drugs that include brand-names such as Prevacid, Prilosec and Nexium. In 2009, they were the third most commonly used type of drug in the United States, the researchers said. The study, funded by the U.S. National Institutes of Health, does not prove the drugs cause heart attack. And experts were divided over what to make of the connection. Another class of heartburn drug – so-called H2-blockers – was not linked to any increase in heart ... Read more

Related support groups: GERD, Omeprazole, Nexium, Prilosec, Protonix, Indigestion, Pantoprazole, Dexilant, Lansoprazole, Prevacid, Aciphex, Duodenitis/Gastritis, Rabeprazole, Esomeprazole, Zegerid, Prilosec OTC, Prevacid SoluTab, Dexlansoprazole, Kapidex, Erosive Gastritis

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