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Related terms: Cancer, Hodgkin's Lymphoma, Hodgkin's Disease, Lymphoma, Hodgkin's

DNA Sequencing May Lead to Personalized Cancer Treatment

Posted 9 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 9, 2016 – DNA sequencing may help personalize treatment for people with lymphoma, a new study suggests. By analyzing small bits of DNA in the blood, researchers at Stanford University School of Medicine said they could determine the cancer's subtype. They said they could also identify mutations that might make treatment less effective or worsen a patient's prognosis. The study authors said their findings add to growing evidence that noninvasive, blood-based biopsies may help detect cancer earlier by tracking its evolution. They said this test may also significantly change how the disease is treated. "Now we can identify the subtype of the tumor, watch how it changes over time and begin to tailor our chemotherapy choices based on the presence or absence of specific mutations," said study co-senior author Dr. Ash Alizadeh, an assistant professor of medicine/oncology. ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma, Follicular Lymphoma, Cutaneous T-cell Lymphoma, Hodgkin's Lymphoma, Burkitt Lymphoma, Diagnosis and Investigation, Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma, Mantle Cell Lymphoma, Conjunctival Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue Lymphoma

More Cancer Patients Gaining From Immune-Based Treatments

Posted 20 Sep 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Sept. 20, 2016 – A leading cancer group says more Americans are benefiting from immunotherapy – a relatively new treatment approach that helps the immune system target and destroy cancer cells. "The promise of immunotherapy for cancer therapy has never been greater, and the opportunity to make significant progress in this critical area is real," said Dr. Nancy Davidson, president of the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR). The AACR issued the news on immunotherapy as part of its 2016 Cancer Progress Report. As the group explained, more types of cancer are being successfully treated with immunotherapy. This treatment involves adding new cancer-fighting cells to the body or adding new elements, such as antibodies and proteins, to help the immune system fight cancer. In August 2015, one class of immunotherapy drugs – called checkpoint inhibitors – was approved for ... Read more

Related support groups: Lung Cancer, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Melanoma, Melanoma - Metastatic, Bladder Cancer, Opdivo, Head and Neck Cancer, Keytruda, Hodgkin's Lymphoma, Tecentriq, Nivolumab, Pembrolizumab, Atezolizumab

Scans May Spare Some Hodgkin Lymphoma Patients From Chemo

Posted 23 Jun 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, June 23, 2016 – A certain type of medical scan can be used to help spare some Hodgkin lymphoma patients from the severe side effects of chemotherapy, a new study suggests. Researchers found that PET imaging can identify patients whose Hodgkin lymphoma will likely respond better to treatment, and therefore require less intensive chemotherapy. "The good news is that the majority of people diagnosed with Hodgkin lymphoma can be cured – in this trial more than 95 percent of patients are alive after three years. But we worry about the long-term side effects from the treatments we use," study leader Peter Johnson, a professor of medical oncology at the University of Southampton in England, said in a university news release. "As we've done in this trial, personalizing treatment based on how well it works is a major development for patients with Hodgkin lymphoma, and sets a new ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Hodgkin's Lymphoma, Diagnosis and Investigation, Bleomycin, Blenoxane, Body Imaging

Opdivo (nivolumab) FDA Approved for the Treatment of Hodgkin Lymphoma

Posted 18 May 2016 by Drugs.com

PRINCETON, N.J., May 17, 2016 --(BUSINESS WIRE)--Bristol-Myers Squibb Company (NYSE:BMY) today announced the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved Opdivo (nivolumab) for the treatment of patients with classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL) who have relapsed or progressed after autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (auto-HSCT) and post-transplantation brentuximab vedotin.1 This accelerated approval is based on overall response rate. Continued approval for this indication may be contingent upon verification and description of clinical benefit in confirmatory trials. This first approval of a PD-1 inhibitor for cHL patients who have relapsed or progressed after auto-HSCT and post-transplantation brentuximab vedotin is based on a combined analysis of data from the Phase 2 CheckMate -205 and the Phase 1 CheckMate -039 trials.1 Based on this analysis (n=95), Opdivo ... Read more

Related support groups: Opdivo, Hodgkin's Lymphoma, Nivolumab

FDA Medwatch Alert: BiCNU (carmustine for injection): FDA Alert - Counterfeit Product Discovered in Some Foreign Countries

Posted 16 May 2016 by Drugs.com

ISSUE: FDA is informing health care professionals that a counterfeit version of the FDA approved cancer drug, BiCNU (carmustine for injection) 100 mg, has been detected in some foreign countries. There is no indication at this time that counterfeit BiCNU has entered the legitimate U.S. drug supply chain and no indication that any U.S. patients have received counterfeit BiCNU. See the FDA Alert for more information, including product photos and affected lot numbers. BACKGROUND: The authentic product is approved to treat different types of brain cancer, multiple myeloma, and lymphoma (Hodgkin’s and non-Hodgkin’s). BiCNU is manufactured by Emcure Pharmaceuticals Ltd. and distributed in the United States by Heritage Pharmaceuticals Inc. BiCNU is available as a vial of BiCNU and dehydrated alcohol co-packaged together. While the NDC on the outer package of the authentic and counterfeit ver ... Read more

Related support groups: Brain Tumor, Multiple Myeloma, Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma, Glioblastoma Multiforme, Hodgkin's Lymphoma, Malignant Glioma, BiCNU

Young Black, Hispanic Hodgkin Lymphoma Patients Face Worse Outcomes: Study

Posted 3 Feb 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 3, 2016 – Hodgkin lymphoma is a form of cancer that starts in white blood cells is often curable. But, poor black and Hispanic young people are less likely to survive the disease than their white peers, a new study shows. "This study identifies vulnerable subgroups of young Hodgkin lymphoma patients at higher risk of dying from their disease, and points to disparities in treatment delivery and follow-up care as likely contributing factors," said study author Theresa Keegan. She is an associate professor in the division of hematology and oncology at the University of California, Davis. "Identifying and reducing barriers to recommended treatment and follow-up care is critical to improving survival for all patients," Keegan said in a university news release. She conducted the research while at the Cancer Prevention Institute of California. For the study, researchers ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Hodgkin's Lymphoma

Lymphoma Survivors May Not Get All Recommended Follow-Up Care

Posted 15 Jan 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Jan. 15, 2016 – Some teen and young adult survivors of Hodgkin lymphoma do not receive all the recommended follow-up care, a new study finds. The study included 354 survivors in California who were diagnosed between ages 15 and 39, and followed for an average of six years. Within the first year, 52 percent of the survivors did not receive all recommended care outlined in the National Comprehensive Cancer Network guidelines. But within five years after completing treatment, 96 percent of the survivors had recommended visits (at least one a year) with an oncologist and 70 percent had recommended laboratory testing, according the study authors. The study is scheduled for presentation Friday at an American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) meeting in San Francisco. The findings should be viewed as preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed journal. Hodgkin lymphoma, a cancer ... Read more

Related support groups: Lymphoma, Hodgkin's Lymphoma

Fewer Childhood Cancer Survivors Dying From 'Late' Effects

Posted 13 Jan 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 13, 2016 – Fewer childhood cancer survivors are dying years later from lingering effects of the treatment that conquered their cancer, a new study finds. Experts called the report, published in the Jan. 14 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine, "very good news." "The findings substantiate what experts in the field have hoped would be true," said lead researcher Dr. Gregory Armstrong, of St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, in Memphis, Tenn. Survival rates from many childhood cancers are high, but survivors still face what doctors call "late effects" – health problems that develop months to years after the cancer treatment has ended. Among U.S. children who survived cancer back in the 1970s and '80s, 18 percent died within the next 25 years, Armstrong said. Sometimes, the initial cancer comes back. Often though, the health issues are related to the very ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Methotrexate, Fluorouracil, Xeloda, Hydroxyurea, Mercaptopurine, Hydrea, Carboplatin, Cisplatin, Cytoxan, Dacogen, Cyclophosphamide, Temodar, Bendamustine, Treanda, Oxaliplatin, Gemzar, Capecitabine, Hodgkin's Lymphoma, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

Childhood Cancer Tied to Raised Risk for Other Ills in Adult Life

Posted 11 Nov 2015 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 11, 2015 – Childhood cancer survivors are at increased risk for diabetes and other autoimmune diseases, a new study suggests. "Cure is no longer a sufficient goal in childhood cancer care," the researchers wrote. "As the vast majority of these patients survive, attention must be paid to their long-term quality of life and health challenges." In the study, the investigators analyzed data from more than 20,000 adults in Denmark, Iceland and Sweden, who had cancer before the age of 20 and survived for at least one year, and compared them to nearly 126,000 adults who did not have childhood cancer. Over an average follow-up of 15 to 19 years, 3.6 percent of childhood cancer survivors were treated in a hospital at least once for an autoimmune disease. That rate is 40 percent higher than among the adults who did not have childhood cancer, according to Dr. Anna Sallfors ... Read more

Related support groups: Diabetes, Type 2, Cancer, Leukemia, Autoimmune Disorders, Brain Tumor, Hodgkin's Lymphoma

Young Cancer Survivors Often Develop New Malignancies

Posted 6 Oct 2015 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Oct. 6, 2015 – Teen and young adult cancer survivors are at increased risk for other cancers later in life, a new study reveals. Researchers analyzed U.S. National Cancer Institute data on people who survived cancers before age 40. They had the most common types of cancers in that age group: leukemia, lymphoma, testicular, ovarian, thyroid, breast, soft tissue and bone cancers. "This is a patient demographic that has been largely overlooked," said senior study author Dr. Robert Goldsby, a professor of pediatrics at the University of California, San Francisco Benioff Children's Hospital. Over 30 years, nearly 14 percent of the survivors were diagnosed with another, different type of cancer. On average, the second cancer occurred within 15 years. Compared to people in the general population, patients successfully treated for cancer between ages 15 and 39 were nearly 60 percent ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Breast Cancer, Hairy Cell Leukemia, Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML), Lymphoma, Basal Cell Carcinoma, Melanoma, Skin Cancer, Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL), Ovarian Cancer, Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Stomach Cancer, Cutaneous T-cell Lymphoma, Hodgkin's Lymphoma, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Soft Tissue Sarcoma, Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia, Burkitt Lymphoma

Hodgkin's Lymphoma Survivors Face Higher Long-Term Heart Risks

Posted 27 Apr 2015 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, April 27, 2015 – While treatment for Hodgkin's lymphoma can beat back the once-deadly cancer, it may also render patients vulnerable to heart disease decades later, a new study shows. "Physicians and patients should be aware of the persistently increased risk of cardiovascular diseases throughout life," a team led by Flora van Leeuwen of the Netherlands Cancer Institute in Amsterdam, wrote in the report published online April 27 in JAMA Internal Medicine. According to the American Cancer Society, more than 9,000 people are diagnosed with the blood cancer known as Hodgkin's lymphoma each year. While the disease is now highly treatable, more than 1,100 Americans still die from the illness annually. The disease typically strikes early in life, and is most common in people in their 20s, the society said. Many patients with Hodgkin's lymphoma recover from their illness, and more ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Hodgkin's Lymphoma

New Drug May Help Keep Hodgkin Lymphoma at Bay

Posted 18 Mar 2015 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, March 18, 2015 – An FDA-approved drug doubled the amount of time that patients with Hodgkins lymphoma survived without any progression in their disease, a new study shows. All of the patients also received stem cell therapy along with the drug, called brentuximab vedotin. While the results are encouraging, doctors may never know if the drug is actually lengthening patients' lives, said Dr. Owen O'Connor, director of the Center for Lymphoid Malignancies at Columbia University Medical Center in New York City. That's because brentuximab is fast becoming standard care for all patients with Hodgkin lymphoma who've relapsed after stem cell transplant, he said. So, a trial comparing the survival of patients who got the drug against those who did not might never be feasible, due to ethical concerns. O'Connor was not involved in the trial, which was led by Dr. Craig Moskowitz, ... Read more

Related support groups: Hodgkin's Lymphoma, Adcetris, Brentuximab

Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment Shows Promise in Small Trial

Posted 8 Dec 2014 by Drugs.com

SATURDAY, Dec. 6, 2014 – In a small new trial, a form of treatment based on the body's immune system appears to be helping patients with Hodgkin lymphoma for whom other treatments had failed. Hodgkin lymphoma – a cancer of white blood cells called lymphocytes – is one of the most common cancers in children and young adults in the United States, with about 10,000 new cases occurring each year. While current therapies are often successful in treating the disease, up to one-fourth of patients eventually suffer a relapse, experts say. The disease "kills more than 1,000 people in the U.S. each year and is one of the rare cancers more common in young adults than in older patients," said one expert, Dr. Joshua Brody, director of the Lymphoma Immunotherapy Program at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, in New York City. "Many people may know of actor Michael C. Hall, of television's ... Read more

Related support groups: Hodgkin's Lymphoma

Lymphoma Treatment May Harm, Halt Men's Sperm Production

Posted 26 Jul 2014 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, July 25, 2014 (HealthDay – Treatment for lymphoma may lower men's fertility, new research indicates. Both Hodgkin lymphoma and non-Hodgkin lymphoma, which are cancers of the body's white blood cells, often affect young people who are still in their reproductive years. For men, treatment for these cancers can harm or halt sperm production. Although most men regain their fertility within two years of treatment, the researchers cautioned that men should be counseled about the possibility of this significant side effect before treatment begins. "While many men can look forward to their fertility returning after treatment is over, not all will be so fortunate," Dr. Rebecca Sokol, president of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine, said in a society news release. "It is imperative that prior to the initiation of therapy, counseling and sperm preservation be made available to ... Read more

Related support groups: Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma, Hodgkin's Lymphoma

Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment Tied to Higher Risk of Stomach Cancer in Study

Posted 28 Aug 2013 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 28 – Certain radiation and chemotherapy treatments may increase Hodgkin lymphoma survivors' risk of developing stomach cancer, according to new study. Hodgkin lymphoma is a cancer of the immune system and is one of the most common cancers among teens and young adults in the United States. Advances in treatment have led to improvements in survival. Between 2003 and 2009, the five-year survival rate was 88 percent. Past research, however, has linked radiation and chemotherapy treatments to stomach cancer risk in survivors, but those studies were limited in scope. To learn more about the link between these treatments and stomach cancer risk, researchers from the U.S. National Cancer Institute examined data from more than 17,400 Hodgkin lymphoma survivors in the United States, Canada, the Netherlands, Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden who were diagnosed between 1953 and ... Read more

Related support groups: Stomach Cancer, Hodgkin's Lymphoma

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