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A Baby's Skin No Match for the Sun

Posted 3 days ago by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, June 23, 2017 – Want to help protect your children from skin cancer as they get older? Make sure they never get a serious sunburn in childhood. Just one blistering burn as a child or teen nearly doubles the risk of getting melanoma, according to the American Academy of Dermatology. "Sun protection is important at every stage of life, including infancy. Sun exposure is the most preventable risk factor for skin cancer, including melanoma," said pediatric dermatologist Sheila Fallon Friedlander. She's a professor of pediatrics and dermatology at the University of California, San Diego. "Keep sun-safety items near the front door, in your car and in your diaper bag so that you always have them ready when you're on the go," Fallon Friedlander recommended in an American Academy of Dermatology (AAD) news release. Other tips from Fallon Friedlander and the AAD include: Dress your baby ... Read more

Related support groups: Basal Cell Carcinoma, Sunburn, Melanoma, Skin Cancer, Sunscreen, Melanoma - Metastatic, Squamous Cell Carcinoma, History - Skin Cancer, Prevention of Sunburn, Deeptan, Coppertone

Many Tanning Salons Defy Legal Age Limits on Users

Posted 10 days ago by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, June 16, 2017 – Many indoor tanning salons in the United States would let underage customers tan despite government bans, a new study finds. "Enacting well-crafted age restriction laws to maximize compliance through enforcement of penalties on the state level and moving towards a national ban with similar accompanying strong enforcement . . . [is] essential to reduce skin cancer risk in the vulnerable youth population," said study leader Leah Ferrucci. She is an associate research scientist in epidemiology and a lecturer at the Yale School of Public Health. For the study, researchers posing as underage consumers phoned tanning salons in California, Connecticut, Delaware, Hawaii, Illinois, Louisiana, Minnesota, Nevada, New York, Oregon, Texas, Vermont, Washington and the District of Columbia. All had banned indoor tanning by anyone under age 17 or 18 at the time of the study. ... Read more

Related support groups: Basal Cell Carcinoma, Sunburn, Melanoma, Skin Cancer, Melanoma - Metastatic, Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Prevention of Sunburn, History - Skin Cancer

Have Scientists Created a Safe, Sun-Free Tan?

Posted 12 days ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, June 14, 2017 – Many people would love to have a natural-looking golden tan, but know that soaking up the sun raises their risk of skin cancer. Now scientists say they've developed a way to tan without exposure to damaging ultraviolet (UV) radiation. In laboratory tests, the researchers used the technique to increase pigmentation in human skin samples. And while science done at this early stage sometimes doesn't pan out in humans, the researchers remain hopeful. "The activation of the tanning/pigmentation pathway by this new class of small molecules is physiologically identical to UV-induced pigmentation without the DNA-damaging effects of UV," study leader Dr. David Fisher said in a Massachusetts General Hospital news release. Fisher is chief of dermatology at the hospital in Boston. "We need to conduct safety studies, which are always essential with potential new treatment ... Read more

Related support groups: Basal Cell Carcinoma, Sunburn, Melanoma, Skin Cancer, Sunscreen, Melanoma - Metastatic, Squamous Cell Carcinoma, History - Skin Cancer, Merkel Cell Carcinoma, Prevention of Sunburn, Deeptan, Coppertone

With Summer Sun Comes Heightened Skin Cancer Risk

Posted 15 days ago by Drugs.com

SUNDAY, June 11, 2017 – Summer beckons, and with those sunny skies comes a warning to protect yourself from skin cancer. "Skin cancer, like all types of cancer, is capable of destroying healthy tissue and spreading to distant body sites," said Dr. C. Blake Phillips, a fellow in the University of Alabama at Birmingham department of dermatology. Skin cancer is the most common type of cancer in the United States, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. It's important to take steps to prevent it and to recognize the early signs. "If undetected or untreated, skin cancers lead to loss of vital functions or death. It is important to keep an eye on your skin and watch for changes that could be a sign of skin cancer," Phillips added. Most skin cancers occur due to exposure to ultraviolet radiation from the sun or other sources, such as tanning beds, said Phillips. To ... Read more

Related support groups: Basal Cell Carcinoma, Melanoma, Skin Cancer, Sunscreen, Melanoma - Metastatic, Squamous Cell Carcinoma, History - Skin Cancer, Coppertone, Deeptan

Is Full Lymph Node Removal Always Needed for Melanoma?

Posted 18 days ago by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, June 8, 2017 – Removing all lymph nodes in the vicinity of a melanoma skin cancer may not increase a patient's overall chances for survival, a new study concludes. This invasive procedure – called complete lymph node dissection – is a standard but hotly debated treatment for melanoma, the deadliest type of skin cancer. For the study, investigators tracked more than 1,900 melanoma patients around the world. They found that complete lymph node removal was no better than less extensive surgery and observation for extending survival. "I think many more patients will decide to go with observation now, rather than immediate complete lymph node dissection," said study author Dr. Mark Faries. The findings may help clear up decades of debate regarding how best to employ lymph node removals, said Faries, co-director of the melanoma program at Angeles Clinic and Research Institute in ... Read more

Related support groups: Melanoma, Skin Cancer, Melanoma - Metastatic, History - Skin Cancer

Dark Skin No Shield From Deadly Skin Cancer

Posted 2 Jun 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, June 2, 2017 – Contrary to what many believe, dark skin doesn't offer protection against deadly melanomas, an expert warns. This type of skin cancer can be affected by genetics and is far more likely to develop on sun-protected areas of the body in blacks, Hispanics and even Asians, according to researcher Dr. Arthur Rhodes. He's director of the Melanoma Surveillance Clinic at Rush University Medical Center in Chicago. "The misconception that the sun is responsible for all cases of melanoma leads to lower survival rates because of delayed diagnosis, particularly among people of color," Rhodes said in a Rush news release. Only 10 to 15 percent of melanomas are caused by excessive sun exposure, typically in heavily freckled and sun-damaged skin, he noted. A 2016 American Academy of Dermatology study found that while melanoma incidence is higher in whites, death rates from the ... Read more

Related support groups: Melanoma, Skin Cancer, Melanoma - Metastatic, Diagnosis and Investigation, History - Skin Cancer

Sunscreen 101

Posted 16 May 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, May 16, 2017 – Many people make mistakes when using sunscreen that could increase their risk of skin cancer, a new study suggests. Researchers set up free sunscreen dispensers at the Minnesota State Fair and watched as nearly 2,200 people used them. The researchers found that only 33 percent of people applied sunscreen to all exposed skin. Only 38 percent were wearing sun-protective clothing, hats or sunglasses. Also, use of the free sunscreen dispensers fell sharply on cloudy days, the researchers reported. The study was published online May 16 in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology. "These results highlight some of the ways people use sunscreen incorrectly," study author Dr. Ingrid Polcari said in a journal news release. She is an assistant professor in the department of dermatology at the University of Minnesota Medical School. "To get the best possible sun ... Read more

Related support groups: Basal Cell Carcinoma, Sunburn, Melanoma, Skin Cancer, Sunscreen, Melanoma - Metastatic, Squamous Cell Carcinoma, History - Skin Cancer, Merkel Cell Carcinoma, Prevention of Sunburn, Deeptan, Coppertone

Health Tip: Teach Teens About Sun Safety

Posted 8 May 2017 by Drugs.com

-- Teens enjoying carefree fun in the sun may not worry about wrinkles, sun damage or skin cancer – but they should. It's a conversation that parents should have with teens to prevent problems later. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends talking to teens about: Staying out of the sun when its rays are strongest, between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. Wearing light clothing with tightly-woven fabric, which helps to reflect the sun's rays. A wide-brimmed hat and sunglasses also offer protection. Applying a broad-spectrum sunscreen every day before going outdoors, and reapplying throughout the day. Make sure it's applied to the entire body, including the tops of the ears and feet. Regularly checking skin for moles that look suspicious, and pointing any out to a parent or doctor. Read more

Related support groups: Basal Cell Carcinoma, Sunburn, Melanoma, Skin Cancer, Sunscreen, Melanoma - Metastatic, Squamous Cell Carcinoma, History - Skin Cancer, Merkel Cell Carcinoma, Prevention of Sunburn, Deeptan, Coppertone

Tanning's Allure Tied to Other Addictions

Posted 31 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, March 31, 2017 – People who seem to have a deep tan year-round – whether from the sun or indoor tanning – may be "addicted" to tanning. And new research suggests there's also a link between such tanning and other addictions. "People who were tanning-dependent were six times as likely to have a history of alcohol dependence, and were almost three times as likely to have seasonal affective disorder (SAD)," said study leader Brenda Cartmel. She is a senior research scientist at the Yale University School of Public Health. SAD is a type of depression related to the shorter, darker days of winter. Cartmel said previous smaller studies have also suggested these associations. Cartmel's team surveyed nearly 500 people who had previously sunbathed or used an indoor tanning bed. All of the participants had also been part of a study on early onset skin cancer among those under age 40 in ... Read more

Related support groups: Alcohol Dependence, Basal Cell Carcinoma, Melanoma, Skin Cancer, Seasonal Affective Disorder, Melanoma - Metastatic, Squamous Cell Carcinoma, History - Skin Cancer

Health Tip: Treat Skin Well

Posted 14 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

-- Achieving and maintaining healthy, glowing skin involve more than just keeping it clean. Here are suggestions from the American Academy of Dermatology: Apply sunscreen every day before you head outdoors. Look for one that's water resistant with an SPF of at least 30. Avoid smoking, which can age your skin and slow wound healing. Find ways to manage stress. Perform regular self-exams to look for signs of skin cancer. Wash your face when you wake, before bed and any time you sweat. Choose products designed for your skin type, such as sensitive, oily or dry. Never scrub your skin, which can be irritating. Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety and Stress, Smoking, Smoking Cessation, Dry Skin, Basal Cell Carcinoma, Melanoma, Skin Cancer, Sunscreen, Squamous Cell Carcinoma, History - Skin Cancer, Deeptan, Minor Skin Conditions, Coppertone, Minor Skin Irritation

More Teens Turning Their Backs on Tanning Beds: CDC

Posted 5 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, March 3, 2017 – The number of U.S. teens who use indoor tanning has dropped by half in recent years, a new government study reveals. Only about 7 percent of high school students said they used indoor tanning in 2015, down from almost 16 percent of students in 2009, according to results from a U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention survey. But that still leaves more than 1 million teens putting themselves at increased risk of skin cancer, including the most severe form, melanoma, by going to a tanning salon, said study lead author Gery Guy Jr. Worse, their use of indoor tanning appears to give them a false sense of security when they step outdoors into real sunlight, said Guy, a health economist with the CDC's division of cancer prevention and control. "We also found that among the 1.2 million high school students who are continuing to indoor tan, 82 percent of them ... Read more

Related support groups: Basal Cell Carcinoma, Sunburn, Melanoma, Skin Cancer, Sunscreen, Melanoma - Metastatic, Squamous Cell Carcinoma, History - Skin Cancer, Prevention of Sunburn, Deeptan, Coppertone

Hispanics Should Be Wary of the Sun's Rays, Too

Posted 3 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, March 3, 2017 – Many Latinos think they're safe from sun damage, even though advanced skin cancer is increasingly common in this group, a New York skin specialist warns. "The belief that Hispanic people don't have to worry about skin cancer has existed among Latinos for generations. They hear it from their parents and grandparents, and then they pass this belief on to their children," Dr. Maritza Perez said in an American Academy of Dermatology news release. Exposure to harmful ultraviolet radiation (from the sun and indoor tanning beds) is a controllable risk factor for skin cancer. Many Latinos, however, mistakenly believe their darker skin protects them against cancer and fail to guard against UV exposure, Perez explained. Many also think spending more time in the sun and getting a "base" tan will protect them, which is untrue, she added. Perez is a clinical professor of ... Read more

Related support groups: Basal Cell Carcinoma, Sunburn, Melanoma, Skin Cancer, Melanoma - Metastatic, Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Prevention of Sunburn, History - Skin Cancer

Skin Diseases Take Big Slice Out of America's Health, Economy

Posted 2 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, March 2, 2017 – Skin diseases have a major impact on Americans and the U.S. economy, a new report finds. "The impact of skin disease in this country is staggering, affecting one in every four Americans each year and taking a toll on lives, livelihoods and our economy," said study leader Dr. Henry Lim, incoming president of the American Academy of Dermatology (AAD). For the report, AAD researchers looked at medical claims data from 2013 on 24 skin diseases, and estimated that more than 85 million Americans are affected. People may think skin conditions aren't particularly serious, but half of the skin diseases included in the research could result in death. Skin cancers accounted for 60 percent of skin disease-related deaths, according to the report. The number of people in the United States with skin diseases in 2013 was higher than those with heart disease, diabetes or ... Read more

Related support groups: Diabetes, Type 2, Skin Rash, Heart Disease, Psoriasis, Renal Failure, Insulin Resistance, Chronic Kidney Disease, Skin Cancer, Skin and Structure Infection, Diabetes Mellitus, History - Skin Cancer, Minor Skin Irritation, Minor Skin Conditions

Some Melanoma Survivors Still Seek Out the Sun

Posted 2 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, March 2, 2017 – Even after surviving the potentially deadly skin cancer melanoma, some people continue to go out in the summer sun without protection. That's the stunning finding of a study of more than 700 melanoma survivors that revealed that 20 percent of them had suffered a sunburn in the past year. And only 62 percent said they "often" or "always" wore sunscreen when they were outside on a summer day. But many melanoma survivors are more vigilant about sun protection than other people their age, the study also found. "They're doing OK, but there's room for improvement," said study lead researcher Rachel Vogel. She's an assistant professor at the University of Minnesota's department of obstetrics, gynecology and women's health. Dr. Len Lichtenfeld, deputy chief medical officer of the American Cancer Society (ACS), agreed. "Survivors are doing better than other people, but ... Read more

Related support groups: Basal Cell Carcinoma, Sunburn, Melanoma, Skin Cancer, Sunscreen, Melanoma - Metastatic, Squamous Cell Carcinoma, History - Skin Cancer, Prevention of Sunburn, Deeptan, Coppertone

Indoor Tanning: A Big Financial Hit to U.S. Health Care

Posted 28 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Feb. 28, 2017 – Skin cancers linked to indoor tanning are estimated to have cost the U.S. health care system hundreds of millions of dollars in 2015, a new study says. "Skin cancer is the most common cancer in the U.S. and its incidence is increasing, due in part to the increase in the use of tanning devices," said study author Hugh Waters. He's a health economist and associate professor at the University of North Carolina. "We know these devices have significant health and financial impacts, and with this study we wanted to establish these impacts clearly to support efforts to reduce their use, especially among younger people," Waters added. Researchers estimate there were 263,000 U.S. cases of tanning device-related skin cancers in 2015. The total medical costs for those cases reached an estimated $343 million. Also, the researchers said those skin cancers will lead to a ... Read more

Related support groups: Basal Cell Carcinoma, Melanoma, Skin Cancer, Melanoma - Metastatic, Squamous Cell Carcinoma, History - Skin Cancer

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