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History - Radiation Therapy News

Radiation and Chemotherapy Together Boost Lung Cancer Survival

Posted 27 Sep 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Sept. 26, 2017 – Combining radiation therapy with chemotherapy has substantially extended survival for many people with lung cancer, two new studies report. About 32 percent of non-small cell lung cancer patients who received chemoradiation therapy were still alive five years following treatment, a survival rate double that of previous estimates, according to results from a long-term clinical trial. Further, a small second clinical trial of people with lung cancer that had already spread to other parts of the body showed that radiation therapy added to chemo dramatically slowed the time until these cancers progressed further. The two studies show that radiation therapy and chemotherapy work well together, and that radiation also might help patients who are undergoing newer forms of cancer treatment like targeted therapy and immunotherapy, said Dr. Benjamin Movsas, a radiation ... Read more

Related support groups: Lung Cancer, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Small Cell Lung Cancer, History - Radiation Therapy, Bronchogenic Carcinoma

Breast Cancer Radiation 'Less Scary' Than Thought

Posted 25 Sep 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Sept. 25, 2017 – Radiation therapy for breast cancer is actually "less scary" than anticipated, nine out of 10 patients say after treatment. A survey of 300-plus breast cancer patients also found that more than 80 percent said the side effects of radiation were better than expected. "The word radiation itself sounds frightening and is associated with many negative news stories," said lead researcher Dr. Narek Shaverdian, of the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). But over the last 20 years, significant advances have been made, said Shaverdian, chief resident in radiation oncology at UCLA's David Geffen School of Medicine. "These changes allow us to spare critical organs, create an individual radiation plan for each patient, and also deliver radiation in more convenient schedules," he explained. Shaverdian and his team surveyed patients who had received radiation while ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Breast Cancer, Breast Cancer, Metastatic, Breast Cancer - Adjuvant, Breast Cancer, Prevention, Breast Cancer - Palliative, Nausea/Vomiting - Radiation Induced, Osteolytic Bone Metastases of Breast Cancer, History - Radiation Therapy

Cancer Treatment Can Affect Your Food Preferences

Posted 19 Sep 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Sept. 19, 2017 – Cancer therapies often change patients' sense of taste, which may affect what they like to eat, according to a nutrition expert. "Increased taste sensitivities are more common than a muting of taste," said Catherine Carpenter, professor of clinical nutrition at UCLA's David Geffen School of Medicine. "Usually, the type of taste sensitivity encountered is one of a metallic nature." Changes in tastes often influence a person's food preferences, but treatment may affect individuals differently, Carpenter noted in a university news release. "If anything, patients tend to prefer bland foods rather than spicy foods," she said. "It's important to remember that preferences may vary depending on the cancer and type of treatment. You cannot lump all cancer patients into one dietary regimen." After treatments, such as chemo or radiation therapy, a nutritionist can help ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Methotrexate, Breast Cancer, Oral and Dental Conditions, Xerostomia, Fluorouracil, Colorectal Cancer, Xeloda, Hydroxyurea, Nausea/Vomiting - Chemotherapy Induced, Mercaptopurine, Hydrea, Capecitabine, Dacogen, Gemzar, Gemcitabine, Alimta, Decitabine, Cladribine, Cytarabine

Antiperspirant Use Seems Safe During Breast Cancer Treatment: Study

Posted 11 Aug 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Aug. 11, 2017 – Contrary to what some doctors might say, new research suggests it's OK to use antiperspirants while undergoing radiation therapy for breast cancer. Researchers surveyed 92 patients and found that 79 percent said their doctors had told them not to use antiperspirants during treatment. And a survey of 105 doctors and nurses found that 82 percent said they regularly told breast cancer patients not to use antiperspirants during radiation therapy. The reason for the warning is the fear that antiperspirant use could lead to greater radiation damage to the skin, according to the study authors. The University of Pennsylvania researchers conducted laboratory tests and found no difference in the radiation dose absorbed – whether or not patients used antiperspirants. The study was published online recently in the journal Radiotherapy and Oncology. "Going without ... Read more

Related support groups: Hyperhidrosis, Breast Cancer, Drysol, Hypercare, Breast Cancer - Adjuvant, Aluminum Chloride Hexahydrate, Certain Dri, Xerac AC, History - Radiation Therapy, B+Drier

Childhood Cancer Radiation May Cause Unwanted Gene Mutation in Some

Posted 4 Aug 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Aug. 4, 2017 – Some adult survivors of childhood cancer go on to develop brain tumors, and now researchers say they've found a gene mutation that seems to increase that risk. The researchers said their findings could lead to ways to prevent these brain tumors. Adults who had radiation to their head and spine to treat childhood cancer have a greater risk of meningiomas. These tumors, which are often benign, are the most common type of brain tumor in adults, according to the American Brain Tumor Association. In this study, Canadian researchers looked at 31 radiation-induced meningiomas in patients who underwent head and spine radiation during childhood. Most of them (74 percent) had survived either leukemia or pediatric brain cancer. These brain tumors were compared with 30 meningiomas among people in the general population. Gelareh Zadeh, the study's co-principal investigator, ... Read more

Related support groups: Brain Tumor, Diagnosis and Investigation, History - Radiation Therapy

Mission to Mars Would Double Astronauts' Cancer Risk

Posted 15 Jun 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, June 15, 2017 – Once astronauts leave the Earth's protective magnetic field, their cancer risk would soar while traveling to Mars, new research indicates. Scientists said radiation exposure during a long-term deep-space mission would not only affect already damaged cells but also healthy ones nearby, doubling cancer risk. Cosmic rays cause significant cell damage due from exposure to radiation, protons and heavy ions, the authors explained. Previous research has shown the health risks of deep space travel include cancer, cataracts, acute radiation syndromes, and problems with circulation and the central nervous system. Typical risk models, including those used by NASA, assume radiation cancers are caused by DNA damage and mutations. These models, however, are based on much shorter times than a Mars mission would require, researchers noted. "Exploring Mars will require ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Cataract, History - Radiation Therapy

Childhood Cancer Survivors Now Living Healthier Lives

Posted 2 Jun 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, June 2, 2017 – For people who battled cancer in childhood, the prospects for a long life without cancer recurrence or chronic illness are better than ever, a new study finds. That's largely due to changes in cancer treatment protocols that have meant less toxicity to children and less chance for long-term side effects, researchers said. This is the first "comprehensive" study on the issue, said study author Dr. Todd Gibson, who's with the cancer control department at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital in Memphis, Tenn. As the researchers explained, more children are surviving cancer, but the chemotherapy and radiation they receive as treatment can raise their risk for adult illness years later. So, cancer specialists have worked hard over time to modify treatments to maximize benefits but minimize long-term risks. And it seems to have paid off. In the new study, Gibson's ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Leukemia, Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Hodgkin's Lymphoma, Wilms' Tumor, History - Radiation Therapy

Is One Round of Radiation Enough for Spine Pain in Cancer Patients?

Posted 2 Jun 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, June 2, 2017 – Just one dose of radiation works as well as a full week of treatment to ease debilitating spinal pain in patients with advanced cancer, a new study shows. Known as spinal cord compression, the condition happens when a tumor presses against the spine. It can cause pain, numbness, tingling and difficulty walking. Radiation is often used to relieve these symptoms of spinal compression, but there is no standard recommended length of treatment, the study authors said. They assessed 688 patients with prostate, lung, breast and gastrointestinal cancers that had spread and found that a single radiation treatment was as effective as five radiation sessions. The patients were assessed by how well they could walk and move. The researchers found that both short-course and longer-course radiation treatments helped patients stay mobile. The study was to be presented Friday at ... Read more

Related support groups: Pain, Cancer, History - Radiation Therapy

Health Tip: Getting an X-Ray During Pregnancy

Posted 16 May 2017 by Drugs.com

-- X-rays provide important insight to doctors trying to diagnose a bone problem. But there are some risks associated with exposure to radiation. However, the risks of avoiding an X-ray are likely to be greater than the small risk of having one. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration suggests these ways to minimize your risk: Always tell your doctor if you are pregnant, or could be pregnant. If you are pregnant and an older sibling needs an X-ray, don't hold the child during the procedure. If your doctor orders an X-ray but you've had one recently, tell your doctor. You might not need another. Talk to your doctor about why you need an X-ray and your concerns about risks during pregnancy. Read more

Related support groups: Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation during Pregnancy/Lactation, Diagnosis and Investigation, History - Radiation Therapy, Body Imaging, Radiographic Exam

A Movie Instead of Anesthesia for Kids' Radiation Therapy

Posted 9 May 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, May 9, 2017 – For children with cancer, watching movies during radiation therapy might eliminate their need for general anesthesia, a new study suggests. Kid-friendly movies such as "SpongeBob SquarePants" and "Cars" helped reduce the risks, trauma and costs of treatment for kids evaluated in the small European study. Cancer is rare in children, but those who develop tumors in their brain, bone and other soft tissues may require radiation therapy. "Being treated with radiotherapy means coming in for a treatment every weekday for four to six weeks. The children need to remain motionless during treatment and, on the whole, that means a general anesthesia. That, in turn, means they have to keep their stomach empty for six hours before the treatment," said study author and radiation therapist Catia Aguas. "We wanted to see if installing a projector and letting children watch a ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Anesthesia, Light Anesthesia, Nausea/Vomiting - Radiation Induced, History - Radiation Therapy, Coma Induction, Anesthetic Adjunct

Health Tip: Eat Healthy After Radiation Therapy

Posted 7 Apr 2017 by Drugs.com

-- A potential side effect of radiation therapy is loss of appetite. But experts say it's important to continue to eat nutritious meals during treatment. The Cleveland Clinic suggests: Doing light exercise to help boost your appetite. Eating frequent and small meals, including foods that are easy to prepare and high in calories and protein. Avoiding drinks that aren't very nutritious. Making meals fun by including favorite foods and using bright, colorful dishes. Enjoying some company while you eat, by going to a restaurant or having a dinner guest. Eating a variety of healthy foods, including nutritious additions, such as parsley or colorful bell peppers. Read more

Related support groups: Nausea/Vomiting - Radiation Induced, History - Radiation Therapy

Smokers May Be Prone to Risks From Breast Cancer Radiation Therapy

Posted 29 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, March 29, 2017 – Breast cancer patients who smoke have an increased risk for serious long-term complications from radiation therapy, a new study finds. "This research highlights that breast cancer patients who smoke need to be offered help and support in order to try and quit to minimize any risks from their treatment," Dr. Julie Sharp said in a Cancer Research UK news release. She's head of health information for the research and awareness charity based in the United Kingdom. "It's important to remember that modern-day radiotherapy techniques have been refined and improved to make sure it is targeted and effective while reducing the risk of side effects," Sharp added. British researchers looked at data from nearly 41,000 breast cancer patients. The information came from 75 different studies on radiation therapy for breast cancer. The researchers found that the long-term ... Read more

Related support groups: Smoking, Breast Cancer, Smoking Cessation, Breast Cancer, Metastatic, Breast Cancer - Adjuvant, Breast Cancer - Palliative, History - Radiation Therapy

Family History of Colon Cancer Calls for Earlier Screening

Posted 21 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, March 21, 2017 – If you've got a family history of colon or rectal cancers, you probably need to start screening for these conditions before you turn 50, a cancer expert says. People with a close relative who has had colon or rectal cancer have a greater risk of being diagnosed with these cancers too, said Dr. Walter Koltun, chief of colon and rectal surgery at the Penn State Health Hershey Medical Center in a hospital news release. "A significant portion of the population does have those risk factors," Koltun said. "And their risk goes up significantly depending on who has been affected." If more than one close relative has had colon or rectal cancer, your risk of getting such a cancer is 12 times greater, he added. People who are diagnosed with colon or rectal cancers at a young age are more likely to have a genetic trait that could increase their risk for the disease. ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Breast Cancer, Crohn's Disease, Colonoscopy, Prostate Cancer, Colorectal Cancer, Inflammatory Bowel Disease, History - Radiation Therapy

Prostate Cancer Treatments Have Varying Side Effects, Study Shows

Posted 21 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, March 21, 2017 – The long-term side effects of different prostate cancer treatments vary – and knowing that may help men decide which one is right for them. That's the conclusion of two new studies published March 21 in the Journal of the American Medical Association. Both followed men who had early stage prostate cancer treated with "modern" approaches – including the latest surgical and radiation techniques. And both found that side effects sometimes persisted for up to three years. The specifics, however, varied. Many men had surgery to remove the prostate. Overall, they tended to have greater declines in their sexual function, versus men who chose radiation or "active surveillance." They were also more prone to urinary incontinence. On the other hand, men treated with radiation typically had more problems with bowel function. If they also received hormonal therapy, they ... Read more

Related support groups: Urinary Tract Infection, Bladder Infection, Prostate Cancer, Casodex, Xtandi, Bicalutamide, Danazol, Danocrine, Flutamide, Nilutamide, History - Radiation Therapy, Enzalutamide, Eulexin, Nilandron

Is Radiation Therapy Overused in Breast Cancer Care?

Posted 14 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, March 14, 2017 – More than half of older American women with early breast cancer may get more radiation therapy than needed, which significantly boosts medical costs, a new study indicates. Analyzing 2011 data on breast cancer patients, researchers estimated $164 million could have been saved by ordering a shorter radiation course. "Women who were eligible for shorter radiation courses or omission of radiation were still often receiving longer and more costly radiation courses," said study leader Dr. Rachel Greenup. She's an assistant professor of surgery at Duke University Medical Center Cancer Institute in Durham, N.C. However, Greenup and other experts said the study results might not be applicable to today because more women are receiving shorter courses of radiation than in 2011. For the study, Greenup's team used data on 43,000 breast cancer patients age 50 and older ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Breast Cancer, Tamoxifen, Breast Cancer - Adjuvant, Breast Cancer, Prevention, Breast Cancer - Palliative, Nausea/Vomiting - Radiation Induced, Tamoxifen Hexal, History - Radiation Therapy, Tamofen, Tamosin, Emblon, Nolvadex, Soltamox, Tamone, Tamoxen, Genox, Nolvadex D

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