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Related terms: Total hip replacement, Hip arthroplasty

Grandparents Help Shape Kids' Views on Aging

Posted 7 days ago by Drugs.com

SATURDAY, Jan. 13, 2018 – Kids who have a good relationship with their grandparents are less likely to become prejudiced against old people, a new study has found. That prejudice, known as ageism, is fairly common in children, even in those as young as 3, according to researchers from the University of Liege in Belgium. However, their study found that ageism tends to dwindle at about ages 10 to 12 and that, when it comes to their grandparents, it's the quality rather than the quantity of a relationship that makes the most difference. "The most important factor associated with ageist stereotypes was poor quality of contact with grandparents," study leader Allison Flamion, a graduate student in psychology, said in a news release from the Society for Research in Child Development. "We asked children to describe how they felt about seeing their grandparents," she said. "Those who felt ... Read more

Related support groups: Hip Replacement, Facial Wrinkles

'Bone Cement': A Non-Surgical Option for Painful Joints?

Posted 11 days ago by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Jan. 11, 2018 – Injecting a calcium-based cement into the bones of some people with knee or hip pain could help them avoid joint replacement surgery, Ohio State University doctors say. The calcium phosphate cement flows into the spongy inside portion of the bone, filling in microfractures and other damaged areas, and it hardens in about 10 minutes' time, said Dr. Kelton Vasileff, an orthopedic surgeon at the university's Wexner Medical Center. The cement braces the bruised or injured joint bone from the inside, Vasileff explained, and eventually is replaced by new bone as part of the body's natural healing process. The procedure, called subchondroplasty, has been available to people with knee problems for years, Vasileff said. Now he and his colleagues are testing to see whether hip patients also can benefit from it. It is much less invasive than a knee or hip replacement, ... Read more

Related support groups: Pain, Hip Replacement, Knee Joint Replacement, Posture, Calcium Phosphate, Tribasic

Checking Prices for Medical Procedures Online? Good Luck

Posted 5 Dec 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Dec. 5, 2017 – The cards seem to be stacked against anyone who'd like to use the internet to become a smarter health care consumer. A new study has found that people searching online to figure out how much they'll pay for a medical procedure will come away disappointed most of the time, said lead researcher Allison Kratka. She's a medical student at Duke University in Durham, N.C. "Fewer than 1 in 5 websites actually yielded a local price estimate that was relevant to the health care procedure in question," Kratka said. To help halt the rising cost of health care, Kratka said, patients are being encouraged to learn more about the prices of medical procedures they need. However, it's unclear whether the resources exist to help people gain a real understanding of what a procedure costs and what they would have to pay out-of-pocket, she said. To see whether the internet is of any ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Knee Joint Replacement, Hip Replacement, Orthopedic Surgery

Steroid Injections for Arthritic Hips: More Trouble Than They're Worth?

Posted 29 Nov 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 29, 2017 – They may temporarily ease pain, but new research suggests that steroid injections to arthritic hips may exacerbate bone trouble over the longer term. These injections have long been used "for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes for various joint conditions," noted Dr. Crispin Ong, an orthopedic surgeon who was not involved with the study but reviewed the new findings. However, "this study brings to light concern over the safety of hip steroid injections for osteoarthritis," said Ong, who practices at Northwell Health's Plainview Hospital in Plainview, N.Y. The new study was led by Dr. Connie Chang, a radiologist at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. Her team tracked outcomes for three groups: 102 patients, ages 19 to 92, who received hip steroid injections; another group of 102 patients with hip arthritis who did not receive such injections; and a ... Read more

Related support groups: Osteoarthritis, Hip Replacement, MLK F2, Decadron with Xylocaine, Dexamethasone/Lidocaine, Bupivacaine/lidocaine/triamcinolone

Don't Delay Hip Fracture Surgery. Here's Why

Posted 28 Nov 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Nov. 28, 2017 – Seniors with a fractured hip need surgery as soon as possible or they could suffer life-threatening complications, a new Canadian study concludes. Having surgery within 24 hours decreases the risk of hip fracture-related death. It also lowers odds of problems such as pneumonia, heart attack and blocked arteries, the researchers found. "We found that there appears to be a safe window, within the first 24 hours," said lead researcher Daniel Pincus, a doctoral student with the University of Toronto. "After 24 hours, risk began to clearly increase," Pincus said. U.S. and Canadian guidelines recommend hip fracture surgery within 48 hours of injury, but it's likely that many people don't receive care that quickly, he noted. In the United Kingdom, guidelines call for surgery within 36 hours, but hospitals often fail to get patients promptly into the operating room, ... Read more

Related support groups: Hip Replacement, Fracture, bone, Orthopedic Surgery, Prevention of Fractures

People Tend to Overestimate Pain From Surgery

Posted 4 Nov 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Nov. 3, 2017 – Many patients overestimate the amount of pain they'll experience after surgery, resulting in needless anxiety, a new study reports. "We believe providers need to do a better job of counseling patients on realistic pain expectations," said study co-author Dr. Jaime Baratta, director of regional anesthesia at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital in Philadelphia. The research included 223 patients. Their average age was 61. All had orthopedic, neurological or general surgery. Of these, 96 received some form of regional anesthesia (spinal, epidural or peripheral nerve block). The remaining 127 patients received only general anesthesia. Before their surgery, the patients estimated what level of postoperative pain they expected on a 0-10 scale (10 being the most painful). After surgery, they were asked about their level of pain in the post-anesthesia care unit one hour ... Read more

Related support groups: Suboxone, Oxycodone, Surgery, Tramadol, Hydrocodone, Methadone, Percocet, OxyContin, Vicodin, Norco, Fentanyl, Morphine, Codeine, Lortab, Opana, Subutex, Dilaudid, Opana ER, MS Contin, Roxicodone

Genetic Testing May Help Make Warfarin Safer

Posted 26 Sep 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Sept. 26, 2017 – Genetic testing can improve the safety of the blood thinner warfarin, a new study reports. Warfarin (Coumadin, Jantoven) is often prescribed to prevent life-threatening blood clots in high-risk patients. However, a patient's genes can influence how warfarin is processed in the body. Too little warfarin will not prevent blood clots while too much can trigger internal bleeding, the researchers explained. Warfarin is "a widely used anticoagulant, but it causes more major adverse events than any other oral drug. Thousands of patients end up in the emergency department or hospital because of warfarin-induced bleeding. But we continue to prescribe it because it is highly effective, reversible and inexpensive," said study first author Dr. Brian Gage. He is a professor of medicine at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. The researchers said they ... Read more

Related support groups: Warfarin, Coumadin, Knee Joint Replacement, Hip Replacement, Diagnosis and Investigation, Jantoven, Coagulation Defects and Disorders

Health Tip: Adapting After Hip Replacement

Posted 24 Jul 2017 by Drugs.com

-- If you're among the millions of people who have had hip replacement surgery, there are some do's and don'ts until you fully recover. The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons suggests: For at least six weeks, don't sit with your legs crossed. Keep the legs in a forward-facing position Don't raise your knee higher than your hip. Sit with the leg in front of you. While seated, don't lean forward or stretch to get something off the floor. Kneel down on the knee that's on the side that was operated on. While bending down, don't turn your feet to an extreme inward or outward position. Also, don't bend at the waist more than 90 degrees. While in bed, don't reach to grab the blankets. Manage pain by applying an ice pack wrapped in a towel. Apply heat for about 20 minutes before exercise. If exercising is painful, reduce the length of your session, but don't stop altogether. Read more

Related support groups: Hip Replacement, Knee Joint Replacement, Orthopedic Surgery

Obese Don't Have to Lose Weight Before Joint Replacement: Study

Posted 24 Jul 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, July 24, 2017 – Obese patients don't need to lose weight before undergoing knee or hip replacement surgery, a new study contends. "Severely obese patients can benefit a lot from the surgery," said study lead author Wenjun Li, an associate professor of medicine at the University of Massachusetts Medical School. "Patients who can lose weight should, but we acknowledge many people can't, or it will take a long time during which their joints will worsen. If they can get the surgery earlier, once function is restored they can better address obesity," Li said in a university news release. For the study, researchers examined the outcomes of more than 2,000 patients who had total hip replacement and just under 3,000 who had total knee replacement in the United States between May 2011 and March 2013. Obese patients achieved about the same pain relief and improved function as ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Weight Loss, Hip Replacement, Knee Joint Replacement, Orthopedic Surgery

Taking the Stairs May Soon Get Easier

Posted 12 Jul 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, July 12, 2017 – Does a long staircase leave you weak? Take heart – researchers say they've developed stairs that "recycle" a person's energy, which could be of help to seniors and disabled people. The stairs use latched springs to store energy when someone goes down them. The energy is then released when a person climbs the stairs again. According to the researchers from Georgia Institute of Technology and Emory University in Atlanta, the high-tech stairs absorb a person's energy as he or she descends, which cuts forces on the ankle by 26 percent. But when the person then ascends the same stairs, that energy is released, making the stairs spring up a bit. The ascent is therefore 37 percent easier on the knees than it otherwise would be. "Unlike normal walking where each heel-strike dissipates energy that can be potentially restored, stair ascent is actually very energy ... Read more

Related support groups: Hip Replacement, Knee Joint Replacement, Prevention of Falls

New Guidelines Say No to Most 'Keyhole' Knee Surgeries

Posted 11 May 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, May 10, 2017 – "Keyhole" arthroscopic surgery should rarely be used to repair arthritic knee joints, a panel of international experts says in new clinical guidelines. Clinical trials have shown that keyhole surgery doesn't help people suffering from arthritis of the knees any more than mild painkillers, physical therapy or weight loss, said lead author Dr. Reed Siemieniuk. He is a health researcher with McMaster University in Toronto, Canada. "You can make a pretty strong statement saying that from a long-term perspective, it really doesn't help at all," Siemieniuk said. "If they knew all the evidence, almost nobody would choose to have this surgery." Keyhole surgery is one of the most common surgical procedures in the world, with more than 2 million performed each year, Siemieniuk said. The United States alone spends about $3 billion a year on the procedure. The new ... Read more

Related support groups: Osteoarthritis, Knee Joint Replacement, Hip Replacement, Orthopedic Surgery, Arthrography

Do Your Knees Crackle and Pop?

Posted 5 May 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, May 5, 2017 – Knees that "pop," "click" or "crackle" may sometimes be headed toward arthritis in the near future, a new study suggests. It's common for the knees to get a little noisy on occasion, and hearing a "crack" during your yoga class is probably not something to worry about, experts say. But in the new study, middle-aged and older adults who said their knees often crackled were more likely to develop arthritis symptoms in the next year. Of those who complained their knees were "always" noisy, 11 percent developed knee arthritis symptoms within a year. That compared with 4.5 percent of people who said their knees "never" popped or cracked. Everyone else fell into the middle. Of people who said their knees "sometimes" or "often" made noise, roughly 8 percent developed knee arthritis symptoms in the next year. Doctors have a term for those joint noises: crepitus. Patients ... Read more

Related support groups: Osteoarthritis, Hip Replacement, Knee Joint Replacement, Fracture, bone, Orthopedic Surgery

Women More Sensitive to Metal Joint Implants Than Men: Study

Posted 26 Apr 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, April 26, 2017 – One reason women are more likely than men to have complications after hip or knee replacement surgery may be because they're more sensitive to the metals in joint implants, a new study suggests. Researchers reviewed the cases of more than 2,600 patients who were evaluated for unexplained pain after total hip and/or knee replacement. All had metal implants. None had signs of infection, inflammation or other conditions that would explain their pain. Sixty percent of the patients were women. They had higher average pain scores than men – 6.8 vs. 6.1 on a scale of 0-10, according to the study. Blood tests showed signs of immune sensitization to implant metals in 49 percent of the women and 38 percent of the men. The gender difference remained even after researchers used a stricter definition of sensitization – 25 percent versus 18 percent. "These findings may ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Hip Replacement, Knee Joint Replacement, Orthopedic Surgery

Smoking May Raise Risk of Complications After Joint Surgery

Posted 5 Apr 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, April 5, 2017 – Hip or knee replacement patients who smoke are at increased risk for infections requiring repeat surgery, researchers report. They analyzed data from more than 15,000 patients who underwent either total hip or knee replacements between 2000 and 2014. The investigators found that the overall risk of repeat surgery for infections within 90 days was only 0.71 percent. However, the risk was 1.2 percent for current smokers, compared with 0.56 percent for nonsmokers. After adjusting for other factors, the researchers concluded that current smokers' risk was 80 percent higher than nonsmokers and former smokers. The researchers also found that for both current and former smokers, the risk of 90-day hospital readmission not involving surgery rose with the number of "pack-years" smoked – a calculation of the number of packs smoked per day over a number of years. ... Read more

Related support groups: Smoking, Smoking Cessation, Knee Joint Replacement, Hip Replacement, Nicotine, Orthopedic Surgery, Nicorette, Nicoderm CQ, Nicotrol Inhaler, Commit, Habitrol, Nicorette DS, Nicotrol NS, ProStep, Nicotrol TD, Nicorelief

Smokers Prone to Problems After Joint Replacement: Study

Posted 16 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, March 16, 2017 – Quitting smoking before knee or hip replacement surgery may cut the risk of complications after surgery, a new study suggests. Instead of just telling people to quit smoking, these findings suggest that doctors should guide people into pre-surgery smoking-cessation programs for smokers, the researchers said. "We've known that smokers do worse than non-smokers after joint replacements, and now this research shows there's good early evidence that quitting smoking before surgery may improve their outcomes," said study author Dr. Amy Wasterlain. She's a fourth-year orthopaedic surgery resident at NYU Langone Medical Center in New York City. "Not every risk factor can be reduced before a joint replacement, but smoking status is one that should be a top priority for orthopedic surgeons and their patients," she added in an NYU news release. The study included more ... Read more

Related support groups: Smoking, Smoking Cessation, Knee Joint Replacement, Hip Replacement, Nicotine, Orthopedic Surgery, Nicorette, Nicoderm CQ, Nicotrol Inhaler, Commit, Habitrol, Nicorette DS, Nicotrol NS, ProStep, Nicotrol TD, Nicorelief

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