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Related terms: Total hip replacement, Hip arthroplasty

New Guidelines Say No to Most 'Keyhole' Knee Surgeries

Posted 14 days ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, May 10, 2017 – "Keyhole" arthroscopic surgery should rarely be used to repair arthritic knee joints, a panel of international experts says in new clinical guidelines. Clinical trials have shown that keyhole surgery doesn't help people suffering from arthritis of the knees any more than mild painkillers, physical therapy or weight loss, said lead author Dr. Reed Siemieniuk. He is a health researcher with McMaster University in Toronto, Canada. "You can make a pretty strong statement saying that from a long-term perspective, it really doesn't help at all," Siemieniuk said. "If they knew all the evidence, almost nobody would choose to have this surgery." Keyhole surgery is one of the most common surgical procedures in the world, with more than 2 million performed each year, Siemieniuk said. The United States alone spends about $3 billion a year on the procedure. The new ... Read more

Related support groups: Osteoarthritis, Knee Joint Replacement, Hip Replacement, Orthopedic Surgery, Arthrography

Do Your Knees Crackle and Pop?

Posted 19 days ago by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, May 5, 2017 – Knees that "pop," "click" or "crackle" may sometimes be headed toward arthritis in the near future, a new study suggests. It's common for the knees to get a little noisy on occasion, and hearing a "crack" during your yoga class is probably not something to worry about, experts say. But in the new study, middle-aged and older adults who said their knees often crackled were more likely to develop arthritis symptoms in the next year. Of those who complained their knees were "always" noisy, 11 percent developed knee arthritis symptoms within a year. That compared with 4.5 percent of people who said their knees "never" popped or cracked. Everyone else fell into the middle. Of people who said their knees "sometimes" or "often" made noise, roughly 8 percent developed knee arthritis symptoms in the next year. Doctors have a term for those joint noises: crepitus. Patients ... Read more

Related support groups: Osteoarthritis, Knee Joint Replacement, Hip Replacement, Fracture, bone, Orthopedic Surgery

Women More Sensitive to Metal Joint Implants Than Men: Study

Posted 26 Apr 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, April 26, 2017 – One reason women are more likely than men to have complications after hip or knee replacement surgery may be because they're more sensitive to the metals in joint implants, a new study suggests. Researchers reviewed the cases of more than 2,600 patients who were evaluated for unexplained pain after total hip and/or knee replacement. All had metal implants. None had signs of infection, inflammation or other conditions that would explain their pain. Sixty percent of the patients were women. They had higher average pain scores than men – 6.8 vs. 6.1 on a scale of 0-10, according to the study. Blood tests showed signs of immune sensitization to implant metals in 49 percent of the women and 38 percent of the men. The gender difference remained even after researchers used a stricter definition of sensitization – 25 percent versus 18 percent. "These findings may ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Knee Joint Replacement, Hip Replacement, Orthopedic Surgery

Smoking May Raise Risk of Complications After Joint Surgery

Posted 5 Apr 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, April 5, 2017 – Hip or knee replacement patients who smoke are at increased risk for infections requiring repeat surgery, researchers report. They analyzed data from more than 15,000 patients who underwent either total hip or knee replacements between 2000 and 2014. The investigators found that the overall risk of repeat surgery for infections within 90 days was only 0.71 percent. However, the risk was 1.2 percent for current smokers, compared with 0.56 percent for nonsmokers. After adjusting for other factors, the researchers concluded that current smokers' risk was 80 percent higher than nonsmokers and former smokers. The researchers also found that for both current and former smokers, the risk of 90-day hospital readmission not involving surgery rose with the number of "pack-years" smoked – a calculation of the number of packs smoked per day over a number of years. ... Read more

Related support groups: Smoking, Smoking Cessation, Knee Joint Replacement, Nicotine, Hip Replacement, Orthopedic Surgery, Nicorette, Nicoderm CQ, Nicotrol Inhaler, Commit, Habitrol, ProStep, Nicotrol TD, Nicorelief, Nicorette DS, Nicotrol NS

Smokers Prone to Problems After Joint Replacement: Study

Posted 16 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, March 16, 2017 – Quitting smoking before knee or hip replacement surgery may cut the risk of complications after surgery, a new study suggests. Instead of just telling people to quit smoking, these findings suggest that doctors should guide people into pre-surgery smoking-cessation programs for smokers, the researchers said. "We've known that smokers do worse than non-smokers after joint replacements, and now this research shows there's good early evidence that quitting smoking before surgery may improve their outcomes," said study author Dr. Amy Wasterlain. She's a fourth-year orthopaedic surgery resident at NYU Langone Medical Center in New York City. "Not every risk factor can be reduced before a joint replacement, but smoking status is one that should be a top priority for orthopedic surgeons and their patients," she added in an NYU news release. The study included more ... Read more

Related support groups: Smoking, Smoking Cessation, Knee Joint Replacement, Nicotine, Hip Replacement, Orthopedic Surgery, Nicorette, Nicoderm CQ, Nicotrol Inhaler, Commit, Habitrol, ProStep, Nicotrol TD, Nicorelief, Nicorette DS, Nicotrol NS

Home Beats Rehab for Knee, Hip Replacement Recovery

Posted 16 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, March 16, 2017 – Patients who go straight home from the hospital following hip or knee replacement surgery recover as well as, or better than, those who first go to a rehabilitation center, new research indicates. And that includes those who live alone without family or friends, one of three studies shows. "We can say with confidence that recovering independently at home does not put patients at increased risk for complications or hardship, and the vast majority of patients were satisfied," said that study's co-author, Dr. William Hozack. He is an orthopaedic surgery professor with the Rothman Institute at the Thomas Jefferson University Medical School in Philadelphia. Hozack noted that while in the past it was "not uncommon for patients to enter a rehabilitation facility in order to receive additional physical therapy," most patients today do not end up going to a secondary ... Read more

Related support groups: Knee Joint Replacement, Hip Replacement, Orthopedic Surgery, Wound Infection

Osteoporosis Fractures May Be Deadlier for Men

Posted 15 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, March 15, 2017 – Men are more likely than women to die after suffering an osteoporosis-related fracture, researchers report. Osteoporosis, a disease where bones become weak and brittle, affects more than 44 million Americans. It contributes to about 2 million fractures a year, with women suffering more of these broken bones than men. "Although women are more likely to sustain an initial, osteoporosis-related 'fragility fracture,' men have similar rates of incurring a subsequent fracture and are at greater risk for mortality after these injuries," said study author Dr. Alan Zhang. Zhang is an orthopaedic surgeon and assistant professor at the University of California, San Francisco. For the study, researchers analyzed data from more than 1 million Americans, aged 65 and older, who had osteoporosis and suffered a fracture between 2005 and 2009. Of those patients, 87 percent ... Read more

Related support groups: Osteoporosis, Hip Replacement, Fracture, bone, Prevention of Osteoporosis, Osteopenia, Caltrate 600 with D, Compression Fracture of Vertebral Column, Calcium/Vitamin D, Citracal + D, Citracal Petites, Oysco 500 with D, Osteomalacia, Oyster Shell Calcium, Citracal Creamy Bites, Calcet, Calcium 600 D, Calcarb with D, Sedecal D, Oyster Shell Calcium with Vitamin D, Calcio Del Mar

Higher Spending by Docs May Not Buy Better Health

Posted 13 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, March 13, 2017 – Just because your doctor orders more – or more high-priced – tests and procedures when you're in the hospital doesn't mean that you get better care, a new study suggests. Medicare patients treated by higher-spending physicians are just as likely to be re-admitted or die within 30 days of being admitted to the hospital as patients treated by doctors who order fewer or less-expensive tests and treatments, the study revealed. "Spending more doesn't always mean you get better health," senior study author Dr. Anupam Jena, of Harvard Medical School, said in a statement. Health care spending in the United States varies widely from one region to the next, and even across hospitals within the same community, studies have shown. However, this new analysis is believed to be the first to assess spending differences between physicians within the same hospital, and patient ... Read more

Related support groups: Hip Replacement, Diagnosis and Investigation, Body Imaging, Head Imaging

Some Hospitals May Overcharge for Hip, Knee Replacements: Study

Posted 28 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Feb. 28, 2017 – Some U.S. hospitals might be charging private insurers twice as much for knee and hip replacements as the implants typically cost, new research suggests. It's not clear why the discrepancy exists, and an official with a national trade association of hospitals cautioned against drawing too many conclusions from a finding that only involved one insurer. Still, study co-author Dr. Kenneth Mandl said the results raise questions, especially regarding the fact that insurers aren't told how much the implants actually cost the hospitals. "Billions of dollars are at stake when the true cost of the devices are hidden," said Mandl, director of the Computational Health Informatics Program at Boston Children's Hospital. Mandl said his team wanted to find out what happens when hospitals charge private insurers for joint implants without disclosing the model numbers or cost. ... Read more

Related support groups: Knee Joint Replacement, Hip Replacement, Orthopedic Surgery

Hip Fracture's Link to Early Death May Last Years

Posted 28 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Feb. 27, 2017 – Older people who suffer a hip fracture face a much higher risk of death soon after the injury, but the risk persists over the longer term, a large study indicates. Researchers found that the risk of death among people over 60 nearly tripled during the first year following a hip fracture. However, hip fractures were also still linked to a nearly twofold increased risk of dying eight years or more after the injury. The new findings are similar to those of previous studies on hip fracture, said study lead author Michail Katsoulis. He's a medical statistician with the Hellenic Health Foundation in Athens, Greece. Katsoulis noted that "post-operative complications, such as cardiac and pulmonary ones, have been mostly implicated for the excess short-term mortality after the fracture, that is within the first year after." Those complications included both blood clots ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Heart Disease, Hip Replacement, Fracture, bone, Orthopedic Surgery, Diabetes Mellitus

Health Tip: Give Your Kids Bone-Building Food

Posted 16 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

-- Building stronger bones should begin in childhood and continue for the rest of your child's life. The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics suggests these foods: Offer a good source of calcium at each meal, such as milk, cheese, yogurt, almonds, figs, broccoli, soybeans, turnip greens or tofu with calcium added. Seek natural sunshine for more vitamin D. Also offer eggs, fatty fish and fortified foods, such as milk and orange juice. Ask your pediatrician if your child needs vitamin D supplements. Give your child edamame, black beans, spinach, peanut butter, almonds, kidney beans, avocado and whole-wheat bread, which are good sources of magnesium. Offer green beans, peas or leafy green veggies (such as kale, broccoli and spinach) for vitamin K. Read more

Related support groups: Osteoporosis, Hip Replacement, Fracture, bone, Prevention of Osteoporosis, Orthopedic Surgery, Osteopenia, Caltrate 600 with D, Paget's Disease, Compression Fracture of Vertebral Column, Calcium/Vitamin D, Citracal + D, Citracal Petites, Oysco 500 with D, Osteomalacia, Calcium 600 D, Citracal Creamy Bites, Calcet, Oyster Shell Calcium, Calcarb with D, Sedecal D

U.S. Doctors Trained Overseas Have Slightly Better Patient Outcomes

Posted 6 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Feb. 3, 2017 – Death rates are lower for older Americans treated by doctors trained in other countries than by those who went to a U.S. medical school, a new study reports. That finding held true even though foreign-trained doctors are more likely to care for patients with more chronic health problems. The results of this study should dispel Americans' concerns about the quality of care provided by doctors trained in other countries, the researchers said. The study included information from more than 1.2 million Medicare patients aged 65 and older. All had been admitted to the hospital between 2011 and 2014. The 30-day death rate was 11.2 percent for patients treated by foreign-trained doctors and 11.6 percent for those treated by U.S.-trained doctors, the investigators found. There was no difference in patient hospital readmission rates. But the cost of care was slightly ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Hip Replacement, Orthopedic Surgery, Head & Neck Surgery, Vascular Surgery, Cardiothoracic Surgery

Even a Little Exercise Can Help With Arthritis, Study Says

Posted 31 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Jan. 31, 2017 – Just a little physical activity seems to go a long way toward helping older adults with arthritis remain able to do daily tasks, a new study finds. Older adults with arthritis-related joint pain and stiffness need to keep moving to remain functionally independent. But only 10 percent of older Americans with arthritis in their knees meet federal guidelines of at least 150 minutes of moderate activity a week, the researchers said. However, this Northwestern University study found that doing even about one-third of that amount is still beneficial. The study involved more than 1,600 adults 49 or older who had arthritic pain or stiffness in their hips, knees or feet. Those who did a minimum of 45 minutes of moderate activity – such as brisk walking – a week were 80 percent more likely to improve or sustain physical function and gait speed over two years, compared ... Read more

Related support groups: Pain, Back Pain, Rheumatoid Arthritis, Osteoarthritis, Chronic Pain, Ibuprofen, Naproxen, Meloxicam, Advil, Diclofenac, Voltaren, Neck Pain, Aleve, Mobic, Motrin, Hip Replacement, Indomethacin, Toradol, Etodolac, Nabumetone

Work Disability Benefits? Depends on the Doc

Posted 26 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Jan. 26, 2017 – Medical professionals give widely varying opinions about whether claimants for work disability benefits should get those benefits, researchers report. After a disabling illness or injury, many workers seek benefits to replace their lost wages. Insurers provide benefits for employees who are evaluated and deemed eligible. Medical professionals are hired by insurers to evaluate these employees, but there have been concerns about the quality of these evaluations, the researchers explained. The research team, led by Dr. Regina Kunz from the University of Basel in Switzerland, analyzed 23 studies conducted between 1992 and 2016 in 12 countries in North America, Europe, Australia, the Middle East and Asia. In 63 percent of the studies, there was only low to moderate agreement in medical experts' opinions about disability benefits claimants' ability to work. Higher ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Attack, Knee Joint Replacement, Hip Replacement, Myocardial Infarction, Prevention of Falls

Knee Cartilage Product Approved to Repair Defects

Posted 14 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 14, 2016 – Maci (autologous cultured chondrocytes) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to repair defective cartilage of the knee. The treatment, derived from healthy cartilage from the patient's own knee, uses tissue engineering to grow cells that replace the damaged cartilage, the agency said in a news release. Cartilage defects commonly stem from an injury, knee strain, overuse, muscle weakness or general wear-and-tear, the FDA said. The new process uses the patient's own (autologous) cells, which are placed on a collagen membrane scaffolding that is surgically implanted over the area where damaged cartilage was removed. The membrane is designed to be absorbed by the body over time. The surgeon installing the implants should be trained in the Maci product. Multiple implants can be used if there is more than one defect, the FDA said. Maci's ... Read more

Related support groups: Knee Joint Replacement, Hip Replacement, Orthopedic Surgery

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