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Related terms: Total hip replacement, Hip arthroplasty

Knee Cartilage Product Approved to Repair Defects

Posted 14 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 14, 2016 – Maci (autologous cultured chondrocytes) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to repair defective cartilage of the knee. The treatment, derived from healthy cartilage from the patient's own knee, uses tissue engineering to grow cells that replace the damaged cartilage, the agency said in a news release. Cartilage defects commonly stem from an injury, knee strain, overuse, muscle weakness or general wear-and-tear, the FDA said. The new process uses the patient's own (autologous) cells, which are placed on a collagen membrane scaffolding that is surgically implanted over the area where damaged cartilage was removed. The membrane is designed to be absorbed by the body over time. The surgeon installing the implants should be trained in the Maci product. Multiple implants can be used if there is more than one defect, the FDA said. Maci's ... Read more

Related support groups: Hip Replacement, Knee Joint Replacement, Orthopedic Surgery

Less Than Half of Older Hip Fracture Patients Fully Recover: Study

Posted 26 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Oct. 25, 2016 – For older adults, a fractured hip is often life-changing: The majority will never return to their former levels of independence and physical activity, according to new research. "We all hope for full recovery, but less than half recover to their previous function after a hip fracture," said Dr. Victoria Tang, lead author of the study. The chances of recovery among hip-fracture patients older than 85 with dementia or other health problems are even lower, the study authors found. "By being able to set realistic expectations of the likelihood of recovery, as family members, we can take steps to plan and prepare for future care needs of the patient," added Tang. She is medical director of the geriatric surgery wellness program at the University of California, San Francisco. For older adults, the odds of suffering a hip fracture increase as bones tend to weaken. The ... Read more

Related support groups: Hip Replacement, Fracture, bone, Compression Fracture of Vertebral Column, Prevention of Fractures

Elective Surgeries on Fridays Are Safe: Study

Posted 18 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Oct. 18, 2016 – People having elective surgery on Fridays are no more likely to die than people who undergo procedures any other weekday, a large Canadian study suggests. Prior studies have shown a higher risk of death among patients opting for surgery on Fridays, the authors behind the new study said. One British study found a 44 percent increase in death risk among patients who had surgery on a Friday as compared to a Monday. Canadian investigators wanted to determine whether this "weekday effect" was real. Are surgeons who operate on Fridays less experienced? Does that inexperience translate into worse outcomes? The researchers examined close to 403,000 elective, daytime surgical procedures performed by nearly 1,700 different surgeons at Ontario hospitals over a 10-year period – from 2002 to 2012. "Yes, surgeons who operate on Friday are less experienced than those that ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Hip Replacement, Orthopedic Surgery

Seniors With Hip Fractures Fare Better in Large Teaching Hospitals: Study

Posted 17 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Oct. 17, 2016 – Seniors with hip fractures may be more likely to die if they're treated in smaller community hospitals than in large teaching hospitals, a new Canadian study suggests. About 10 percent of hip fracture patients in Canada die in the hospital, but little is known about how changes to patient care could improve survival, the study authors said. Researchers examined data from more than 168,000 patients 65 and older in Canada who were hospitalized with a first hip fracture between January 2004 and December 2012. For every 1,000 patients admitted to a hospital with a hip fracture, 43 more died at small hospitals (fewer than 50 beds) and 14 more died at medium-sized hospitals (50 to 199 beds) than at larger teaching hospitals, the study found. For every 1,000 patients who had surgery to repair their hip fracture, 11 more died at medium-sized hospitals than at teaching ... Read more

Related support groups: Hip Replacement, Fracture, bone, Prevention of Falls, Prevention of Fractures

Encouraging Surgical ICU Patients to Get Moving Pays Off

Posted 2 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Sept. 30, 2016 – Getting out of bed and moving around as soon as possible benefits surgical intensive care unit patients, a new study shows. Among 200 surgical ICU patients in the United States, Germany and Austria, those encouraged to move around sooner than usual were discharged from the ICU and the hospital earlier than others, researchers found. "We have become much more successful in making sure patients hospitalized after serious injury or major surgery survive their stays in surgical ICUs," said study leader Dr. Matthias Eikermann, of Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. "But many patients who spend a long time in the ICU develop muscle weakness that can lead to prolonged rehabilitation requirements, with some being unable to walk or take care of themselves up to a year after hospital discharge," he said in a hospital news release. Setting daily goals for each ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Hip Replacement, Knee Joint Replacement, Orthopedic Surgery, Surgical Prophylaxis

Health Tip: Is Arthritis Affecting Your Hip?

Posted 25 Jul 2016 by Drugs.com

-- Slowing down with occasional aches and pains in your hip may be a common sign of aging. But other symptoms may indicate hip arthritis. The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons says warning signs of hip arthritis include: Pain that starts in the thigh or groin and extends to the knee or buttock. Pain that worsens when you exercise vigorously. Difficulty bending at the hip. Difficulty walking. A grinding sound or sensation in the joint, or a tendency for the hip to stick or lock in place. Reduced range of motion of the hip joint, causing a limp. Joint pain that worsens when it rains. Read more

Related support groups: Osteoarthritis, Hip Replacement, Prevention of Fractures

Cartilage Grown in Lab Might One Day Help Younger Arthritis Sufferers

Posted 19 Jul 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, July 19, 2016 – Scientists report progress toward developing lab-grown cartilage that could postpone or possibly eliminate the need for hip replacement surgery in younger arthritis patients. The cartilage hasn't been tested in humans yet, and it's too early to know anything about side effects or cost. Still, the researchers said it's promising because the cartilage is only partially artificial – it also includes the patient's stem cells – and the synthetic "scaffolding" may vanish over time, leaving only human tissue in its place. In addition, the implant is designed to fight off swelling, said lead researcher Bradley Estes. He is vice president of research and development at Cytex Therapeutics, the Durham, N.C.-based company developing the cartilage. "We have an implant that can functionally replace the diseased tissue, while also fighting off inflammation that could ... Read more

Related support groups: Osteoarthritis, Hip Replacement, Diagnosis and Investigation

Health Tip: Exercising After Joint Replacement

Posted 28 Jun 2016 by Drugs.com

-- Having joint replacement surgery doesn't mean exercise is out of the picture. The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons offers these guidelines: Your doctor may have restrictions on your exercise regimen, so always consult your doctor before you exercise after surgery. Until your doctor says it's OK, don't jog, ski, run or do other exercises that put the replaced joint under stress. Opt for less-stressful exercises such as swimming, doubles tennis, golf and biking. Read more

Related support groups: Hip Replacement, Knee Joint Replacement

Minimally Invasive Hip Surgery Isn't Always the Right Choice

Posted 4 Jun 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, June 3, 2016 – Minimally invasive hip surgery may not always be the best option to relieve serious, ongoing hip pain, a new study suggests. Researchers found that more than one-third of people in their 60s who had the minimally invasive procedure – known as hip arthroscopy – ended up needing a hip replacement within two years. Hip arthroscopy relies on small incisions around the hip to allow for the insertion of a tiny camera, as well as surgical tools, according to the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS). Hip arthroscopy can be used to treat a number of painful conditions, the AAOS says. For example, the procedure can be used to repair torn cartilage or remove extra bone that occurs in the very earliest stages of osteoarthritis, explained Dr. Stuart Weinstein. "Hip arthroscopy has been an amazing development and has helped many patients with hip disorders," said ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Hip Replacement, Orthopedic Surgery

Refugees Aren't Getting Needed Surgeries

Posted 3 Jun 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, June 2, 2016 – Millions of refugees aren't getting the surgery they need, researchers report. "When planning to take care of refugees, much thought is put into how to house and feed and clothe people who are far from home for circumstances often beyond their control. But surgery is a basic need and nobody talks about this," said Dr. Adam Kushner, leader of a new study conducted at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health in Baltimore. An analysis of data from the United Nations and other sources estimates that the roughly 60 million refugees worldwide may need at least 2.8 million surgeries a year. But their circumstances make it difficult to receive that type of medical care, the researchers added. The types of surgeries required range from broken bones and hernia repair to cesarean sections, cleft lips, gallbladder removal and burn care, the study found. The ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Hip Replacement, Knee Joint Replacement, Orthopedic Surgery, Hiatal Hernia, Inguinal Hernia, Surgical Prophylaxis, Cesarean Section, Cardiothoracic Surgery

Getting Active After Knee Replacement Might Raise Hip Fracture Risk

Posted 18 Apr 2016 by Drugs.com

SATURDAY, April 16, 2016 – There could be a downside to knee replacement: As people get more active, their odds for hip and spinal fractures rise, a new study suggests. One expert wasn't surprised by the finding. While the exact reason for the increase in hip and spine fractures isn't clear, it's most likely due "to improved mobility and activity as a result of the knee replacement surgery," said Dr. Caroline Messer, who specializes in bone loss at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City. "In addition, patients who chose to have the surgery rather than conservative management of osteoarthritis may have been the same individuals who were determined to lead very active and therefore somewhat riskier lifestyles in the future," said Messer, who directs the hospital's Center for Pituitary and Neuroendocrine Disorders. Almost 720,000 total knee replacements are carried out in the United States ... Read more

Related support groups: Hip Replacement, Knee Joint Replacement, Fracture, bone, Compression Fracture of Vertebral Column, Prevention of Fractures

Mediterranean Diet May Help Lower Hip Fracture Risk in Older Women

Posted 28 Mar 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, March 28, 2016 – Eating a Mediterranean diet may at least slightly lower an older woman's risk for hip fracture, a new study suggests. Women who most closely followed a Mediterranean diet – one high in fruits, vegetables, nuts, legumes and whole grains – had a 20 percent lower risk for hip fractures compared to women who didn't follow this regimen, the researchers found. The study couldn't prove cause-and-effect, however. And the researchers stressed that the absolute reduction in risk of a hip fracture for any one woman was still pretty slight – only about a third of one percent. Nevertheless, "these results support the notion that following a healthy dietary pattern may play a role in the maintenance of bone health in postmenopausal women," concluded a research team led by Dr. Bernhard Haring of the University of Wurzburg in Germany. The study was published online March 28 ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Weight Loss, Hip Replacement

Injuries More Common in Teens Who Focus on Single Sport

Posted 28 Mar 2016 by Drugs.com

SATURDAY, March 26, 2016 – High school athletes who focus on a single sport may be at increased risk for knee and hip injuries, a new study suggests. "Make sure your children are getting breaks in competition," said study author David Bell, assistant professor in the Departments of Kinesiology and Orthopedics and Rehabilitation at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. "There are so many great aspects to sports participation and we don't want this information to scare athletes or parents – we just want them to be wise consumers and to participate as safely as possible," he said in a university news release. The study included more than 300 athletes at two high schools, one large and one small. About 36 percent of the athletes had high levels of sports specialization. Nearly 29 percent had moderate specialization, and about 35 percent had low specialization, the researchers said. The ... Read more

Related support groups: Hip Replacement, Knee Joint Replacement, Fracture, bone, Orthopedic Surgery

Acetaminophen Won't Help Arthritis Pain, Study Finds

Posted 18 Mar 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, March 17, 2016 – Acetaminophen – commonly known as Tylenol in the United States – isn't an effective choice for relieving osteoarthritis pain in the hip or knee, or for improving joint function, a new study finds. Although the drug rated slightly better than placebo in studies, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin) or diclofenac are better choices for short-term pain relief, the researchers said. "Regardless of dose, the prescription drug diclofenac is the most effective drug among painkillers in terms of improving pain and function in osteoarthritis," said lead researcher Dr. Sven Trelle. He's co-director of clinical trials at the University of Bern in Switzerland. However, even diclofenac comes with side effects. "If you are thinking of using a painkiller for osteoarthritis, you should consider diclofenac," Trelle said, but also ... Read more

Related support groups: Pain, Percocet, Vicodin, Norco, Osteoarthritis, Lortab, Tylenol, Ibuprofen, Naproxen, Meloxicam, Acetaminophen, Advil, Diclofenac, Voltaren, Aleve, Mobic, Voltaren Gel, Paracetamol, Fioricet, Motrin

After Hip Replacement, Therapy at Home May Be Effective

Posted 4 Mar 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, March 4, 2016 – Surgeons often recommend outpatient physical therapy to help hip replacement patients get moving again, but researchers report that a home exercise program may work just as well. Experts say that physical therapy plays a vital role in recovery after hip replacement. And this new study of 77 patients found they obtained similar results no matter which therapy option they pursued after receiving their new hip. "Our research found that the physical therapy does not necessarily need to be supervised by a physical therapist [for hip replacement patients]," said study author Dr. Matthew Austin, director of joint-replacement services at Rothman Orthopaedic Specialty Hospital in Bensalem, Pa. "The expense and time required of outpatient physical therapy, both for the patient and the patient's caretakers, may not be the most efficient use of resources." More than 300,000 ... Read more

Related support groups: Hip Replacement, Deep Vein Thrombosis Prophylaxis after Hip Replacement Surgery, Deep Vein Thrombosis/Pulmonary Embolism Prophylaxis Following Hip Replacement Surgery

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