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Related terms: Cholesteremia, Cholesterol, Elevated Levels, Cholesterol, High, Cholesterolemia, Familial Hypercholesterolemia, Hypercholesterolemia, Hypercholesterolemia, Familial, Hyperlipidemia, Lipid Metabolism Disorders

Health Tip: Health Risks of Childhood Obesity

Posted 29 Sep 2016 by

-- Obesity among children can lead to numerous health problems now and for many years to come. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says obese children are at greater risk of developing: High blood pressure and high cholesterol. Type 2 diabetes, insulin resistance and impaired fasting glucose. Asthma, sleep apnea and other breathing problems. Pain and discomfort of the joints and musculoskeletal system. Gallstones, heartburn and fatty liver disease. Behavioral problems, depression, poor self-esteem, poor quality of life and poor school performance. More Information See The Shape Of Things To Come – 8 Reasons Why Obesity Needs To Be Tackled Now for more information. Read more

Related support groups: Pain, Depression, High Blood Pressure, Diabetes, Type 2, Obesity, Hypertension, High Cholesterol, Indigestion, Insulin Resistance, Sleep Apnea, Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease, Psychiatric Disorders, Pre-Diabetes, Gallstones, Diabetes Mellitus, Obstructive Sleep Apnea/Hypopnea Syndrome, Hypertensive Heart Disease, Executive Function Disorder

Are There Alternatives to Statins?

Posted 27 Sep 2016 by

TUESDAY, Sept. 27, 2016 – Statins are the go-to therapy for lowering "bad" LDL cholesterol, but other treatments also can effectively reduce risk of future heart problems, a new evidence review reports. These alternative therapies – including a heart-healthy diet, other cholesterol-lowering medications, and even intestinal bypass surgery – seem to confer the same level of heart health protection as statins when cholesterol levels decrease, according to the findings. Nonstatin therapies reduced the risk of heart problems by 25 percent for each 1 millimole per liter (mmol/L) decrease in LDL cholesterol levels. That's very similar to the 23 percent reduction per 1 mmol/L decrease seen with statins like atorvastatin (Lipitor) and simvastatin (Zocor), the researchers said. What's more, the benefits of these therapies stack up if more than one proves effective at lowering a person's ... Read more

Related support groups: High Cholesterol, Lipitor, Simvastatin, Crestor, Atorvastatin, Pravastatin, Welchol, Zocor, Cholestyramine, Lovastatin, Zetia, Vytorin, Rosuvastatin, High Cholesterol - Familial Heterozygous, Hypertriglyceridemia, Gastric Bypass Surgery, Questran, Pravachol, High Cholesterol - Familial Homozygous, Livalo

'Spare Tire' May Be Tougher on Your Heart Than 'Love Handles'

Posted 26 Sep 2016 by

MONDAY, Sept. 26, 2016 – Belly fat – especially hidden fat deep in the gut – may indicate increased risk for heart disease, a new study suggests. The six-year study of more than 1,000 adults found people with a "spare tire" in their midsection had a greater risk for heart disease compared to those with visible flab elsewhere under the skin – or "love handles." "Adipose tissue [fat in the stomach] along with fat below the skin has been associated with abnormalities, including high triglyceride levels, low HDL levels [good cholesterol], high blood pressure and greater risk of diabetes," said Dr. Gregg Fonarow. He is a professor of cardiology at the University of California, Los Angeles, and had no part in the new study but is familiar with the findings. The study looked at abdominal fat quantity and quality. The researchers cautioned, however, that the study only showed an association ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, High Cholesterol, Weight Loss, Hypertriglyceridemia

Severe Obesity and Heart Failure

Posted 16 Sep 2016 by

FRIDAY, Sept. 16, 2016 – Severe obesity appears to be an independent risk factor for heart failure, a new study suggests. Researchers from Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore reviewed data from more than 13,000 American adults, average age 54. After accounting for other risk factors such as high blood pressure, high cholesterol and diabetes, the researchers concluded that severe (morbid) obesity was a stand-alone risk factor for heart failure. Heart failure occurs when the heart is weakened and cannot pump blood sufficiently to take care of the body's needs. Severe obesity is defined as having a body mass index of 40 or higher, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Body mass index is a rough estimate of a person's body fat. A BMI of 25 or below is generally considered normal weight. Someone who is 5 feet 9 inches tall would have to weigh 271 pounds or more ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Diabetes, Type 2, Obesity, Hypertension, High Cholesterol, Heart Failure, Congestive Heart Failure, Left Ventricular Dysfunction

Over 64? Want to Cut Your Heart Disease Risk? Try Exercise

Posted 29 Aug 2016 by

MONDAY, Aug. 29, 2016 – Ride a bike, take a swim, walk your dog: New research shows even a "moderate" amount of exercise each week drastically reduces the odds a person aged 65 or older will die from heart disease. The benefits of exercise are "good prevention for many diseases, and the effect is dose-dependent – the more you do, the better," said study lead author Riitta Antikainen. She is a professor of geriatrics at the University of Oulu in Finland. Antikainen's team wanted to quantify the benefits of exercise on health over the long term. To do so, her group tracked the health outcomes of almost 2,500 Finnish people aged 65 and older for almost 12 years. None of the participants had a serious chronic illness at the start of the study. About 1,600 did at least moderate exercise, Antikainen said. Based on questionnaires, the research team assessed each participant as a low, ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Hypertension, High Cholesterol, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Hypertensive Heart Disease

How Long Will You Live? Look to Your Parents

Posted 15 Aug 2016 by

MONDAY, Aug. 15, 2016 – Children of long-lived parents are less likely than others to die from heart disease in their 70s, new British research suggests. "We found that for each parent that lived beyond 70 years of age, the participants had a 20 percent lower chance of dying from heart disease," said study co-author Luke Pilling, a research fellow in epidemiology and public health at the University of Exeter Medical School. Specifically, the children of longer-lived parents had lower rates of vascular disease, heart failure, stroke, high blood pressure and high cholesterol, the study found. The findings aren't an excuse to turn into a binge-eating couch potato if your mother and father reached their 80s or 90s. Nor are they a sign that those whose parents died early should just give up. On the contrary, your decisions about your health can reverse trends toward the illnesses ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Hypertension, High Cholesterol, Hypertriglyceridemia, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Hypertensive Emergency, Hypertensive Heart Disease

Task Force Calls for More Study Into Risks, Benefits of Kids' Cholesterol Screening

Posted 9 Aug 2016 by

TUESDAY, Aug. 9, 2016 – There's not enough evidence to determine the potential benefits or risks of screening for high cholesterol in children and teens without symptoms, signs or a known diagnosis, experts say. For that reason, no recommendation can be made for or against such screening, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) said in a statement released Aug. 9. High cholesterol (lipid disorder) in people 20 years or younger can be caused by genetics as well as factors such as a high fat diet. The task force reviewed evidence for screening children and teens for lipid disorders associated with both causes. "We are calling for more research to better understand the benefits and harms of screening and treatment of lipid disorders in children and teens and on the impact these interventions may have on their cardiovascular health as adults," task force vice chairman Dr. David ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, High Cholesterol, Weight Loss, Diagnosis and Investigation

6 Million Americans Drink Carcinogen-Tainted Water: Report

Posted 9 Aug 2016 by

TUESDAY, Aug. 9, 2016 – Millions of Americans are exposed to unsafe levels of dangerous chemicals in their drinking water that may trigger a host of health problems, researchers report. Those health problems can range from cancer to higher cholesterol levels to compromised immune systems and hormonal disruptions, the scientists said. The levels of these chemicals, known as polyfluoroalkyl and perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs), exceed government-recommended safety levels for at least 6 million people in the United States, the study found. "These chemicals may have complicated names, but people are exposed to them in nonstick cookware and packaging – things we use in our lives," said lead researcher Cindy Hu, from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health's department of environmental health. "These chemicals have concerning health effects, and drinking water is one of the main ways ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, High Cholesterol, Poisoning, Toxic Reactions Incl Drug and Substance Abuse

Heart Risk Factors Rise Before Menopause

Posted 3 Aug 2016 by

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 3, 2016 – Heart disease risk factors – such as abnormal cholesterol levels and high blood pressure – appear to increase before a woman goes through menopause, not after, new research finds. "These risk factors related to heart disease and stroke appear to worsen rapidly in the years leading up to menopause, and during the postmenopausal period they progress less rapidly," said Dr. Mark DeBoer, the study's senior author. He's an associate professor of pediatric endocrinology at the University of Virginia. In the past, he said, experts believed that a rapid increase in heart disease and stroke risk factors took place in women after menopause. They thought this was when women "catch up" to men's risk. However, the new research finds the rapid increase in risk factors starts well before the last menstrual period. The real danger zone, DeBoer's team concluded, was before ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Hypertension, Hot Flashes, High Cholesterol, Menopausal Disorders, Postmenopausal Symptoms, Perimenopausal Symptoms, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Dyspareunia, Vaginal Dryness, Hypertensive Heart Disease

Fat May Not Hike Heart Attack Risk: Study

Posted 1 Aug 2016 by

MONDAY, Aug. 1, 2016 – In a study that challenges a commonly accepted belief, Swedish researchers contend that obesity may not increase the risk of heart attack or premature death. Their study of identical twins looked at cases where one twin was overweight or obese and the other was trimmer. "The heavier twin had a lower risk of heart attack or death than the leaner twin. However, as expected, the heavier twin had a higher risk of diabetes," said lead researcher Peter Nordstrom. He's chief physician in the department of community medicine and rehabilitation at Umea University. "Lifestyle factors that decrease the amount of fatness may not reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease or death, although it will reduce the risk of [type 2] diabetes," Nordstrom added. Because identical twins are genetically the same, they provide a unique tool for evaluating risks associated with obesity ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Obesity, Hypertension, High Cholesterol, Weight Loss, Diabetes Mellitus, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Hypertensive Heart Disease

FDA Approves Repatha (evolocumab) Pushtronex - First And Only Single Monthly Injection for a PCSK9 Inhibitor

Posted 1 Aug 2016 by

THOUSAND OAKS, Calif., July 11, 2016 /PRNewswire/ – Amgen (NASDAQ:AMGN) today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved the Repatha® (evolocumab) Pushtronex™ system (on-body infusor with prefilled cartridge), a new, monthly single-dose administration option.1 The Pushtronex system is a hands-free device designed to provide 420 mg of Repatha in a single dose. Repatha is a human monoclonal antibody that blocks a protein called proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9), which inhibits the body's natural system for eliminating "bad" cholesterol (low-density lipoprotein cholesterol or LDL-C) from the blood.1 Repatha is the first and only PCSK9 inhibitor to offer a monthly single-dose delivery option. Repatha (evolocumab) Pushtronex system (on-body infusor with prefilled cartridge) "The Pushtronex system exemplifies Amgen's continued innovation and c ... Read more

Related support groups: High Cholesterol, High Cholesterol - Familial Heterozygous, Repatha, Evolocumab

Treating Psoriasis May Reduce Risk for Other Ills

Posted 29 Jul 2016 by

FRIDAY, July 29, 2016 – Treating the skin disease psoriasis might reduce your risk for other health problems as well, a dermatology expert says. About 7.5 million people in the United States have the chronic skin disease. The inflammatory effects of psoriasis can affect the entire body, said Dr. Jashin Wu, director of dermatology research at Kaiser Permanente Los Angeles Medical Center. "People with psoriasis, particularly those with more severe disease, have an increased risk for a variety of other health problems, including obesity, diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, stroke and heart attack," he said in an American Academy of Dermatology news release. Psoriasis is characterized by red, raised patches of skin, or plaques, covered with silvery-white scales. It's also marked by itching, burning or soreness of the skin. It is not contagious. "Psoriasis patients, even those ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Diabetes, Type 2, Obesity, Hypertension, High Cholesterol, Heart Attack, Psoriasis, Inflammatory Conditions, Insulin Resistance, Pre-Diabetes, Myocardial Infarction, Plaque Psoriasis, Diabetes Mellitus, Abnormal Glucose Tolerance, Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis, Psoriatic Arthropathy

Lack of Fitness Second Only to Smoking as Predictor of Early Death: Study

Posted 27 Jul 2016 by

WEDNESDAY, July 27, 2016 – Poor physical fitness ranks right behind smoking as leading risk factors for an early death, new long-term research suggests. Analyzing nearly 800 men starting at midlife, Swedish scientists also found that each measurable increase in fitness levels translated into a 21 percent lower risk of death over 45 years of follow-up. "Fitness in middle age is of importance for mortality risk for several decades," said study author Per Ladenvall, a researcher in the department of molecular and clinical medicine at University of Gothenburg. "Persons with low fitness are associated with an increased mortality risk throughout life." "Smoking was the risk factor that was [most strongly] associated with mortality," Ladenvall added. "We were somewhat surprised that the effect of aerobic capacity was even more pronounced than that of high cholesterol and high blood pressure." ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Hypertension, Smoking, High Cholesterol, Smoking Cessation, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction

9 Out of 10 Strokes Could Be Prevented, Study Finds

Posted 16 Jul 2016 by

FRIDAY, July 15, 2016 – Stroke is a leading cause of death and disability but the vast majority of strokes are preventable, according to a new study. Researchers discovered that 10 controllable risk factors account for 90 percent of all strokes worldwide. Of these modifiable risk factors, high blood pressure (hypertension) is the most important. "The study confirms that hypertension is the most important modifiable risk factor in all regions, and the key target in reducing the burden of stroke globally," said study co-leader Dr. Martin O'Donnell. He is an associate clinical professor in the Population Health Research Institute at McMaster University in Hamilton, Canada, and the HRB-Clinical Research Facility in Galway, Ireland. Preventing strokes is a major public health priority and strategies for reducing people's risk should be based on key preventable causes of stroke, the ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Anxiety and Stress, Diabetes, Type 2, Obesity, Hypertension, Smoking, Ischemic Stroke, High Cholesterol, Smoking Cessation, Transient Ischemic Attack, Pre-Diabetes, Alcoholism, Diabetes Mellitus, Ischemic Stroke - Prophylaxis, Intracranial Hemorrhage, Abnormal Glucose Tolerance, Hypertensive Heart Disease, Acute Alcohol Intoxication

Rising Blood Sugar Hitting More Obese Adults

Posted 14 Jul 2016 by

WEDNESDAY, July 13, 2016 – Among obese American adults, control of blood sugar is worsening, leading to more diabetes and heart disease, a new study finds. While blood pressure and cholesterol levels stayed relatively stable among obese adults, poor control of blood sugar led to a 37 percent increase in heart disease risk factors between 1988 and 2014, the researchers reported. "Obese adults with cardiovascular disease risk factors may need more intense approaches – healthy diet, increased physical activity – to control blood sugar and achieve weight loss," said lead researcher Dr. Fangjian Guo. He is an assistant professor of obstetrics and gynecology at the University of Texas in Galveston. After climbing over several decades, U.S. obesity rates have leveled off. Still, about 35 percent of American adults are obese, according to background notes with the study. Obesity hinders the ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Diabetes, Type 2, Obesity, Hypertension, High Cholesterol, Weight Loss, Pre-Diabetes, Diabetes Mellitus, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Abnormal Glucose Tolerance, Hypertensive Heart Disease

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