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Risk of Opioid Addiction Up 37 Percent Among Young U.S. Adults

Posted 4 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Oct. 4, 2016 – Young adults in the United States are more likely to become addicted to prescription opioids than they were in years past. And they're more likely to use heroin, too, a new study says. A review of federal data found the odds of becoming dependent on opioids like Vicodin and Percocet increased 37 percent among 18- to 25-year-olds between 2002 and 2014. The study was conducted by researchers from Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health in New York City. A grim picture emerged among slightly older adults, too: Risk of an opioid use disorder more than doubled among 26- to 34-year-olds, increasing from 11 percent to 24 percent, the study found. "Our analyses present the evidence to raise awareness and urgency to address these rising and problematic trends among young adults," said study first author Dr. Silvia Martins, an associate professor of ... Read more

Related support groups: Oxycodone, Hydrocodone, Percocet, OxyContin, Vicodin, Norco, Opiate Dependence, Lortab, Heroin, Roxicodone, Drug Dependence, Endocet, Acetaminophen/Hydrocodone, Percocet 10/325, Vicoprofen, Hydromet, Roxicet, Acetaminophen/Oxycodone, Tussionex Pennkinetic, Lorcet 10/650

Veterans' Painkiller Abuse Can Raise Odds for Heroin Use

Posted 23 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Aug. 23, 2016 – Veterans who misuse narcotic painkillers may be at high risk for heroin use, a new study cautions. The research included nearly 3,400 U.S. veterans who had never misused painkillers or used heroin. Their health was followed for 10 years. During that time, 500 of them began using heroin. Of those, 77 percent misused opioid painkillers before they started using heroin. Other risk factors for heroin use included being male, being black and abusing stimulant drugs, the study found. The findings highlight the need for health care providers who treat veterans to watch closely for signs of opioid painkiller misuse, the researchers said. "This study quantifies the issue of starting painkiller misuse and heroin use in a specific, high-risk population – veterans around the U.S.," said corresponding author Brandon Marshall, an assistant professor in the School of Public ... Read more

Related support groups: Pain, Suboxone, Oxycodone, Hydrocodone, Methadone, Percocet, Tramadol, OxyContin, Vicodin, Norco, Fentanyl, Opiate Dependence, Morphine, Codeine, Lortab, Opiate Withdrawal, Chronic Pain, Opana, Subutex, Dilaudid

Steep Rise in U.S. Babies Born to Opioid-Addicted Mothers

Posted 11 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Aug. 11, 2016 – Triggered by a national epidemic of opioid painkiller abuse, the number of babies born with opioid withdrawal symptoms quadrupled in the United States between 1999 and 2013. That's the finding from a study of nearly 30 million births across 28 states, tracked by researchers at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The CDC team said better addiction-prevention efforts "are needed to reduce inappropriate prescribing and dispensing of opioids" to curb this increase in what's medically known as "neonatal abstinence syndrome." Common opioids of abuse include prescription painkillers such as OxyContin, Vicodin, Percocet and fentanyl, as well as illicit opioids such as heroin. Neonatal abstinence syndrome is an increasingly familiar sight in hospitals caring for newborns across the United States, the CDC researchers said. Newborns with the condition ... Read more

Related support groups: Percocet, OxyContin, Vicodin, Fentanyl, Opiate Dependence, Opiate Withdrawal, Heroin, Drug Dependence, Duragesic, Delivery, Substance Abuse, Actiq, Fentora, Duragesic-100, Toxic Reactions Incl Drug and Substance Abuse, Duragesic-25, Subsys, Duragesic-50, Fentanyl/Ropivacaine, Fentanyl Transdermal

Painkillers for Teen Athletes Won't Spur Addiction: Study

Posted 25 Jul 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, July 25, 2016 – Teenage athletes are less likely to abuse prescription painkillers than kids who don't play sports or exercise, a new study finds. The study results run counter to some research in recent years detailing concerns about injured teen athletes abusing opioid painkillers prescribed by doctors and then moving on to use heroin. Dr. Wilson Compton, deputy director of the U.S. National Institute on Drug Abuse, said he was "surprised" by the findings. He said, "A key risk (for teenage athletes) is a desire to please and for acceptance. But this study shows overall rates (of use) are declining." For the study, University of Michigan researchers examined data from nearly 192,000 students in 8th and 10th grade who participated in a federally funded study between 1997 and 2014. Over these years, doctors wrote many more opioid painkiller prescriptions for children and teens, ... Read more

Related support groups: Pain, Oxycodone, Back Pain, Hydrocodone, Percocet, OxyContin, Vicodin, Norco, Opiate Dependence, Lortab, Opiate Withdrawal, Heroin, Roxicodone, Drug Dependence, Endocet, Acetaminophen/Hydrocodone, Percocet 10/325, Vicoprofen, Hydromet, Roxicet

Implant Proves Effective at Combating Opioid Dependence

Posted 19 Jul 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, July 19, 2016 – Addicts are twice as likely to kick their dependence on heroin or prescription painkillers if they receive a new long-acting implant rather than a daily treatment pill, a new clinical trial shows. The implant, sold under the name Probuphine, is placed in the upper arm of recovering addicts and releases a steady six-month dose of buprenorphine. Buprenorphine is an anti-addiction drug designed to combat the cravings that come with opioids like heroin or powerful prescription painkillers like Percocet or OxyContin. Only 14 percent of patients with the implant slipped back into drug abuse during the clinical trial, compared with 28 percent of patients who took buprenorphine in its traditional pill form. "Everybody did really well, but the implants did a little bit more well," said lead researcher Dr. Richard Rosenthal, medical director of Mount Sinai Hospital's ... Read more

Related support groups: Opiate Dependence, Opiate Withdrawal, Heroin, Drug Dependence, Substance Abuse, Probuphine

Painkiller That Killed Prince Part of Dangerous Wave of New Synthetic Drugs

Posted 16 Jun 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, June 16, 2016 – The recent overdose death of rock legend Prince has brought renewed focus on the dangers posed by synthetic opioids – laboratory-created narcotics tweaked by chemists to produce potentially lethal highs while skirting U.S. drug laws. Prince Rogers Nelson, 57, died April 21 from an overdose of fentanyl, a drug often used to quell pain in cancer patients when traditional opioids prove ineffective. Despite its legitimate medical uses, fentanyl has acquired a growing reputation as a dangerous street drug thanks to at least a dozen synthetic variants now available to users, according to the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA). And fentanyl is only one of numerous synthetic opioids and designer drugs now flooding the illicit drug market in the United States, DEA acting chief Chuck Rosenberg warned during a U.S. Senate hearing last week. "We are trying to ... Read more

Related support groups: Fentanyl, Opiate Dependence, Morphine, Opiate Withdrawal, Heroin, MS Contin, Drug Dependence, Duragesic, Kadian, Substance Abuse, M O S, Avinza, Actiq, Embeda, MSIR, Fentora, Roxanol, Morphine IR, Duragesic-100, Toxic Reactions Incl Drug and Substance Abuse

Opioid Painkiller May Be New Treatment for Heroin Addicts

Posted 6 Apr 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, April 6, 2016 – Hydromorphone – an opioid painkiller – may be another treatment option for heroin addiction, a new Canadian study suggests. The research included more than 200 heroin addicts in Vancouver. They hadn't responded to commonly used treatments such as methadone or suboxone. This was the first study to assess the effectiveness of hydromorphone in treating heroin addiction, the researchers noted. The participants were randomly selected to receive injections of either hydromorphone or diacetylmorphine (pharmaceutical-grade prescription heroin). The injections were given in a clinic under the supervision of a health care professional. "Providing injectable opioids in specialized clinics under supervision ensures safety of both the patients and the community, and the provision of comprehensive care," lead investigator Eugenia Oviedo-Joekes, from the University of ... Read more

Related support groups: Opiate Dependence, Opiate Withdrawal, Dilaudid, Heroin, Drug Dependence, Hydromorphone, Exalgo, Opiate Adjunct, Toxic Reactions Incl Drug and Substance Abuse, Hydromorph Contin, Palladone, Dilaudid-HP, Hydrostat IR, Dilaudid Cough Syrup, Guaifenesin/Hydromorphone, Hydromorphone/ropivacaine, Bupivacaine/Hydromorphone

Anti-Addiction Drug May Help Curb Painkiller, Heroin Dependence

Posted 31 Mar 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, March 30, 2016 – The newer anti-addiction drug naltrexone may become an important weapon in the country's escalating addiction to opioid painkillers and heroin, a new study suggests. Researchers found that monthly injections of extended-release naltrexone – which blocks the euphoric effects of opioids – resulted in a significantly lower relapse rate among treated addicts compared to a similar group that didn't receive the drug. Additionally, during the six-month study there were no overdoses in the naltrexone group compared to five in the other group. Opioids – including prescription painkillers such as OxyContin, Vicodin and Percocet, as well as the street drug heroin – killed more than 28,000 people in 2014, a record high, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. "We thought this was a good approach to relapse prevention . . . but I was ... Read more

Related support groups: Pain, Oxycodone, Hydrocodone, Percocet, OxyContin, Vicodin, Norco, Opiate Dependence, Lortab, Opiate Withdrawal, Chronic Pain, Heroin, Roxicodone, Drug Dependence, Endocet, Acetaminophen/Hydrocodone, Percocet 10/325, Vicoprofen, Substance Abuse, Hydromet

Obama Administration Steps Up Efforts to Beat Painkiller, Heroin Epidemic

Posted 29 Mar 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, March 29, 2016 – The Obama administration announced Tuesday additional measures in its $1.1 billion funding request to expand medication-based treatment for Americans addicted to prescription painkillers and heroin. President Barack Obama is scheduled to propose the measures at the National Rx Drug Abuse & Heroin Summit in Atlanta. The White House said the increased initiative could offer hope to tens of thousands of Americans addicted to prescription painkillers, such as OxyContin, Vicodin and Percocet, as well as illegal drugs like heroin. "The President has made clear that addressing this epidemic is a priority for his Administration, and today's actions represent further steps to expand access to treatment, prevent overdose deaths and increase community prevention strategies," the White House said in a statement. Most of the funding requested from Congress would enable ... Read more

Related support groups: Pain, Oxycodone, Back Pain, Hydrocodone, Percocet, OxyContin, Vicodin, Norco, Opiate Dependence, Lortab, Opiate Withdrawal, Chronic Pain, Heroin, Roxicodone, Drug Dependence, Endocet, Acetaminophen/Hydrocodone, Percocet 10/325, Vicoprofen, Substance Abuse

Fatal Overdoses Rising From Sedatives Like Valium, Xanax

Posted 19 Feb 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Feb. 18, 2016 – While deaths from overdoses of heroin and narcotic painkillers like Oxycontin have surged in recent years, a new report finds the same thing is happening with widely used sedatives such as Xanax, Valium and Ativan. In 2013, overdoses from these drugs, called benzodiazepines, accounted for 31 percent of the nearly 23,000 deaths from prescription drug overdoses in the United States, researchers said. "As more benzodiazepines were prescribed, more people have died from overdoses involving these drugs," said study author Dr. Joanna Starrels, an associate professor of medicine at Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York City. "In 2013, more than 5 percent of American adults filled prescriptions for benzodiazepines," she said. "And the overdose death rate increased more than four times from 1996 to 2013." This epidemic hasn't received the attention it ... Read more

Related support groups: Xanax, Oxycodone, Hydrocodone, Methadone, Percocet, Tramadol, OxyContin, Fentanyl, Opiate Dependence, Morphine, Ativan, Valium, Codeine, Opana, Lorazepam, Alprazolam, Subutex, Dilaudid, Diazepam, Heroin

Did Painkiller Crackdown Cause Heroin Epidemic?

Posted 13 Jan 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 13, 2016 – Top U.S. drug researchers are challenging a leading theory about the nation's heroin epidemic, saying it's not a direct result of the crackdown on prescription painkillers such as OxyContin and Vicodin. The commentary, published in the Jan. 14 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine, is unlikely to resolve the debate, as other researchers disagree with the authors' conclusion. What they likely will agree on is that heroin's popularity is soaring – with more than 914,000 reported users in the United States in 2014, an increase of 145 percent since 2007, according to background notes with the commentary. This has led to a spike in overdose deaths – more than 10,500 in 2014. Some researchers and health officials point to recent limits on prescription painkillers as a likely cause of the heroin scourge. But the commentary authors said that the rise in ... Read more

Related support groups: Pain, Suboxone, Oxycodone, Back Pain, Hydrocodone, Methadone, Percocet, Tramadol, OxyContin, Vicodin, Norco, Fentanyl, Morphine, Codeine, Lortab, Chronic Pain, Muscle Pain, Opana, Subutex, Dilaudid

Drug Overdoses Hit Record High: CDC

Posted 18 Dec 2015 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Dec. 18, 2015 – Drug overdose deaths reached record highs in 2014, fueled largely by the abuse of narcotic painkillers and heroin, U.S. health officials reported Friday. In 2014, more than 47,000 Americans died from drug overdoses – a 14 percent increase over 2013. Since 2000, nearly half a million people have died from overdoses, according to a new report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. More than six out of 10 drug overdose deaths involved narcotics, including prescription painkillers and heroin, the report found. "The increasing number of deaths from opioid [narcotic] overdose is alarming," CDC director Dr. Tom Frieden said in a statement. "The opioid epidemic is devastating American families and communities. To curb these trends and save lives, we must help prevent addiction and provide support and treatment to those who suffer from opioid use ... Read more

Related support groups: Suboxone, Oxycodone, Hydrocodone, Methadone, Percocet, Tramadol, OxyContin, Vicodin, Norco, Fentanyl, Opiate Dependence, Morphine, Codeine, Lortab, Opiate Withdrawal, Opana, Subutex, Dilaudid, Heroin, Opana ER

Not Enough Needle Exchange Programs Outside Cities: Study

Posted 10 Dec 2015 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Dec. 10, 2015 – Injection drug users in rural and suburban areas have less access to needle exchange programs than those in cities do, even though addiction rates are rising in non-urban areas, a new study shows. Providing injection drug users with new, sterile needles and syringes in exchange for used ones reduces their risk of contracting or spreading infections such as HIV and hepatitis C, the researchers explained. Many needle exchange programs also provide naloxone, a medication that can reverse overdoses from heroin and narcotic painkillers. The researchers found that 69 percent of needle exchange programs in the United States were in cities, with only 20 percent in rural areas and 9 percent in suburban areas. The range of services provided by the programs in different locations also varied. For example, only 37 percent in rural areas offered naloxone, compared with 61 ... Read more

Related support groups: Opiate Dependence, Opiate Withdrawal, Heroin, Drug Dependence, Opiate Adjunct, Toxic Reactions Incl Drug and Substance Abuse, C-Topical Solution

More Americans Seek Treatment for Painkiller, Heroin Abuse

Posted 3 Dec 2015 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Dec. 3, 2015 – More American teens and adults are seeking treatment for heroin and prescription painkiller abuse, a new U.S. government report reveals. In 2013, heroin accounted for 19 percent of admissions to publicly funded substance-use treatment programs – up from 15 percent a decade earlier, the U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) reported. And admissions related to narcotic painkillers, such as OxyContin and Vicodin, jumped from 3 percent to 9 percent between 2003 and 2013, the report says. The report, released Thursday, reflects changing patterns of substance abuse in the United States among people 12 and older. Although alcohol is still the main reason people seek treatment, the proportion of booze-related admissions decreased from 42 percent to 38 percent during the study period. And overall, the report found that admissions for ... Read more

Related support groups: Pain, Suboxone, Oxycodone, Hydrocodone, Methadone, Percocet, Tramadol, OxyContin, Vicodin, Norco, Fentanyl, Opiate Dependence, Morphine, Codeine, Lortab, Opana, Subutex, Dilaudid, Heroin, Opana ER

Narcan Nasal Spray Approved to Counter Narcotic Painkiller Overdose

Posted 20 Nov 2015 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Nov. 19, 2015 – Narcan (naloxone hydrochloride) nasal spray has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to stop or reverse an overdose of opioids, a class of narcotic drugs that includes the prescription medication oxycodone (Oxycontin) and the illicit drug heroin. Symptoms of overdose with these drugs could include shallow breathing and difficulty waking a person. Drug overdoses have surpassed traffic accidents as the leading cause of injury death in the United States, the FDA said in a news release. Narcan, if given soon enough, can reverse the effects of an overdose in as little as two minutes, the agency said. The drug was approved previously as an injection. However, many first responders believe a nasal spray is easier to deliver and avoids the possibility of needle contamination, the FDA said. However, the drug is not meant to substitute for immediate ... Read more

Related support groups: Suboxone, Oxycodone, Hydrocodone, Methadone, Percocet, Tramadol, OxyContin, Vicodin, Norco, Fentanyl, Morphine, Codeine, Lortab, Opana, Subutex, Dilaudid, Heroin, Opana ER, Roxicodone, MS Contin

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