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U.S. Liver Cancer Deaths Have Doubled Since 1980s: Study

Posted 7 Jun 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, June 7, 2017 – Liver cancer is the fastest-growing cause of cancer deaths in the United States, a new study reports. Liver cancer cases have been on the rise since the mid-1970s, a trend expected to continue through at least 2030. Death rates from the disease have doubled since the mid-1980s – the fastest increase of any cancer, according to the American Cancer Society, which conducted the study. About 41,000 new cases of liver cancer and 29,000 deaths from the disease are projected in the United States this year, the cancer society said. Liver cancer is now the fifth-leading cause of cancer death in men and the eighth-leading cause in women. About 1 percent of people will be diagnosed with the disease during their lives. Only 1 in 5 survives five years after diagnosis, said the researchers led by Dr. Farhad Islami. Islami is strategic director of cancer surveillance ... Read more

Related support groups: Hepatitis C, Liver Cirrhosis, Hepatitis B Adult Vaccine, Liver and Pancreatic Disease, Twinrix, Hepatic Tumor, Vaccination and Prophlaxis, Hepatitis A Adult Vaccine/hepatitis B Adult Vaccine, Engerix-B

Obesity in Youth Tied to Higher Odds for Liver Cancer in Men

Posted 21 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, March 21, 2017 – Overweight and obese young men are at increased risk for serious liver disease or liver cancer later in life, and those with diabetes have an even higher risk, a new study warns. Efforts to reduce obesity, "should be implemented from an early age to reduce the future burden of severe liver disease on individuals and society," say Swedish researchers led by Hannes Hagstrom, of the Center for Digestive Diseases at Karolinska University Hospital in Stockholm. A liver specialist in the United States agreed. "This should be a wake-up call for young men to take their weight seriously and take steps to stay in shape to hopefully prevent liver disease, diabetes and liver cancer in the future," said Dr. David Bernstein, chief of hepatology at Northwell Health in Manhasset, NY. He explained that obesity is linked to the development of a condition called non-alcoholic ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Cirrhosis, Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease, Liver Cirrhosis, Liver and Pancreatic Disease, Benign Liver Tumor, Hepatic Tumor

Cancer Isn't 'One Size Fits All' for Hispanics

Posted 21 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Feb. 21, 2017 – Cancer death rates can vary widely between different Hispanic ethnic groups in the United States, a new study finds. "Hispanic populations are all different, reflecting their country of origin, cultural experiences and socioeconomic status," said study author Dr. Paulo Pinheiro, an associate professor of epidemiology at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. "If we can detect the differences among them, we can more easily identify public health strategies that could decrease their cancer risk and improve health outcomes," he explained. In the study, Pinheiro's team analyzed 2008-2012 health data from Florida. The researchers said this is the only state with statistically significant representation from all major Hispanic ethnic groups: Cuban, Puerto Rican, Mexican, Central American, Dominican and South American. While cancer is the leading cause of death among ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Hepatitis C, Prostate Cancer, Hepatocellular Carcinoma, Hepatic Tumor

More Evidence Linking Obesity to Liver Cancer

Posted 14 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Oct. 14, 2016 – Having a large waistline, a high body mass index (BMI) and type 2 diabetes, may raise your risk for liver cancer, a new study suggests. "We found that each of these three factors was associated, robustly, with liver cancer risk," said study co-author Peter Campbell. He's strategic director of digestive system cancer research at the American Cancer Society. Liver cancer rates have roughly tripled in the United States since the mid-1970s, "and the prognosis for patients diagnosed with this type of cancer is especially grim," Campbell said. He and his colleagues examined data on 1.57 million adults from 14 U.S. studies to look for an association between obesity and type 2 diabetes and liver cancer. None of the participants had cancer when the study began. Over time, 6.5 percent of the participants were diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, which is an obesity-related ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Cancer, Hepatocellular Carcinoma, Liver and Pancreatic Disease, Hepatic Tumor

Generic Hepatitis C Drugs as Effective as Pricey Brand Names: Study

Posted 18 Apr 2016 by Drugs.com

SATURDAY, April 16, 2016 – Low-cost generic antiviral drugs are as effective and safe as more expensive brand-name drugs in treating people with hepatitis C, researchers report. In many countries, people don't have access to a course of brand-name direct-acting antiviral drugs due to the high cost – as much as $94,000 a patient, the researchers explained. However, mass-produced generic versions are available for less than 1 percent of the retail price of the brand-name drugs, they added. "Our interim data suggests a potential solution for hepatitis C patients in areas where treatment access has been restricted as a result of the high prices demanded for branded treatment," said study author Dr. James Freeman, of GP2U Telehealth in Hobart, Australia. The study of patients in the United States, Canada, Africa, Australia, Europe and Southeast Asia found that generic direct-acting ... Read more

Related support groups: Hepatitis C, Harvoni, Sovaldi, Ribavirin, Sofosbuvir, Daklinza, Liver and Pancreatic Disease, Ribasphere, Copegus, Rebetol, Ledipasvir/sofosbuvir, Interferon Alfa-2B/Ribavirin, RibaPak, Daclatasvir, Rebetron, Virazole, Hepatic Tumor, RibaTab, Moderiba

Ridding U.S. of Hepatitis B, C as 'Public Health Problem' Possible: Experts

Posted 11 Apr 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, April 11, 2016 – Experts say there's real hope in someday ridding the United States of the "public health problem" of hepatitis B and C infection. The two viral strains cause serious, often fatal, liver disease for tens of thousands of Americans each year. The comprehensive new report is from a panel of experts at the U.S. National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. They believe that the advent of a powerful new vaccine and medicines could help drastically lower hepatitis B and C rates across the country. Still, to reach that goal will take time and considerable resources, the report said. "Ending illness and deaths from hepatitis C depends on both stopping the disease's progression in its early stages and reversing the course of advanced disease," the committee said in a news release. According to the report, between 700,000 and 1.4 million Americans have ... Read more

Related support groups: Hepatitis C, Cirrhosis, Hepatitis B, Liver Cirrhosis, Exposure to Hepatitis B Virus, Hepatic Tumor

Gene Variant May Explain Higher Rates of Some Cancers in Black People

Posted 31 Mar 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, March 31, 2016 – A single gene variant may explain why black Americans with common cancers have shorter survival times and higher death rates than other races, a new study suggests. While some researchers have examined possible socioeconomic factors to explain these differences, others have focused on genetics. "We may finally have a truly genetic explanation for why African-Americans are more prone to a variety of cancers," said study senior author Maureen Murphy. She is a professor and program leader in the Molecular and Cellular Oncogenesis program at the Wistar Institute in Philadelphia. "This is a variant that has never been observed in Caucasian populations, so identifying people who have this variant may be crucial for providing improved prognosis and personalized treatment that will lead to better outcomes," she said in an institute news release. In this study, ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Hepatocellular Carcinoma, Liver and Pancreatic Disease, Hepatic Tumor

Screening Inmates for Hepatitis C Benefits General Community: Study

Posted 23 Nov 2015 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Nov. 23, 2015 – A prison-based hepatitis C screening and treatment program could benefit the broader community, researchers suggest. Besides reducing the spread of hepatitis C after prisoners are released, "universal [hepatitis C] testing and treatment in prisons would reduce outcomes of advanced [hepatitis C] such as liver cancer, end-stage liver disease and death among prisoners," said study senior author Jagpreet Chhatwal, of Massachusetts General Hospital's Institute for Technology Assessment in Boston. "We now have highly effective treatments for [hepatitis C], so we wanted to know the impact of providing routine testing and treatment to inmates, a group in which the infection is highly prevalent," Chhatwal said in a hospital news release. More than 1 percent of the U.S. population has hepatitis C, but the virus affects more than 17 percent of prisoners, the researchers ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Hepatitis C, Liver Cirrhosis, Hepatocellular Carcinoma, Liver and Pancreatic Disease, Benign Liver Tumor, Hepatic Coma, Liver Metastasis in Adenocarcinoma, Hepatic Tumor

Obesity May Speed Aging of the Liver, Study Suggests

Posted 14 Oct 2014 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Oct. 13, 2014 – Extra pounds cause the liver to age faster, potentially explaining why obesity is linked to diseases like liver cancer and insulin resistance, new research suggests. It's not clear if this aging directly translates to higher risks of certain diseases. Still, it's possible that "people whose liver is much older than expected need to be screened more carefully for various diseases even if they managed to lose a lot of weight," said study author Steve Horvath, a professor of human genetics and biostatistics at the University of California, Los Angeles School of Public Health. Epigenetic aging is the aging rates of various tissues in the body. "According to the epigenetic aging clock, the vast majority of tissues, cell types and organs age at the same rate," Horvath said. But these aging rates may differ from person to person. "Some people are clearly older than ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Insulin Resistance, Hepatic Tumor

Liver Cancer Drug Fails to Live Up to Early Promise

Posted 1 Jul 2014 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, July 1, 2014 – Although it looked promising in early studies, the drug everolimus didn't improve survival for people with advanced liver cancer in its latest trial, a new study found. The findings from the phase 3 clinical trial are disappointing because earlier research suggested that everolimus (Afinitor) prevented tumor progression and improved survival for in advanced liver cancer. Normally, these patients can expect a median overall survival of less than one year. The only drug currently shown to significantly improve survival of advanced liver cancer patients is sorafenib (Nexavar). But that drug's benefits are temporary and the cancer eventually progresses, according to background information in the new study. The current study included 546 adults with advanced liver cancer whose disease progressed during or after treatment with sorafenib, or who could not take ... Read more

Related support groups: Afinitor, Nexavar, Sorafenib, Everolimus, Zortress, Hepatic Tumor

Screening May Help Boost Liver Cancer Survival Rates

Posted 7 May 2014 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, May 7, 2014 – Increased screening for liver tumors in people with cirrhosis – scarring of the liver – could help boost liver cancer survival rates, according to researchers. A review of 47 studies that included more than 15,000 patients found the survival rate for those screened with ultrasound scans and blood tests was 51 percent, compared with a 28 percent rate for those who were not screened. The research team, from the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, also found that cirrhosis patients who were screened were more likely to receive treatment for their cancer rather than end-of-life care. "Curative therapies, such as surgery or a liver transplant, are only available if patients are found to have liver cancer at an early stage. Unfortunately, right now, only a minority of patients' cancers are found at an early stage," study author Dr. Amit Singal, medical ... Read more

Related support groups: Hepatic Tumor

Study Links Coffee to Lower Liver Cancer Risk

Posted 9 Apr 2014 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, April 9, 2014 – Researchers say they've discovered yet another reason to love coffee: A new study suggests that people who drink at least a cup a day have a lower risk of liver cancer compared to those who only indulge occasionally. The study was to be presented Wednesday at the annual meeting of the American Association of Cancer Researchers in San Diego. Research presented at meetings should be viewed as preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed medical journal. When the study started in the 1990s, researchers asked nearly 180,000 adults of different racial and ethnic backgrounds about their coffee drinking and other lifestyle habits. Study participants have now been tracked for as long as 18 years, and researchers have kept tabs on how many have developed hepatocellular carcinoma, the most common kind of liver cancer. So far, 498 study participants have been ... Read more

Related support groups: Caffeine, Alert, NoDoz, Valentine, Overtime, Vivarin, Stay Alert, No Doz, Hepatic Tumor, Verv, Lucidex, Fastlene, Wakespan, Pep-Back Peak Performance, Cafcit, Enerjets, Keep Alert, NoDoz Maximum Strength, Molie, Stat Awake

Aspirin May Reduce Risk of Liver Cancer, Death From Liver Disease

Posted 28 Nov 2012 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 28 – Aspirin use seems to be associated with a decreased risk of liver cancer and death from chronic liver disease, according to a large new study. This new study included more than 300,000 people aged 50 to 71, who reported their aspirin and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) use and were followed for 10 to 12 years. During that time, more than 400 participants died from chronic liver disease and 250 were diagnosed with liver cancer. Compared to people who didn't take NSAIDs, people who took aspirin were 45 percent less likely to die from chronic liver disease and 41 percent less likely to be diagnosed with liver cancer. People who took non-aspirin NSAIDs were 26 percent less likely to die from chronic liver disease but no less likely to be diagnosed with liver cancer. If these findings are confirmed, they could lead to new ways to prevent chronic liver ... Read more

Related support groups: Aspirin, Ecotrin, Bayer Aspirin, Hepatocellular Carcinoma, Bufferin, Buffered Aspirin, Low Dose ASA, Aspergum, Fasprin, Hepatic Tumor, Aspir-Low, St Joseph Aspirin, Aspirin Low Strength, ZORprin, Sloprin, Easprin, Bayer Childrens Aspirin, Gennin-FC, Ecotrin Maximum Strength, Buffasal

Childhood Obesity May Raise Odds of Adult Liver Cancer

Posted 20 Apr 2012 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, April 20 – Adults who were obese as children are at increased risk for liver cancer, a new study suggests. Researchers looked at the birth weight and body-mass index (a measurement of body fat based on height and weight commonly called BMI) of more than 165,000 men and 160,000 women in Denmark born between 1930 and 1989. Of those participants, 252 developed hepatocellular carcinoma, the most common form of liver cancer in adulthood. The study authors calculated that at age 7, the risk of developing hepatocellular carcinoma increased by 12 percent for every one-point increase in BMI. By age 13, that risk increased to 25 percent. Therefore, as units of BMI increased into adulthood, so did the risk of developing hepatocellular carcinoma. This was consistently similar across both genders and all ages. Other factors associated with liver cancer include alcoholism, infection by ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Hepatocellular Carcinoma, Hepatic Tumor

Researchers Identify Liver Cancer Risk Factors

Posted 7 Jan 2012 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Jan. 6 – Two new studies from the Mayo Clinic find that hepatitis C infection and obesity could be to blame for a surge in liver cancer cases, which have tripled over the last 30 years. Late-stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), or liver cancer, has only a 10 percent to 12 percent five-year survival rate, according to figures in a Mayo news release. The researchers say their findings could help doctors diagnose the disease earlier and save lives. Both studies appear in the January issue of Mayo Clinic Proceedings "The studies illuminate the importance of identifying people with risk factors in certain populations to help catch the disease in its early, treatable stages," said Dr. W. Ray Kim, a gastroenterology and hepatology specialist and principal investigator of one study, in the release. The researchers examined several decades of medical information from the Rochester ... Read more

Related support groups: Hepatocellular Carcinoma, Hepatic Tumor

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Related Condition Support Groups

Hepatocellular Carcinoma, Liver and Pancreatic Disease

Related Drug Support Groups

Nexavar, sorafenib