Skip to Content

Join the 'Hemodialysis Anticoagulation' group to help and get support from people like you.

Hemodialysis Anticoagulation News

Coming Soon: A Wearable Artificial Kidney?

Posted 7 Jun 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, June 7, 2016 - Someday, dialysis patients might free themselves of clunky machines, moving about with a "wearable artificial kidney" instead. That's the promise of a new clinical trial that suggests this type of technology is finally within reach. "This would be a game changer," said one kidney specialist, Dr. Maria DeVita. "The fact that clinical trials are beginning gives us all hope that we will have a significant improvement in the care of those patients requiring ongoing hemodialysis." DeVita is associate director of nephrology at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City. People with advanced kidney disease must often resort to spending hours a day at dialysis centers, with special machines cleansing their blood as their kidneys once did. The dream has long been a small portable device that could perform dialysis as patients went about their usual day. That dream may be ... Read more

Related support groups: Renal Failure, Chronic Kidney Disease, Diabetic Kidney Disease, Nephrotic Syndrome, Hemodialysis, Peritoneal dialysis, Diabetic Nephropathy, Anemia Associated with Chronic Renal Failure, Polycystic Kidney Disease, Diagnosis and Investigation, Renal Osteodystrophy, Alport Syndrome, Hyperphosphatemia of Renal Failure, Anuria, Hypertensive Renal Disease, Hemodialysis Anticoagulation, Renal and Genitourinary Disorders

Do Taller Patients Fare Worse on Dialysis?

Posted 1 Oct 2015 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Oct. 1, 2015 – Tallness may be linked with an increased risk for premature death in kidney failure patients on dialysis, a new study suggests. While the researchers only found an association and not a cause-and-effect link, tall people on dialysis appeared to have higher rates of premature death than people in the general population. The risk was higher in men than in women, and among patients with shorter dialysis treatment times, the researchers said. The researchers analyzed data from just over 1 million Americans who began dialysis between 1995 and 2008 and were followed for up to five years. Being tall was associated with increased risk of premature death among dialysis patients who were American Indian/Alaska natives, Asians and whites, but this was not the case among black patients in the study. Tall black dialysis patients' risk of premature death was the same as in ... Read more

Related support groups: Renal Failure, Chronic Kidney Disease, Diabetic Kidney Disease, Hemodialysis, Diabetic Nephropathy, Anemia Associated with Chronic Renal Failure, Hemodialysis Anticoagulation, Renal and Genitourinary Disorders, Anuria

Blood Pressure Drop During Dialysis May Raise Clot Risk

Posted 29 Jul 2011 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, July 29 – Low blood pressure while undergoing dialysis puts patients at increased risk for clots where their blood vessels are connected to the dialysis machine, a new study says. Previous research had found that a sudden drop in blood pressure during dialysis can lead to short-term gastrointestinal, muscular and neurologic symptoms, and long-term problems such as stroke, seizure, heart damage and death. This new study, led by researchers at Stanford University School of Medicine, examined data collected between 1995 and 2000 from 1,426 dialysis patients who took part in a clinical trial sponsored by the U.S. National Institutes of Health. Dialysis is a treatment for kidney-failure patients that uses a machine to cleanse their blood. Many patients are attached to the dialysis machine through a fistula, a surgically created vascular access point in the body that's connected to ... Read more

Related support groups: Hemodialysis, Peritoneal dialysis, Hemodialysis Anticoagulation

Many Dialysis Patients Get Wrong Blood Thinners for Angioplasty

Posted 9 Dec 2009 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Dec. 8 – More than one-fifth of patients on dialysis who undergo angioplasty are given blood thinners they should not be given, new research shows. As a result, these patients are subject to a higher rate of bleeding during their hospital stay and may even be at a higher risk of dying, according to a report in the Dec. 9 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association. The drugs in question are enoxaparin (Lovenox), a low-molecular-weight heparin, and eptifibatide (Integrilin). The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has determined that neither medication should be used in people undergoing dialysis. "The study does validate the FDA's directed labeling [of these drugs] as contraindicated, and it supports avoiding use of these drugs in dialysis patients," said study author Dr. Thomas Tsai, director of interventional cardiology at the Denver VA Medical Center and an ... Read more

Related support groups: Lovenox, Enoxaparin, Clexane, Hemodialysis Anticoagulation, Eptifibatide, Integrilin, Lovenox HP, Clexane Forte

Ask a Question

Further Information

Related Condition Support Groups

Hemodialysis