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Head & Neck Surgery News

Tonsillectomy May Carry More Risks in Kids Age 3 and Under

Posted 9 days ago by

THURSDAY, March 15, 2018 – When a child's tonsils become inflamed, surgical removal – a tonsillectomy – is often ordered. But new research suggests more caution may be needed in patients aged 3 or younger. The study of more than 1,800 cases involving children under the age of 6 found that the rate of complications – events such as bleeding or respiratory issues – rose for the youngest ...

Kids Still Getting Risky Painkiller Codeine After Tonsillectomy

Posted 16 Nov 2017 by

THURSDAY, Nov. 16, 2017 – Despite safety warnings from drug regulators, some U.S. children are still being given a risky painkiller after having their tonsils removed, a new study finds. At issue is the opioid painkiller codeine. In 2013, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration issued a "black box" warning, advising doctors against prescribing codeine to children to control tonsillectomy pain. ...

Doctors Prescribing Too Many Opioids After Nose Jobs

Posted 9 Nov 2017 by

THURSDAY, Nov. 9, 2017 – Could some patients recovering from a nose job get a problem they didn't bargain for? After these operations, patients are often sent home with more opioid pain pills than they need, increasing the risk for misuse, researchers say. About 218,000 cosmetic nose surgeries were performed in the United States in 2015. In fact, "rhinoplasty" is one of the most common plastic ...

People Deemed Better Looking, Better Off After a Nose Job

Posted 19 Oct 2017 by

THURSDAY, Oct. 19, 2017 – Is a "nose job" worth it? And if so, how much? A new study suggests that casual observers may think patients who undergo such procedures are more attractive, more successful and healthier. "While we are not suggesting that [a nose job] is the only way to improve one's appearance, improving our attractiveness and health as compared to others conveys a competitive ...

Common Post-Op Ear Drops Tied to Eardrum Perforations in Kids

Posted 30 Mar 2017 by

THURSDAY, March 30, 2017 – Children who suffer through multiple ear infections are often candidates for ear tube surgery. But a new study finds that the use of one type of ear drops – quinolones – after these surgeries may raise a child's risk for a perforated eardrum. Children who received post-surgical quinolones were 60 percent more likely to suffer eardrum perforations than those who ...

U.S. Doctors Trained Overseas Have Slightly Better Patient Outcomes

Posted 6 Feb 2017 by

FRIDAY, Feb. 3, 2017 – Death rates are lower for older Americans treated by doctors trained in other countries than by those who went to a U.S. medical school, a new study reports. That finding held true even though foreign-trained doctors are more likely to care for patients with more chronic health problems. The results of this study should dispel Americans' concerns about the quality of care ...

Plastic Surgeons Often Miss Patients' Mental Disorders

Posted 18 Jan 2017 by

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 18, 2016 – Nearly one in 10 patients seeking facial plastic surgery suffers from a mental illness that distorts their perception of physical defects, but doctors often don't spot the problem, new research suggests. Researchers found that plastic surgeons correctly identified the diagnosis of body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) in less than 5 percent of patients who screened positive ...

Should More Kids Have Their Tonsils Out?

Posted 17 Jan 2017 by

TUESDAY, Jan. 17, 2017 – Because of stringent tonsillectomy guidelines, some kids who could benefit from tonsil removal surgery aren't getting it, two new reviews suggest. To qualify for the surgery, a child must have many recurring throat infections within a short span of time or severe sleep disturbances, said Dr. Sivakumar Chinnadurai, a co-author of the reviews. An evaluation of current ...

Surgery Not the Answer for Most Back Pain, Sports Doctor Says

Posted 3 Nov 2016 by

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 2, 2016 – Back pain is a common problem, but most cases can be treated without surgery, a sports medicine specialist says. Sometime during their lives, up to 80 percent of people will have back pain that lasts more than three days. The first step in treating back pain is understanding it, according to Dr. Gregory Billy, a physical medicine and rehabilitation specialist with Penn ...

Babies With Cleft Lip Likely to Have Normal Adulthood: Study

Posted 27 Sep 2016 by

TUESDAY, Sept. 27, 2016 – Cleft lip is a relatively common birth defect that can be surgically repaired, and new research suggests that parents don't have to worry about long-term health problems for these children. But the same may not hold true for cleft palate, the Norwegian researchers said. A cleft lip occurs if the tissue that makes up the lip doesn't join completely before birth, leading ...

Removing Part of Skull After Severe Head Injury Brings Mixed Results

Posted 8 Sep 2016 by

THURSDAY, Sept. 8, 2016 – Removing part of the skull to relieve pressure in the brain following a severe head injury can save a person's life, but the patient is often left permanently disabled, a new clinical trial has determined. Doctors frequently turn to craniectomy for patients who are suffering from brain swelling as a result of traumatic head injury, but little is known about whether the ...

Surgery Effective Against Immune Disorder That Weakens Muscles

Posted 11 Aug 2016 by

THURSDAY, Aug. 11, 2016 – Removing the thymus gland is an effective treatment for myasthenia gravis, an autoimmune disorder that causes life-threatening muscle weakness, researchers report. Since the 1940s, doctors have been surgically removing the thymus gland – a procedure called thymectomy – as a means of treating myasthenia gravis. But this has been done based on research indicating the ...

Researchers Find 8 Immune Genes in Aggressive Brain Cancer

Posted 25 May 2016 by

WEDNESDAY, May 25, 2016 – Researchers have identified immune genes that may affect how long people live after diagnosis with a common type of brain cancer. If confirmed in other studies, the researchers say their findings could lead to improved treatment in the future. The type of brain cancer in the study is glioblastoma multiforme, a fast-growing tumor. People with this type of cancer survive ...

Doctors May Be Ordering Too Many Neck Artery Scans: Study

Posted 18 Apr 2016 by

MONDAY, April 18, 2016 – A new study suggests that many heart patients are scanned for potential blockages in their carotid arteries for uncertain or inappropriate reasons. The carotid arteries, which run up both sides of the neck, deliver blood to the brain. If they become blocked, that can cause a stroke. Once spotted, a blockage can be treated with surgery or medication, the researchers said. ...

Doctors Report on Success of Throat Reconstruction

Posted 9 Apr 2016 by

FRIDAY, April 8, 2016 – An American man who underwent throat reconstruction seven years ago has no swallowing problems and can eat normal food, researchers report. The man's severely damaged esophagus was reconstructed using commercially available metal stents and donated skin tissue. The stents – approved in the United States to help esophageal cancer patients with a throat obstruction to ...

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