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Head & Neck Surgery News

Kids Still Getting Risky Painkiller Codeine After Tonsillectomy

Posted 16 Nov 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Nov. 16, 2017 – Despite safety warnings from drug regulators, some U.S. children are still being given a risky painkiller after having their tonsils removed, a new study finds. At issue is the opioid painkiller codeine. In 2013, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration issued a "black box" warning, advising doctors against prescribing codeine to children to control tonsillectomy pain. That came after an investigation into reports of children overdosing on codeine prescriptions – including some who died from respiratory distress. The new study, published online Nov. 15 in Pediatrics, looked at how well U.S. doctors are following the FDA warning. The good news, the researchers said, is that post-tonsillectomy codeine prescriptions have declined. However, by December 2015 – almost three years after the black box warning was issued – 5 percent of kids were still getting the drug. ... Read more

Related support groups: Codeine, Tonsillitis/Pharyngitis, Tylenol with Codeine, Cheratussin AC, Tylenol with Codeine 3, Statuss, Fiorinal with Codeine, Fioricet with Codeine, Head & Neck Surgery, Acetaminophen/Codeine, Codeine/Guaifenesin, Robitussin-AC, Tylenol with Codeine 4, Codeine/Promethazine, Iophen, Fiorinal with Codeine III, Iophen-C NR, Acetaminophen/Butalbital/Caffeine/Codeine, Promethazine VC with Codeine, Codeine/Phenylephrine/Promethazine

Doctors Prescribing Too Many Opioids After Nose Jobs

Posted 9 Nov 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Nov. 9, 2017 – Could some patients recovering from a nose job get a problem they didn't bargain for? After these operations, patients are often sent home with more opioid pain pills than they need, increasing the risk for misuse, researchers say. About 218,000 cosmetic nose surgeries were performed in the United States in 2015. In fact, "rhinoplasty" is one of the most common plastic surgery procedures in the United States, which is experiencing an opioid epidemic. The new study included 62 patients at two private practices and an academic health center who underwent rhinoplasty. The patients were prescribed the opioid painkiller Vicodin (hydrocodone/acetaminophen) for pain relief after surgery. On average, patients used nine of the 20 to 30 tablets they were prescribed. Seventy-four percent used 15 or fewer tablets, and only three patients needed refills. The number of ... Read more

Related support groups: Suboxone, Oxycodone, Surgery, Tramadol, Hydrocodone, Methadone, Percocet, OxyContin, Vicodin, Norco, Fentanyl, Morphine, Codeine, Lortab, Opana, Subutex, Dilaudid, Opana ER, MS Contin, Roxicodone

People Deemed Better Looking, Better Off After a Nose Job

Posted 19 Oct 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Oct. 19, 2017 – Is a "nose job" worth it? And if so, how much? A new study suggests that casual observers may think patients who undergo such procedures are more attractive, more successful and healthier. "While we are not suggesting that [a nose job] is the only way to improve one's appearance, improving our attractiveness and health as compared to others conveys a competitive advantage," said study co-author and plastic surgeon Dr. Lisa Ishii. More than 220,000 "nose reshaping" procedures – known as rhinoplasty – were performed in the United States in 2016, up 2 percent from the previous year, according to the American Society of Plastic Surgeons. The procedures are nearly as common as liposuction. The new study examines how "casual observers" perceive people after they've had a nose job, said Ishii, a plastic surgeon and associate professor at Johns Hopkins School of ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Nasal Congestion, Facial Wrinkles, Head & Neck Surgery

Common Post-Op Ear Drops Tied to Eardrum Perforations in Kids

Posted 30 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, March 30, 2017 – Children who suffer through multiple ear infections are often candidates for ear tube surgery. But a new study finds that the use of one type of ear drops – quinolones – after these surgeries may raise a child's risk for a perforated eardrum. Children who received post-surgical quinolones were 60 percent more likely to suffer eardrum perforations than those who received another type of ear drops, called neomycin, according to researchers from the University of Florida in Gainesville. The surgery in question is called tympanostomy. In these surgeries, small tubes are inserted into the eardrums to open up the area behind the eardrum and keep air pressure at a level equal to that of the middle ear. This helps prevent fluid buildup in the middle ear. "We have tended to use quinolone ear drops fairly liberally after tympanostomy tube surgery," study co-author ... Read more

Related support groups: Cipro, Ciprofloxacin, Otitis Media, Levaquin, Levofloxacin, Avelox, Neomycin, Neosporin, Ofloxacin, Triple Antibiotic, Head & Neck Surgery, Moxifloxacin, Maxitrol, Cortisporin Otic, Norfloxacin, Gemifloxacin, Gatifloxacin, Neomycin/Polymyxin B, Floxin, Lomefloxacin

U.S. Doctors Trained Overseas Have Slightly Better Patient Outcomes

Posted 6 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Feb. 3, 2017 – Death rates are lower for older Americans treated by doctors trained in other countries than by those who went to a U.S. medical school, a new study reports. That finding held true even though foreign-trained doctors are more likely to care for patients with more chronic health problems. The results of this study should dispel Americans' concerns about the quality of care provided by doctors trained in other countries, the researchers said. The study included information from more than 1.2 million Medicare patients aged 65 and older. All had been admitted to the hospital between 2011 and 2014. The 30-day death rate was 11.2 percent for patients treated by foreign-trained doctors and 11.6 percent for those treated by U.S.-trained doctors, the investigators found. There was no difference in patient hospital readmission rates. But the cost of care was slightly ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Hip Replacement, Orthopedic Surgery, Head & Neck Surgery, Vascular Surgery, Cardiothoracic Surgery

Plastic Surgeons Often Miss Patients' Mental Disorders

Posted 18 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 18, 2016 – Nearly one in 10 patients seeking facial plastic surgery suffers from a mental illness that distorts their perception of physical defects, but doctors often don't spot the problem, new research suggests. Researchers found that plastic surgeons correctly identified the diagnosis of body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) in less than 5 percent of patients who screened positive for the disorder. According to published reports, many specialists suspect that the late superstar Michael Jackson – who underwent repeated plastic surgeries that dramatically changed his appearance – struggled with body dysmorphic disorder. Those affected with BDD, considered a type of obsessive-compulsive disorder, are overly preoccupied with perceived body defects that are actually miniscule and commonly involve the nose, eyes, skin or hair, the study authors said. "We all knew patients with ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Psychiatric Disorders, Facial Wrinkles, Body Dysmorphic Disorder, Head & Neck Surgery, Facial Lipoatrophy, Lip Augmentation, Orbicularis Oculi

Should More Kids Have Their Tonsils Out?

Posted 17 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Jan. 17, 2017 – Because of stringent tonsillectomy guidelines, some kids who could benefit from tonsil removal surgery aren't getting it, two new reviews suggest. To qualify for the surgery, a child must have many recurring throat infections within a short span of time or severe sleep disturbances, said Dr. Sivakumar Chinnadurai, a co-author of the reviews. An evaluation of current medical evidence suggests more kids would receive significant short-term improvement in their daily life if the guidelines were relaxed, said Chinnadurai, a pediatric otolaryngologist with Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville. Children experienced nearly half as many sore throats when they underwent a tonsillectomy, even if they didn't meet the guidelines, Chinnadurai and his colleagues found. The kids also missed fewer days of school and were less likely to need medical care. However, ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Sore Throat, Sleep Apnea, Head & Neck Surgery, Obstructive Sleep Apnea/Hypopnea Syndrome, Surgical Prophylaxis

Surgery Not the Answer for Most Back Pain, Sports Doctor Says

Posted 3 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 2, 2016 – Back pain is a common problem, but most cases can be treated without surgery, a sports medicine specialist says. Sometime during their lives, up to 80 percent of people will have back pain that lasts more than three days. The first step in treating back pain is understanding it, according to Dr. Gregory Billy, a physical medicine and rehabilitation specialist with Penn State Sports Medicine. "A physician should ask about the history of your pain, including its exact location, what makes it feel better or worse and what may have caused it," Billy said in a university news release. "A physical exam helps isolate the cause of the pain – for example, what happens when you stand, sit, lift your leg or walk?" While an MRI can help with a diagnosis, it has limitations. "Because the back changes with age, MRIs of many older adults are likely to depict damage, but the ... Read more

Related support groups: Pain, Surgery, Back Pain, Chronic Pain, Orthopedic Surgery, Head & Neck Surgery

Babies With Cleft Lip Likely to Have Normal Adulthood: Study

Posted 27 Sep 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Sept. 27, 2016 – Cleft lip is a relatively common birth defect that can be surgically repaired, and new research suggests that parents don't have to worry about long-term health problems for these children. But the same may not hold true for cleft palate, the Norwegian researchers said. A cleft lip occurs if the tissue that makes up the lip doesn't join completely before birth, leading to an opening in the upper lip. A cleft palate occurs when the tissue at the roof of the mouth doesn't fuse completely during pregnancy. The researchers found that babies born with cleft lip, with or without cleft palate, had no greater risk for health problems and death than those born without clefts. But they found that infants born with cleft palate alone had a slightly increased risk of dying early and of having conditions such as intellectual disability, autism and severe learning ... Read more

Related support groups: Oral and Dental Conditions, Autism, Delivery, Head & Neck Surgery, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Removing Part of Skull After Severe Head Injury Brings Mixed Results

Posted 8 Sep 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Sept. 8, 2016 – Removing part of the skull to relieve pressure in the brain following a severe head injury can save a person's life, but the patient is often left permanently disabled, a new clinical trial has determined. Doctors frequently turn to craniectomy for patients who are suffering from brain swelling as a result of traumatic head injury, but little is known about whether the procedure spares these patients from long-term brain damage. The new trial found it can drastically reduce risk of death, with about 30 percent of patients dying following the procedure compared to 52 percent of those treated with standard medical care. However, people treated with a craniectomy were three times more likely to wind up in a vegetative state (6 percent vs. 2 percent), and often were as likely to suffer long-term disabilities as patients receiving standard medical care, the study ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Head Injury, Head & Neck Surgery, Neurosurgery, Head Injury with Intracranial Hemorrhage, Head Injury w/ Intracranial Hemorrhage and Loss of Consciousness, Head Injury with Loss of Consciousness, Seizure Prophylaxis During or Following Neurosurgery

Surgery Effective Against Immune Disorder That Weakens Muscles

Posted 11 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Aug. 11, 2016 – Removing the thymus gland is an effective treatment for myasthenia gravis, an autoimmune disorder that causes life-threatening muscle weakness, researchers report. Since the 1940s, doctors have been surgically removing the thymus gland – a procedure called thymectomy – as a means of treating myasthenia gravis. But this has been done based on research indicating the gland might play a role in the development of the disease. "It has never been clearly shown to benefit patients beyond other medical therapies that have developed over time," said lead researcher Dr. Gil Wolfe. He's the chair of neurology for the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences at the University at Buffalo in New York. "There has always been a question of how much favorable impact it actually provides," Wolfe said. Now, Wolfe and his colleagues have proven that thymectomy offers ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Myasthenia Gravis, Head & Neck Surgery

Researchers Find 8 Immune Genes in Aggressive Brain Cancer

Posted 25 May 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, May 25, 2016 – Researchers have identified immune genes that may affect how long people live after diagnosis with a common type of brain cancer. If confirmed in other studies, the researchers say their findings could lead to improved treatment in the future. The type of brain cancer in the study is glioblastoma multiforme, a fast-growing tumor. People with this type of cancer survive an average of less than two years, even after treatment with surgery, radiation and chemotherapy, the study authors said. "We've had luck with other types of cancer in removing the brakes on the immune system to allow it to fight the tumors, but this has not been the case with glioblastoma," said study author Dr. Anhua Wu, of First Hospital of China Medical University in Shenyang, China. "If our discovery of these genes is validated in other studies, we could use this 'gene signature' to ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Brain Tumor, Nausea/Vomiting - Chemotherapy Induced, Head & Neck Surgery, Glioblastoma Multiforme, Diagnosis and Investigation, Malignant Glioma, Head Imaging

Doctors May Be Ordering Too Many Neck Artery Scans: Study

Posted 18 Apr 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, April 18, 2016 – A new study suggests that many heart patients are scanned for potential blockages in their carotid arteries for uncertain or inappropriate reasons. The carotid arteries, which run up both sides of the neck, deliver blood to the brain. If they become blocked, that can cause a stroke. Once spotted, a blockage can be treated with surgery or medication, the researchers said. But among more than 4,000 VA patients in the study, scans for uncertain reasons happened more than 83 percent of the time, while scans for inappropriate reasons happened 11 percent of the time. Only slightly over 5 percent of these patients were screened for appropriate reasons, the study found. "The vast majority were done for uncertain or inappropriate reasons," said Dr. Larry Goldstein, chairman of the department of neurology at the University of Kentucky School of Medicine. He wrote a ... Read more

Related support groups: Coronary Artery Disease (CAD), Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Head & Neck Surgery, Acute Coronary Syndrome, Diagnosis and Investigation, Body Imaging, Head Imaging

Doctors Report on Success of Throat Reconstruction

Posted 9 Apr 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, April 8, 2016 – An American man who underwent throat reconstruction seven years ago has no swallowing problems and can eat normal food, researchers report. The man's severely damaged esophagus was reconstructed using commercially available metal stents and donated skin tissue. The stents – approved in the United States to help esophageal cancer patients with a throat obstruction to swallow – provided a scaffold for the tissue to grow on. "This is a first in human operation and one that we undertook as a lifesaving measure once we had exhausted all other options available to us and the patient," said study author Dr. Kulwinder Dua. He is a professor in the division of gastroenterology and hepatology at the Medical College of Wisconsin, in Milwaukee. The stents were removed four years ago, according to the study published April 8 in The Lancet. "The approach we used is novel ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Head & Neck Surgery

Surgeons' Experience Matters With Thyroid Removal

Posted 28 Mar 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, March 25, 2016 – If you need your thyroid gland removed, choosing a surgeon who performs more than 25 thyroid removals a year might minimize your risks, a new study suggests. "This is a very technical operation, and patients should feel empowered to ask their surgeons how many procedures they do each year, on average," said study senior author Dr. Julie Sosa, chief of endocrine surgery at Duke University, in Durham, N.C. "Surgeons have an ethical responsibility to report their case numbers. While this is not a guarantee of a positive outcome, choosing a more experienced surgeon certainly can improve the odds that the patient will do well," Sosa said in a university news release. The thyroid, located at the base of the throat, produces hormones that regulate your metabolism. Thyroid removal (thyroidectomy) is not uncommon and often done due to cancer or enlargement, Sosa and her ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Thyroid Disease, Thyroid Cancer, Head & Neck Surgery, Thyroid Storm, Myxedema Coma, Thyroid Tumor

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