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Head Injury with Loss of Consciousness News

Helmets Too Rarely Used in Baseball and Softball

Posted 31 Oct 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Oct. 31, 2017 – Despite a significant risk of head injuries in baseball and softball, helmet use in those sports is low, a new review says. "Our review demonstrates that traumatic brain injury in baseball and softball affects players of all levels and all positions," said study lead author Dr. Michael Cusimano, a neurosurgeon at St. Michael's Hospital in Toronto. "Although the risk for traumatic brain injury is lower in baseball than other, high-contact sports like hockey and football, because the injuries can lead to very serious injuries like skull fractures and bleeding in the brain caused by balls or bats, it should be considered equally as serious and addressed in a way that reflects that," he said in a hospital news release. Cusimano and his colleagues reviewed 29 studies that included nearly 243,000 traumatic brain injuries sustained by baseball and softball players ... Read more

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Hockey Study Suggests Injured Kids Sent Back on the Ice Too Soon

Posted 25 Oct 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 25, 2017 – After-effects of a concussion continue to wrack the brains of young hockey players long after they appear ready to return to play, new research finds. MRI scans of concussed teen hockey players revealed brain changes persist for at least three months – weeks after other symptoms resolve and skaters are cleared to hit the ice, a Canadian research team found. Scores on thinking and memory tests – two current measures of recovery – returned to normal about 24 days (on average) following a concussion, the study findings showed. These results indicate that current clinical tests used to judge an athlete's recovery could be improved, said senior researcher Ravi Menon. He's a professor and chair of functional and molecular imaging with the University of Western Ontario's Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry. "Clearly those tests are not very sensitive," ... Read more

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State Laws Help Reduce Concussions in Youth Sports

Posted 25 Oct 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Oct. 19, 2017 – State laws aimed at curbing an alarming rise in concussions among student athletes appear to be working. Since 2014, all 50 states and the District of Columbia have passed laws to protect young athletes against traumatic brain injury (TBI). Washington state was the first in 2009. Most of the laws require athletes with suspected concussions to stop playing until a doctor clears them to return. Coaches, players and parents must also receive yearly education about concussion. "This movement to get these laws passed has made a huge difference," said Kenneth Podell, director of the Houston Methodist Concussion Center, who reviewed a new study assessing the laws. Led by Nationwide Children's Hospital in Columbus, Ohio, researchers examined concussion reports to a nationwide sports injury tracking program before and after the laws were passed. The data covered nine ... Read more

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Who's Most at Risk of Head Injury in Youth Football?

Posted 17 Oct 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Oct. 17, 2017 – Young football players are more likely to experience a brain-jarring hit to the head if they're part of a team's running and passing game or a fast-moving defender, a small study found. High-magnitude head impacts most often involve positions such as quarterback, running back and linebacker as those players sprint across an open field, Virginia Tech researchers concluded after watching a season of youth football in Blacksburg, Va. These players experienced nearly twice the number of severe head hits as linemen did, the study reported. "Players who are able to get up to speed prior to impact, players who are off the line of scrimmage, those players are more likely to experience a high-magnitude head impact," said lead researcher Eamon Campolettano. He is a graduate research assistant at the university's department of biomedical engineering and mechanics. ... Read more

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Girls' Sports-Related Concussions May Last Twice As Long

Posted 2 Oct 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Oct. 2, 2017 – Sports concussion symptoms linger twice as long in teen girls as in boys, a new study finds. "These findings confirm what many in sports medicine have believed for some time," said lead researcher Dr. John Neidecker, a sports concussion specialist in Raleigh, N.C. Previous research has suggested that concussions may exacerbate underlying conditions that are more prevalent in girls – migraine headaches, depression, anxiety and stress. This may explain the extended recovery period, Neidecker and his colleagues said. The study findings were published Oct. 2 in the Journal of the American Osteopathic Association. The results highlight "the need to take a whole person approach to managing concussions, looking beyond the injury to understand the mental and emotional impacts on recovery when symptoms persist," Neidecker said. Doctors should get a full patient history ... Read more

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20 Percent of U.S. Teens May Have Had a Concussion

Posted 26 Sep 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Sept. 26, 2017 – As many as one in five U.S. teens may have suffered a concussion, and contact sports might often be the cause. That's the conclusion of new research that included more than 13,000 teens. It also found that nearly 6 percent of teens reported having more than one concussion. These findings show that the number of middle school and high school students who will suffer a concussion in their lifetime is greater than thought, said lead researcher Phil Veliz. "The prevalence of concussions may be much higher than what is reported from emergency room data," said Veliz, a research assistant professor at the University of Michigan. "Participation in contact sports shows a strong association with reporting a diagnosed concussion," he added. These findings suggest a greater need for prevention efforts in schools and communities, "particularly with respect to ... Read more

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Girl Soccer Players Take More Chances After Concussions

Posted 19 Sep 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Sept. 19, 2017 – Girls who play soccer try to tough it out after a concussion more often than their male peers do, researchers warn. In fact, they were five times more likely than boys to return to the field on the same day, putting them at increased risk for injury, the small study found. The researchers looked at 87 soccer players from Texas, average age 14, who sustained a concussion during play and were treated at a pediatric sports medicine clinic. Two-thirds of the injured players were girls. Nearly 52 percent of girls returned to playing in a game or practice on the same day as their concussion, compared with just 17 percent of boys. The study was presented this weekend at the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) annual meeting, in Chicago. Research presented at meetings is considered preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed journal. "The girl soccer players were ... Read more

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Youth Football Ups Odds of Brain Problems in Adulthood

Posted 19 Sep 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Sept. 19, 2017 – Kids who start playing tackle football before age 12 have a higher risk of mental and behavioral problems in adulthood than their counterparts who began playing at older ages, a new study suggests. Researchers say playing tackle football at a younger age boosted the odds of later problems with behavioral control, apathy, thinking and decision-making by twofold compared to other players. They also said the risk of clinical depression rose by threefold in these players compared to their counterparts who started playing at older ages. "These findings were independent of the total number of seasons the participants played football or at what level they played, such as high school, college or professional," said study lead author Michael Alosco, a post-graduate fellow at Boston University's Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE) Center. However, these findings ... Read more

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Football Fans Still Loyal Despite Concerns About Players' Brains

Posted 10 Sep 2017 by Drugs.com

SUNDAY, Sept. 10, 2017 – Football remains America's favorite professional sport, even though a majority of fans admit they're concerned about brain injuries to players, according to a new survey. Among 1,000 Americans questioned, 77 percent of those who follow pro football believe head injuries for players pose a major problem for the sport. Fifteen percent said it is a minor problem, while 6 percent don't consider it a problem. In addition, the University of Massachusetts Lowell-Washington Post poll revealed that more than 80 percent believe there is either certainly or probably settled science that playing football causes brain injuries. Only one in 10 said that is either probably false or certainly false. Long-term damage caused by repeated blows to the head has garnered much attention in recent years. A study published in July in the Journal of the American Medical Association said ... Read more

Related support groups: Alzheimer's Disease, Head Injury, Encephalopathy, Head Injury with Intracranial Hemorrhage, Head Imaging, Head Injury with Loss of Consciousness

Health Tip: Identify Symptoms of a Concussion

Posted 28 Aug 2017 by Drugs.com

-- A concussion is a brain injury resulting from an abrupt hit to the head. It causes the head and brain to move back and forth quickly, resulting in a chemical change in the brain. It may be difficult to determine if someone has suffered a concussion. The U.S. National Library of Medicine says key symptoms of concussion include: Convulsions or seizures Drowsiness or inability to wake up A headache that gets worse and does not go away Weakness, numbness or decreased coordination Repeated vomiting or nausea Confusion Slurred speech Loss of consciousness Read more

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Bicyclist Deaths Rise in U.S., Men Are Likely Victims

Posted 24 Aug 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Aug. 24, 2017 – Bicyclist deaths on U.S. roadways are up significantly, and men – not kids – are commonly the victims, a new report finds. Biking deaths rose 12 percent in 2015, the latest year for which figures are available, according to the Governors Highway Safety Association. This jump was the largest among any group that uses roadways. Historically, most fatal bicycle crashes involved children and teens. Now, 85 percent of bicyclists killed on the road are men, the report said. And of the 818 bicyclists killed in 2015, the average age was 45. "We need to ensure that bicyclists and motorists can share roads safely," said Chris Mullen, director of technology research at State Farm, which funded the report. "Unfortunately, bicyclists are vulnerable and much more susceptible to serious injury or death when on the roads with vehicles," Mullen said in an association news ... Read more

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More Evidence Contact Sports Can Affect the Brain

Posted 22 Aug 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Aug. 22, 2017 – Playing contact sports like football or ice hockey can alter the structure and function of the brain, Canadian researchers report. Brain scans showed that these changes were particularly pronounced in sports that have the greatest risk of body contact. "There is growing concern about the risk of collisions in sport. However, most of the research has focused on retired professional athletes with decades of exposure to head impacts," said lead researcher Nathan Churchill. He's a post-doctoral fellow in the neuroscience research program at St. Michael's Hospital in Toronto. "Far less is known about the consequences of repeated body-to-body contact for young, active athletes," he said. In a group of college athletes, researchers found differences in the brains of both men and women for a variety of contact and collision sports, compared with those in non-contact ... Read more

Related support groups: Head Injury, Encephalopathy, Diagnosis and Investigation, Head Injury with Intracranial Hemorrhage, Head Imaging, Head Injury with Loss of Consciousness

Study Tests Sound Waves to Monitor Pressure Inside the Skull

Posted 8 Aug 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Aug. 8, 2017 – A noninvasive method of monitoring pressure inside the skull – using sound waves – shows promise, researchers report. Brain disease or a head injury can cause brain tissue to swell, as well as an increase in the volume of fluid that surrounds and protects the brain. This can cause pressure within the skull to rise, and serious complications and even death can result. Continuous monitoring lets doctors know if and when they must take steps to lower the pressure. Currently, to monitor intracranial pressure, a hole is drilled into the skull and sensor-equipped catheters are inserted. This procedure carries risks such as bleeding, infection and damage to brain tissue, but no noninvasive ways to monitor pressure are available, the study authors said. German researchers tested an experimental noninvasive method on 14 patients and got encouraging results, according ... Read more

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Health Tip: Supervise Kids Near Cars

Posted 3 Aug 2017 by Drugs.com

-- Allowing kids to play unsupervised in a road or driveway is a recipe for injury. Safe Kids Worldwide says you can help prevent a tragedy by: Walking around your car before you leave to make sure there are no children playing nearby. Checking for toys, bikes or pets near your car, which could attract children. Holding the hands of small children when you're in a driveway, crossing the road or in a parking lot. Read more

Related support groups: Head Injury, Fracture, bone, Compression Fracture of Vertebral Column, Head Injury with Intracranial Hemorrhage, Prevention of Fractures, Head Injury with Loss of Consciousness

Combined MRI Might Help Predict Brain Damage in Boxers

Posted 3 Aug 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 2, 2017 – Brain injuries among pro football players are in the headlines, but pro fighters often suffer damaging head injuries, too. Now, research with boxers and mixed martial arts professionals suggests that combination MRI technology can help pinpoint which injuries might lead to brain damage. In the boxing ring, as on the football field, recurring blows to the head can cause mild traumatic brain injury. Over time, this can lead to progressive brain disorders like chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), and create problems with mood and movement. A study published this week found that 110 of 111 brains of deceased National Football League players whose brains were autopsied showed signs of CTE. Currently, the disease can only be diagnosed with an autopsy, but scientists are seeking to improve detection. Previous studies have focused on the brain cells in gray matter ... Read more

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