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Head Imaging News

NHL Veterans Pledge Their Brains to Research

Posted 2 days 22 hours ago by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Feb. 23, 2017 – Several former National Hockey League players have joined the growing number of pro athletes who have pledged their brains to research on chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) – a devastating brain disease that has been linked to repetitive head trauma. The Concussion Legacy Foundation announced that four former professional hockey players plan to donate their brains to the organization. They include Stanley Cup Champion Shawn McEachern, who played in the NHL for 14 years, scoring 256 goals in his career. "This is something I really want to do to help the sport long-term," McEachern said in a news release from the foundation. "I would tell my friends the same thing, that this is something we can all do to raise awareness and help the sport. I have three kids that play hockey, I coach a prep school team and I'm a former player, so I know how important this ... Read more

Related support groups: Encephalopathy, Diagnosis and Investigation, Head Imaging

Bleeding Strokes Take Heavy Toll on Brain

Posted 4 days ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 22, 2017 – Survivors of the most deadly type of stroke face a higher risk for developing depression and dementia, new research suggests. Often called "bleeding strokes," hemorrhagic strokes occur when a blood vessel ruptures and leaks blood into the brain. Conversely, the more common ischemic stroke happens after a blood vessel is blocked in the brain. "Our study changes the way we look at depression after a hemorrhagic stroke," said study author Dr. Alessandro Biffi, a neurologist at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. "Depression is not just an isolated phenomenon following a hemorrhagic stroke," said Biffi, who is also director of the hospital's Aging and Brain Health Research Group. "It may identify those who are likely to develop dementia, and this is important when these patients are evaluated, particularly in outpatient care settings," he said. Biffi and ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Diabetes, Type 2, Hypertension, Insulin Resistance, Diabetes Mellitus, Hypertensive Emergency, Intracranial Hemorrhage, Hypertensive Heart Disease, Head Imaging

Race May Play Role in Recurrent Stroke

Posted 4 days ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 22, 2017 – Strokes bring with them a heightened possibility of another attack, and new research suggests black patients may be at especially high risk for recurrence. The risk of recurrent stroke was up to 50 percent higher in black seniors who'd survived a stroke compared to their white peers, according to a report to be presented Wednesday at the International Stroke Conference in Houston. The finding "suggests that neurologists need to pay extra attention to older black Americans with regard to preventing future strokes," said Dr. Andrew Rogove, who reviewed the study. He directs stroke care at Southside Hospital, in Bay Shore, N.Y. In the study, researchers led by Karen Albright, of the University of Alabama in Birmingham, looked at the odds of recurrence for ischemic strokes, which result from a blocked blood vessel. According to the American Stroke Association, ... Read more

Related support groups: Aspirin, Ischemic Stroke, Excedrin, Transient Ischemic Attack, Aggrenox, Alka-Seltzer, Fiorinal, Excedrin Migraine, Ecotrin, Ischemic Stroke - Prophylaxis, Arthritis Pain, Fiorinal with Codeine, Arthritis Pain Formula, Bayer Aspirin, Soma Compound, Norgesic, Excedrin Extra Strength, Norgesic Forte, Percodan, Anacin

Repeat Head Hits May Not Put NFL Players at Risk of Motor Problems

Posted 6 days ago by Drugs.com

SUNDAY, Feb. 19, 2017 – Repeated hits to the head may not doom NFL players to suffer movement disorders after they retire, new research suggests. "We found that while the motor functions of former NFL players were not as good as other men their age, they were still within normal range and not related to repeated head injury," said study author Dr. Samuel Frank, of Harvard Medical School in Boston. Repeated head injuries have been linked to a devastating brain disease known as chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), the researchers noted in a news release from the American Academy of Neurology. Numerous NFL players have been diagnosed with CTE after their deaths. Performing an autopsy is the only way to definitively diagnose the condition. In January, a $1 billion concussion lawsuit settlement for former NFL players was upheld by the U.S. Supreme Court, despite legal challenges from ... Read more

Related support groups: Head Injury, Head Injury with Intracranial Hemorrhage, Head Injury w/ Intracranial Hemorrhage and Loss of Consciousness, Head Injury with Loss of Consciousness, Head Imaging

Imaging Study Confirms Brain Differences in People With ADHD

Posted 10 days ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 15, 2017 – Researchers who pinpointed brain differences in people with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) say their findings show the condition should be considered a brain disorder. The international study – the largest of its kind – included more than 1,700 people with ADHD and more than 1,500 without the disorder. Participants were between the ages of 4 and 63. "We hope that this will help to reduce stigma that ADHD is 'just a label' for difficult children or caused by poor parenting. This is definitely not the case, and we hope that this work will contribute to a better understanding of the disorder," said study author Martine Hoogman. ADHD is characterized by inattention, overactivity and impulsivity that can interfere with learning and relationships. Brain scans revealed that five brain regions in those with ADHD were smaller than in those without ... Read more

Related support groups: Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), Oppositional Defiant Disorder, Head Imaging, Executive Function Disorder

Experimental Test Can Spot Autism in Infancy

Posted 11 days ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 15, 2017 – In what they call a first, researchers say they can predict whether some infants under the age of 1 will actually develop autism in their second year. The new experimental technique, using standard brain screening, is designed to focus solely on newborns known to be at high risk for autism because they have an older sibling who has it. But the diagnostic breakthrough addresses a key problem that has confounded efforts to effectively screen for autism as quickly as possible: Babies typically don't show clear outward signs of the disorder until nearly the end of their second year of life. By using scans to peek into the shifting size, surface area and thickness of certain parts of a baby's cerebral cortex as a baby hits the 6-month and 12-month mark, investigators found that they could forecast autism risk with 90 percent accuracy. "These findings suggest a ... Read more

Related support groups: Autism, Asperger Syndrome, Diagnosis and Investigation, Body Imaging, Head Imaging

Space Reshapes Astronauts' Brains: Study

Posted 17 days ago by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Feb. 9, 2017 – Astronauts' brains change shape while in space, a new study indicates. Brain scans of astronauts before and after spaceflight found their brains compress and expand during space missions. The findings could lead to new ways to treat health conditions that affect brain function, according to the University of Michigan researchers. The NASA-funded study included 12 astronauts who spent two weeks on the Space Shuttle and 14 who spent six months on the International Space Station. MRIs showed that all had increases and decreases in gray matter in different parts of the brain. Those changes were greater the longer the astronauts spent in space. "We found large regions of gray matter volume decreases, which could be related to redistribution of cerebrospinal fluid in space," principal investigator Rachael Seidler said in a university news release. "Gravity is not ... Read more

Related support groups: Diagnosis and Investigation, Brain Anomalies incl Congenital, Head Imaging

Brain Differences Hint at Why Autism Is More Common in Males

Posted 18 days ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 8, 2017 – Structural differences in the male brain might explain why autism is more common in men than women, a new study suggests. Women were three times more likely to have autism spectrum disorder if their brain anatomy resembled more closely what is typically seen in male brains, the European researchers reported. "Specifically, these females had much thicker than normal cortical areas, a trait generally seen in male brains," said Dr. Matthew Lorber, acting director of child and adolescent psychiatry at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City. "This study is certainly not conclusive, but it does propose a reason why autism is found so much more frequently in males," said Lorber, who was not involved in the study. This could mean there's something about the way the male brain is structured that makes men more apt to develop autism, although the study did not prove that ... Read more

Related support groups: Autism, Asperger Syndrome, Head Imaging

Brain Scans Let 'Locked-In' ALS Patients Communicate

Posted 31 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Jan. 31, 2017 – Brain imaging enabled four severely "locked-in" patients – all conscious and aware but unable to communicate – to answer yes-and-no questions, researchers report. One patient, at the request of his family, was asked whether he'd allow his daughter to marry her boyfriend. Nine out of 10 times, he said no, the researchers said. Scientists were impressed by the study findings, which involved advanced brain-computer technology. "This is at the frontier in terms of communication with patients who have locked-in syndrome," said Marie-Christine Nizzi. She is a psychology instructor with the Mind, Brain and Behavior Initiative at Harvard University. "Researchers in this study are cautious but they find that, most of the time, measuring the oxygen in specific areas of the brain allowed them to identify the sentences that patients knew were true versus sentences they ... Read more

Related support groups: Ischemic Stroke, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, Head Imaging

Can Breath Test Detect Stomach Cancers Earlier?

Posted 31 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Jan. 31, 2017 – A breath test to detect stomach and esophageal cancers shows promise, researchers say. The test measures five chemicals in the breath. It was 85 percent accurate in detecting these cancers in more than 300 patients, the new study found. Each year, 1.4 million cases of cancer of the stomach and esophagus (the tube leading from the throat to the stomach) are diagnosed worldwide. Both tend to be diagnosed at a late stage and the five-year survival rate for the two cancers is 15 percent, the researchers said. Findings from the study were presented Monday at the European Cancer Congress (ECC). "At present the only way to diagnose esophageal cancer or stomach cancer is with endoscopy. This method is expensive, invasive and has some risk of complications," study author Dr. Sheraz Markar said in an ECC news release. Markar is from Imperial College London in England. ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Head and Neck Cancer, Diagnosis and Investigation, Gastric Cancer, Salivary Gland Cancer, Head Imaging

Brain Scans May Shed Light on Bipolar Disorder-Suicide Risk

Posted 31 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Jan. 31, 2017 – Among teens and young adults with bipolar disorder, researchers have linked brain differences to an increased suicide risk. About half of people with bipolar disorder – marked by extreme mood swings – attempt suicide and as many as one in five dies by suicide, the study authors said. For the new study, teens and young adults with bipolar disorder underwent brain scans. Compared with those who had not attempted suicide, those who had attempted suicide had slightly less volume and activity in areas of the brain that regulate emotion and impulses, and in the white matter that connects those areas. "The findings suggest that the frontal cortex is not working as well as it should to regulate the circuitry," said study senior author Dr. Hilary Blumberg. "That can lead to more extreme emotional pain, difficulties in generating alternate solutions to suicide and ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Bipolar Disorder, Lexapro, Zoloft, Cymbalta, Effexor, Prozac, Major Depressive Disorder, Seroquel, Celexa, Citalopram, Paxil, Sertraline, Abilify, Pristiq, Amitriptyline, Venlafaxine, Fluoxetine, Effexor XR, Mania

Bilingual People May Have an Edge Against Alzheimer's

Posted 31 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Jan. 30, 2017 – People who speak two or more languages appear to weather the ravages of Alzheimer's disease better than people who have only mastered one language, a new Italian study suggests. Bilingual people with Alzheimer's outperformed single-language speakers in short- and long-term memory tasks, even though scans showed more severe deterioration in brain metabolism among the bilingual participants, the scientists said. The ability to speak two languages appears to provide the brain with more resilience to withstand damage from Alzheimer's, said lead researcher Dr. Daniela Perani, a professor of psychology at Vita-Salute San Raffaele University in Milan. The more often a person swapped between two languages during their lifetime, the more capable their brains became of switching to alternate pathways that maintained thinking skills even as Alzheimer's damage accumulated, ... Read more

Related support groups: Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Arteriosclerotic Dementia, Diagnosis and Investigation, Head Imaging

Study Explores Electrical Brain Stimulation to Treat Bulimia

Posted 25 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 25, 2017 – Electrical stimulation of the brain may temporarily ease the symptoms of the eating disorder bulimia nervosa, a small study suggests. The study included two men and 37 women with bulimia who underwent 20-minute sessions of transcranial direct current stimulation to an area of the brain involved with reward processing and self-regulation. There was also one sham session where the electrode stimulation lasted only 30 seconds. Participants then reported their desire to binge eat, fear of weight gain, general mood and frequency of bulimic behaviors in the 24 hours following treatment, the researchers said. The patients reported a reduction in bulimia symptoms after brain stimulation. The findings were published online Jan. 25 in the journal PLOS One. "Although these are modest, early findings, there is a clear improvement in symptoms and decision-making abilities ... Read more

Related support groups: Binge Eating Disorder, Eating Disorder, Anorexia, Bulimia, Anorexia nervosa, Diagnosis and Investigation, Anorexia/Feeding Problems, Head Imaging

Could a Therapy for Irregular Heartbeat Harm the Brain?

Posted 24 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Jan. 24, 2017 – Catheter ablation is a common treatment for a form of irregular heartbeat known as premature ventricular contractions. Now, a small new study suggests the approach may put some patients at risk for brain injury. The findings are preliminary, but are "relevant to a large number of patients undergoing this procedure," study senior author Dr. Gregory Marcus said in a news release from the University of California, San Francisco. The study suggests that the procedure may help encourage the formation of brain lesions. Marcus, who directs clinical research at UCSF's department of cardiology, said he hopes the research "will inspire many studies to understand the meaning of and how to mitigate these lesions." The study included 18 patients who underwent catheter ablation for premature ventricular contractions (PVCs) – a type of abnormal heartbeat originating in a ... Read more

Related support groups: Bleeding Disorder, Arrhythmia, Diagnosis and Investigation, Brain Anomalies incl Congenital, Coagulation Defects and Disorders, Premature Ventricular Depolarizations, Head Imaging

MRIs Might Help Guide Preemies' Neurological Care

Posted 19 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 18, 2017 – MRI scans shortly after birth might help determine which premature babies have sustained a brain injury that will affect their development, a new study reports. It appears that doctors can predict which premature infants will suffer from future motor, thinking and language problems by using MRI scans to identify specific injuries to the white matter in their brain, said senior researcher Dr. Steven Miller. Miller is head of neurology at the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto, Canada. Fluctuations in blood pressure that occur regularly in preemies might cause a lack of blood flow or oxygen to the brain, damaging the white matter, Miller explained. In addition, said Dr. Gregory Lodygensky, a clinical investigator at the University of Montreal, white matter injuries also occur due to inflammation and infection suffered by the very vulnerable infants. ... Read more

Related support groups: Premature Labor, Diagnosis and Investigation, Apnea of Prematurity, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation, Head Imaging

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