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Gulf War Syndrome News

Related terms: Gulf War Illness, GWS, GWI, Desert Storm Syndrome, Persian Gulf Syndrome

Why Kicking the Opioid Habit Can Be So Tough

Posted 20 Jul 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, July 20, 2016 – He was 26, a specialist fifth class with the U.S. Army, and stationed abroad, when an accident on the German autobahn sent him careening through the windshield of his car. The now 60-year-old veteran prefers to withhold his name, but not his story, of a decades-long struggle against chronic back pain and an addiction to the opioid painkillers he'd hoped would help him. "At first I was taking 50 milligrams [mg] of Percocet," the Colorado resident recalled. "Every day I'd wake up in pain. And every day I'd automatically pop a pill right away and go back to work. I didn't think anything of it – I'd just take Percocet in combination with hydrocodone [Vicodin], and it worked." However, "eventually it wasn't working anymore," he said. "I felt like I was putting a Band-Aid on a bullet wound, and I couldn't stand the pain." Then, over time, there was a "gradual ... Read more

Related support groups: Pain, Oxycodone, Back Pain, Percocet, OxyContin, Opiate Dependence, Opiate Withdrawal, Chronic Pain, Roxicodone, Drug Dependence, Endocet, Percocet 10/325, Substance Abuse, Roxicet, Acetaminophen/Oxycodone, Breakthrough Pain, Percocet 5/325, OxyIR, Toxic Reactions Incl Drug and Substance Abuse, Percocet 7.5/325

Predeployment Riskiest Time for Military Suicide Attempts

Posted 25 May 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, May 25, 2016 – Suicide attempts in the military aren't necessarily combat-driven. At the height of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, the U.S. Army soldiers most likely to try to kill themselves were never deployed, new research shows. Moreover, risk was greatest just two months into service, according to the study of more than 163,000 soldiers. But the findings aren't a sign that going to war protects soldiers against suicide. "It is more likely that those who are not deployed are already at a higher risk for suicide, and that is one of the reasons they were not cleared to deploy," said Alan Peterson, professor and chief of behavioral medicine at University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio. Peterson, a military mental health researcher, wasn't involved in the study. Suicide rates within the military exploded during the wars of the last 15 years, said study lead ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Major Depressive Disorder, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Dysthymia, Substance Abuse, Toxic Reactions Incl Drug and Substance Abuse, Gulf War Syndrome

Gulf War Veterans' Illnesses Still Poorly Understood: Report

Posted 12 Feb 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Feb. 11, 2016 – Scientists and doctors still lack good insight into Gulf War illness and other health problems plaguing U.S. veterans of the 1990-91 Persian Gulf War, a new report says. More than $500 million in U.S. government-funded research on Gulf War veterans was conducted between 1994 and 2014, producing many results. But there has been little overall progress in understanding the health effects of serving in that war, according to an Institute of Medicine (IOM) committee. Echoing conclusions of a 2010 IOM report, the new U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs-sponsored study said Gulf War veterans appear to be at increased risk for Gulf War illness, chronic fatigue syndrome, digestive disorders, and such mental health conditions as post-traumatic stress disorder, anxiety, depression and substance abuse. The review of available scientific and medical literature also found ... Read more

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Study: Causes of Gulf War Illness Pinpointed

Posted 2 Feb 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Feb. 1, 2016 – Exposure to pesticides and other toxins appears to be the cause of Gulf War illness in U.S. veterans, a new analysis states. The Boston University researchers reviewed studies on Gulf War illness, and said their findings "clearly and consistently" show a link between the disorder and exposure to pesticides and taking pyridostigmine bromide (PB) pills, which were meant to protect troops against the effects of nerve gas. There's also evidence of a connection between Gulf War illness and exposure to the nerve gas agents sarin and cyclosarin, and to oil well fire emissions, according to the findings published in the January issue of the journal Cortex. These toxins damaged troops' nervous and immune systems, and reduced the amount of white and gray matter in veterans' brains, said study leader Roberta White in a news release from the university. White is a professor ... Read more

Related support groups: Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Mestinon, Pyridostigmine, Central Nervous System Disorders, Mestinon Timespan, Nerve Agent Pretreatment, Nerve Agent Poisoning, Regonol, Gulf War Syndrome

Are There 2 Types of Gulf War Illness?

Posted 17 Jun 2013 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, June 14 – U.S. veterans with Gulf War illness complain of different types of symptoms, and researchers now think they know why: There may be two distinct forms of the illness, depending on which areas of the brain have atrophied. "Our findings help explain and validate what these veterans have long said about their illness," said study lead author Rakib Rayhan, a Georgetown University Medical Center researcher. For the study, published online June 14 in the journal PLoS One, the research team conducted brain scans of 28 veterans with Gulf War illness before and after they underwent exercise stress tests. For 18 veterans, pain levels increased after exercise stress, and the scans showed a loss of brain matter in regions associated with pain regulation. Before exercise, these 18 veterans showed increased use of a part of the brain called the basal ganglia when asked to do mental ... Read more

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Brain Changes Could Contribute to Gulf War Illness: Study

Posted 23 Mar 2013 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, March 21 – Many of the soldiers who served in the first Gulf War suffer a poorly understood collection of symptoms known as Gulf War illness, and now a small study has identified brain changes in these vets that may give hints for developing a test for diagnosing the condition. Around 25 percent of the nearly 700,000 U.S. troops that were deployed to countries including Iraq, Kuwait and Saudi Arabia began experiencing a range of physical and mental health problems during or shortly after their tour that persist to this day. Common symptoms are widespread pain; fatigue; mood and memory disruptions; and gastrointestinal, respiratory and skin problems. New research suggests that structural changes in the white matter of the brains of these vets could be at least partly to blame for their symptoms. White matter is made up of a network of nerve fibers or axons, which are the long ... Read more

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U.S. Vets With Gulf War Syndrome Need Individualized Treatment: Report

Posted 23 Jan 2013 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 23 – A one-size-fits-all approach to treating U.S. veterans with Gulf War Syndrome does not work, and therapy needs to be tailored to meet each patient's needs, according to a new Institute of Medicine report released Wednesday. The document – written as part of the institute's congressionally mandated Gulf War and Health series – evaluates the various treatments for Gulf War Syndrome in veterans of the 1991 conflict and recommends best approaches to managing their care. The official name for Gulf War Syndrome is chronic multisystem illness (CMI), which is defined as having symptoms in at least two of six categories – fatigue, mood and cognition (thinking ability and memory), musculoskeletal, gastrointestinal, respiratory and neurologic – for at least six months. The condition affects at least one-third of veterans of the 1991 Persian Gulf War. Similar symptoms have ... Read more

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