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Blood Pressure-Lowering Diet May Help Treat Gout

Posted 11 days ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Aug. 15, 2016 – A diet that helps people reduce high blood pressure may also offer a non-drug treatment for gout – a type of inflammatory arthritis, a new study suggests. The clinical trial included more than 400 people who ate the so-called DASH diet (which features high amounts of fruits, vegetables, low-fat dairy and low amounts of fats and saturated fats), or a typical American diet. Along with lowering blood pressure, the DASH diet also significantly lowers levels of uric acid. Uric acid crystals are known to cause gout, the Arthritis Foundation says. The DASH diet's effect for some people with gout was so strong that it nearly matched the effectiveness of drugs normally used to treat the painful condition, the study authors said. The findings suggest that dietary changes could offer an effective and safe way to lower uric acid levels. That would possibly prevent gout ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Obesity, Hypertension, Weight Loss, Gout, Gout - Acute, Gouty Arthritis, Gout - Prophylaxis, Hypertensive Heart Disease

Steroid May Be Safe, Effective Gout Treatment, Study Finds

Posted 23 Feb 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Feb. 22, 2016 – A steroid pill may be as good as a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) for treating painful gout, new research suggests. Researchers who compared the steroid prednisolone with the arthritis medication indomethacin found both drugs offered a similar degree of pain reduction. And while indomethacin (Indocin) appeared to cause more minor side effects, neither treatment prompted serious complications, the researchers said. Smaller investigations have pointed in the same direction, said study lead author Dr. Timothy Rainer, a professor of emergency medicine at Cardiff University in Wales. But because the new findings are the product of a "larger and better-designed" effort, Rainer said steroid pills may gain standing among gout experts who usually stick with NSAIDs as their first-line treatment. The bottom line is that there are choices, said Dr. Philip ... Read more

Related support groups: Gout, Prednisolone, Indomethacin, Pred Forte, Gout - Acute, Indocin, Orapred, Omnipred, Gouty Arthritis, Prelone, Econopred Plus, Econopred, Predalone 50, Gout - Prophylaxis, Blephamide, Pred Mild, Uric Acid Nephrolithiasis, Prednisol, Orapred ODT, PediaPred

High Uric-Acid Levels, Lower Risk of Parkinson's?

Posted 13 Jan 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 13, 2016 – Men with high levels of uric acid in their blood may be less likely to develop Parkinson's disease, a new study suggests. Researchers compared about 400 people in ongoing studies who developed Parkinson's disease and more than 1,200 people in the same studies who did not develop the movement disorder. Men with the highest levels of uric acid (also called urate) were nearly 40 percent less likely to develop Parkinson's disease than those with the lowest levels, according to the study published online Jan. 13 in the journal Neurology. "These results suggest that urate could protect against Parkinson's or slow the progression of the disease in its very early stages before symptoms are seen," study author Dr. Xiang Gao, of Pennsylvania State University, said in a news release from the American Academy of Neurology. "The findings support more research on whether ... Read more

Related support groups: Gout, Parkinson's Disease, Gout - Acute, Gouty Arthritis, Parkinsonian Tremor, Diagnosis and Investigation, Parkinsonism, Gout - Prophylaxis

FDA Approves Zurampic (lesinurad) to Treat High Blood Uric Acid Levels Associated with Gout

Posted 30 Dec 2015 by Drugs.com

December 22, 2015 – The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Zurampic (lesinurad) to treat high levels of uric acid in the blood (hyperuricemia) associated with gout, when used in combination with a xanthine oxidase inhibitor (XOI), a type of drug approved to reduce the production of uric acid in the body. Gout is a painful form of arthritis caused by the buildup of too much uric acid in the body, and usually appears first as redness, soreness, and swelling in the big toe. Uric acid in the blood is produced by the breakdown of substances called purines, which are found in all the body’s tissues. Uric acid usually dissolves in the blood then passes through the kidneys and out of the body in urine. Uric acid can build up in the blood, a condition called hyperuricemia. This occurs when the body increases the amount of uric acid it makes, the kidneys do not get rid of enough u ... Read more

Related support groups: Gout, Zurampic, Lesinurad

Zurampic Approved for Gout

Posted 23 Dec 2015 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 23, 2015 – Zurampic (lesinurad) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to control blood levels of uric acid associated with gout. Gout, a form of arthritis, commonly emerges as pain, redness and swelling in the big toe. Uric acid normally is a natural waste product that's passed through the kidneys. But when it builds up in the body, crystals may form and lead to gout. Zurampic, approved in combination with a second drug called xanthine oxidase, helps the kidneys avoid reabsorbing uric acid, then aids the kidneys in excreting uric acid from the body, the FDA said in a news release. Zurampic was evaluated in clinical studies involving more than 1,500 people. Those treated with the drug combination saw a drop in uric acid levels, compared to those who took placebos. The most common side effects of Zurampic included headache, a rise in a blood compound ... Read more

Related support groups: Gout, Zurampic, Lesinurad

Gout's Silver Lining: A Lower Risk for Alzheimer's?

Posted 5 Mar 2015 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, March 5, 2015 – The painful and often debilitating arthritic condition known as gout may offer patients an unexpected bonus: a lower risk for Alzheimer's disease. A new study finds that gout – or the high uric acid level that drives the inflammatory condition – may shield against the dementia. "Our work shows the potential protective effect of a high level of uric acid and gout against the development of Alzheimer's disease," said Dr. Hyon Choi, a professor of medicine in the division of rheumatology, allergy and immunology at the Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School in Boston. The study comes after prior research that had suggested that people with gout might also have a lower risk for other neurodegenerative conditions such as Parkinson's disease. Still, the study can't prove cause-and-effect, and "this is just an initial finding," Choi added. "One ... Read more

Related support groups: Gout, Alzheimer's Disease

Gout Attacks More Common at Night: Study

Posted 11 Dec 2014 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Dec. 11, 2014 – Acute gout attacks occur two times more often during the night and early morning than during the day, a new study finds. "It is speculated that lower body temperature, nighttime dehydration, or a nocturnal dip of cortisol levels may contribute to the risk of gout attacks at night," study author Dr. Hyon Choi, of Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School, said in a journal news release. "Despite the possibility of a nighttime link to gout, no study prior to our current investigation has looked at the association between gout attack risk and the time of day," Choi added. More than 8 million Americans have gout, according to the American College of Rheumatology. The current study included more than 700 gout patients. Their average age was 54. They were mostly white, and mostly male, according to the study. The researchers tracked their health for one ... Read more

Related support groups: Gout

Gout May Be Linked to Raised Diabetes Risk: Study

Posted 6 Oct 2014 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Oct. 3, 2014 – Gout, a form of inflammatory arthritis, appears to increase the risk of type 2 diabetes, especially in women, a new study finds. Researchers followed more than 35,000 gout sufferers in the United Kingdom and found that women with gout were 71 percent more likely to develop diabetes compared with people without gout. For men, the increased risk was 22 percent. "Gout seems to be contributing to the risk of diabetes independently of other diabetes risk factors, such as obesity," said lead researcher Dr. Hyon Choi, from the division of rheumatology, allergy, and immunology at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. Gout causes intense pain and swelling in single joints, most often the feet, especially the joint at the base of the big toe. More than 3 million Americans suffer from the condition, men more often than women, according to the American College of ... Read more

Related support groups: Diabetes, Type 2, Gout

Common Gout Drug Tied to Lower Risk of Early Death in Study

Posted 28 Mar 2014 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, March 28, 2014 – A drug often used to treat gout may reduce the risk of premature death in patients with this common form of arthritis, according to a new study. Previous research has associated gout with an increased risk of early death. This study examined how allopurinol – the most widely used medication for gout – might affect that risk. Allopurinol causes a potentially fatal reaction in about one of 260 patients who uses the drug, which has made some doctors reluctant to prescribe it, according to background information in the study. The researchers looked at data from over 5,900 gout patients in the United Kingdom who were prescribed allopurinol and compared them to a group of gout patients who did not take the drug. Patients who took allopurinol were 11 percent less likely to die from all causes during the study period than those who did not take the medication. ... Read more

Related support groups: Gout, Allopurinol, Gouty Arthritis, Zyloprim, Lopurin, Aloprim

CT Scans Might Help Diagnose Gout in Some Cases

Posted 26 Mar 2014 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, March 26, 2014 – CT scans can help detect gout that's been missed by the current standard testing method, a new study suggests. Gout is a common and painful form of arthritis caused by a buildup of uric acid in the body. The standard test – called needle aspiration – involves taking fluid or tissue samples from a gout-affected joint and checking them for uric acid crystals. This test usually detects gout in patients, but not always. In this study, Mayo Clinic researchers found that dual energy CT scans detected gout in one-third of patients who had negative results on the needle aspiration test. The CT scans were particularly effective in patients who'd had several gout-like episodes but had remained undiagnosed. After CT scans pinpointed what appeared to be uric acid crystals, ultrasound-guided needle aspiration was used to collect samples from those areas, according to ... Read more

Related support groups: Gout, Diagnosis and Investigation

Health Tip: Know Risk Factors for Gout

Posted 7 Aug 2013 by Drugs.com

-- Gout is characterized by a buildup of uric acid in the body, leading to swollen, painful joints. The U.S. National Institute on Aging mentions these common risk factors for gout: Being male. Having a family history of gout. Being overweight. Eating a poor diet. Drinking alcohol. Having too much uric acid in the blood, a condition called hyperuricemia. Read more

Related support groups: Gout

Will New Gout Findings Get a Toehold?

Posted 12 Jun 2013 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, June 12 – The big toe is not the biggest culprit in gout flare-ups, contrary to popular belief, a new study reports. Researchers from the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., found that people with the highest risk of repeated cases of gout are those whose gout first appears in other joints, such as the knee or elbow, rather than in the joints of the big toe. Gout is a painful form of arthritis caused by uric acid buildup in the body. Continuing to take medication is essential to prevent recurrences, the researchers said. "Because patients often think that a gout flare-up means their medications are not working, they may stop medications like allopurinol. It is especially important for these patients to continue taking gout medication to prevent flare-ups," study co-author Dr. Eric Matteson, rheumatology chair, said in a Mayo news release. The study was scheduled for ... Read more

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Scientists ID New Genetic Connection for Gout

Posted 28 Dec 2012 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Dec. 28 – To help explain why the debilitating arthritic condition known as gout strikes some people and not others, a new genetic analysis has identified 18 new mutations that appear to boost blood levels of uric acid, the key trigger for a gout attack. The current effort involved an analysis of data concerning more than 140,000 people, gleaned from 70 independent studies conducted in Europe, the United States, Japan and Australia. "Abnormal levels of uric acid have been associated with various common diseases and conditions, but causal relationships are not always clear," said study author Dr. Veronique Vitart of the Medical Research Council Human Genetics Unit at the University of Edinburgh, in Scotland, in a school news release. "Gaining insight into the genetic components of uric acid levels offers a very useful tool to tackle these issues and to further our understanding ... Read more

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Gout Management Is Focus of New Guidelines

Posted 2 Oct 2012 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Oct. 2 – Educating gout patients on diet, lifestyle choices and treatment objectives is among the recommendations in new guidelines to help patients and doctors fight the painful disease. Gout, which affects nearly 4 percent of American adults, is one of the most common forms of inflammatory arthritis. Acute gout attacks can be debilitating and reduce patients' quality of life. Diagnosed cases of gout in the United States have risen over the past 20 years and now affect 8.3 million people. The American College of Rheumatology funded a collaborative effort among U.S. researchers to develop the new guidelines that educate patients in effective methods to prevent gout attacks and provide doctors with recommended treatments for long-term management of the disease. Gout is caused by elevated levels of uric acid, which lead to the formation of crystals that are deposited in joints, ... Read more

Related support groups: Gout

Gout Flare-ups Rise Sharply With Certain Foods: Study

Posted 31 May 2012 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, May 31 – Meat, seafood and other foods rich in compounds called purines are associated with a fivefold increased risk of immediate gout flare-ups, a new study shows. Gout is a form of arthritis that often first occurs in the big toe. Anecdotal evidence has suggested that purine-rich foods can trigger gout attacks, but it hasn't been clear whether they cause immediate attacks. The study included more than 600 patients with gout, most of whom were men and who had an average age of 54. The patients were followed for a year. During that time, the patients had a total of nearly 1,250 gout attacks, most of which occurred in the toe joints, said Dr. Yuqing Zhang and colleagues at the Boston University School of Medicine. The average amount of dietary purines consumed during a two-day period without gout attacks was 1.66 grams, compared with 2.03 grams in the two days before an ... Read more

Related support groups: Gout

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Gout - Acute, Gouty Arthritis, Gout - Prophylaxis, Pseudogout

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