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Gene Therapy May Fight Brain Cancer's Return

Posted 27 Oct 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Oct. 27, 2017 – A new form of gene therapy shows promise in battling recurrent brain cancer. The phase 1 clinical trial included 56 patients with recurrent high-grade glioma brain cancer. Three years after the gene therapy treatment, more than a quarter of the patients were still alive. Median survival for patients was 14.4 months, compared with eight months typically seen in patients. "Given the deadly nature of this disease, three-year survival is rarely reported in the recurrent setting. It is notable that the survival benefit was seen across a range of patients, and not just limited to patients with specific genetic mutations," said study author Dr. Clark Chen. Chen is head of the department of neurosurgery at the University of Minnesota Medical School. He made his comments in news release from the American Association for Cancer Research. The study was sponsored by therapy ... Read more

Related support groups: Fluorouracil, Efudex, Brain Tumor, Carac, Glioblastoma Multiforme, Pituitary Tumor, Diagnosis and Investigation, Acromegaly, Fluoroplex, Pituitary Adenoma, Malignant Glioma, Tolak, Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma, Angioblastoma, Adrucil, Diclofenac/fluorouracil, Anaplastic Astrocytoma, Fluorac, Efudex Occlusion Pack

FDA Approves Mvasi (bevacizumab-awwb), a Biosimilar to Avastin

Posted 17 Sep 2017 by Drugs.com

September 14, 2017 – The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Mvasi (bevacizumab-awwb) as a biosimilar to Avastin (bevacizumab) for the treatment of multiple types of cancer. Mvasi is the first biosimilar approved in the U.S. for the treatment of cancer. “Bringing new biosimilars to patients, especially for diseases where the cost of existing treatments can be high, is an important way to help spur competition that can lower healthcare costs and increase access to important therapies,” said FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb, M.D. “We’ll continue to work hard to ensure that biosimilar medications are brought to the market quickly, through a process that makes certain that these new medicines meet the FDA’s rigorous gold standard for safety and effectiveness.” Mvasi is approved for the treatment of adult patients with certain colorectal, lung, brain, kidney and cervical cancers ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Lung Cancer, Colorectal Cancer, Renal Cell Carcinoma, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Avastin, Cervical Cancer, Glioblastoma Multiforme, Bevacizumab, Mvasi

Could the Zika Virus Help Battle a Deadly Brain Cancer?

Posted 5 Sep 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Sept. 5, 2017 – The Zika virus is well known for causing devastating brain defects in fetuses. But what if scientists could use that ability to do something good? Researchers report that they think they might be able to harness the virus' attraction to developing brain cells – instead of adult brain cells – as a potential treatment for a deadly type of brain cancer. In lab and animal experiments, scientists from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and the University of California, San Diego, showed – that the virus was able to target and destroy stem cells that drive the growth of a deadly and common type of brain tumor, known as a glioblastoma. "Our study is a first step towards the development of safe and effective strains of Zika virus that could become important tools in neuro-oncology and the treatment of glioblastoma," said study co-leader Michael ... Read more

Related support groups: Brain Tumor, Glioblastoma Multiforme, Insect Bites, Zika Virus Infection

Researchers ID Genes in Mice That Cause Aggressive Brain Cancer

Posted 14 Aug 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Aug. 14, 2017 – Researchers say they've identified specific gene combinations that can cause the aggressive brain cancer glioblastoma in mice. Using new technology that can also identify genetic triggers of other cancers, a Yale University-led team assessed the impact of mutations in more than 1,500 genetic combinations. They reported finding multiple combinations in living mice that could cause glioblastoma. Two of the mutations could make glioblastoma resistant to chemotherapy – a finding that could help doctors tailor treatments for individual patients, according to the researchers. "The human cancer genome is now mapped and thousands of new mutations were associated with cancer, but it has been difficult to prove which ones or their combinations actually cause cancer," co-corresponding author Sidi Chen said in a university news release. "We can also use this information to ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Brain Tumor, Glioblastoma Multiforme, Diagnosis and Investigation

Senate Prepares for Health Care Vote

Posted 25 Jul 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, July 25, 2017 – With Republican Sen. John McCain making a dramatic return to Washington, D.C., on Tuesday, the Senate is preparing to vote on a proposal that could begin – or end – the GOP's seven-year quest to dismantle Obamacare. The 80-year-old McCain has been home in Arizona since last week when he started treatment for a type of brain cancer called glioblastoma. In a statement, the respected six-term lawmaker said he "looks forward" to returning to work on health care legislation and other matters. The Senate is scheduled to vote Tuesday on whether to use as a template a health care bill that narrowly passed the House of Representative in May. That House bill, which would make substantial cuts to Medicaid, the government-run insurance program for low-income Americans, is unpopular with many Americans and even President Donald Trump has called it "mean." Majority Leader ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Glioblastoma Multiforme

Sen. John McCain Has Brain Cancer

Posted 20 Jul 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, July 20, 2017 – Sen. John McCain, a respected longtime lawmaker, former prisoner of war and the Republican presidential nominee in 2008, has been diagnosed with an aggressive brain cancer. A statement released by McCain's office Wednesday night said the cancer, known as a glioblastoma, was discovered after a procedure to remove a blood clot above his left eye last week at Mayo Clinic Hospital in Phoenix. "Subsequent tissue pathology revealed that a primary brain tumor known as a glioblastoma was associated with the blood clot," the statement said. "Treatment options may include a combination of chemotherapy and radiation." McCain, 80, who has represented Arizona in the Senate since 1986, is known for his independent nature. He was a former Navy pilot who was captured, tortured and held for more than 5 years as a prisoner during the Vietnam War. "Senator John McCain has always ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Brain Tumor, Glioblastoma Multiforme

Senator McCain Faces a Tough Cancer Foe

Posted 20 Jul 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, July 20, 2017 – Sen. John McCain faces an uphill battle fighting the aggressive cancer discovered in his brain last week, experts say. The cancer, glioblastoma, is the most common malignant tumor that originates in brain cells, as opposed to cancers that spread to the brain from elsewhere in the body, said Dr. Manmeet Ahluwalia, dean of the Cleveland Clinic's Rose Ella Burkhardt Brain Tumor and Neuro-Oncology Center. But it's a very tough cancer to treat. Glioblastoma is difficult to surgically remove, resists attempts to kill it with radiation and chemotherapy, and nearly always comes back, cancer experts said. "The tumor many times responds to treatment initially but it tends to grow back," said Dr. Kurt Jaeckle, a neuro-oncologist and co-director of the Gerald J. Glasser Brain Tumor Center at Overlook Medical Center's Atlantic Neuroscience Institute in New Jersey. "It's ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Brain Tumor, Glioblastoma Multiforme

Vaccine Targeting Brain Tumors Seems Safe in Study

Posted 15 Apr 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, April 14, 2017 – An experimental vaccine therapy shows promise in treating people with deadly glioblastoma brain cancer, researchers behind a small, preliminary study report. With current standard care, half of glioblastoma patients die within 15 months of diagnosis. Four of the 11 patients in this study survived for more than five years after vaccine/chemotherapy treatment, the Duke Cancer Institute research team said. "This is a small study, but it's one in a sequence of clinical trials we have conducted to explore the use of an immunotherapy that specifically targets a protein on glioblastoma tumors," said lead author Dr. Kristen Batich. "While not a controlled efficacy study, the survival results were surprising, and they suggest the possibility that combining the vaccine with a more intense regimen of this chemotherapy promotes a strong cooperative benefit," she added in a ... Read more

Related support groups: Glioblastoma Multiforme, Vaccination and Prophlaxis

'Electric Cap' Might Help Fight a Deadly Brain Tumor

Posted 3 Apr 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, April 3, 2017 – A cap that zaps tumors with electrical currents may boost survival in patients with a deadly brain cancer, new research suggests. The device is worn on the head and exposes glioblastoma cells to a rapidly alternating sequence of low-intensity electrical frequencies. This interrupts cancer cells' ability to function, the researchers said. According to study author Dr. Roger Stupp, a professor of neurological surgery at Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago, the cap is "an entirely different way to treat cancer. "Our results demonstrate a proof-of-concept that this treatment modality actually works, and can prevent tumor cells from growing and dividing," he added. "And it does increase the survival rate at two years, three years, and even at five years, in a substantial amount," said Stupp, who noted that the cap is "the first treatment ... Read more

Related support groups: Brain Tumor, Glioblastoma Multiforme

Survival Continues to Improve for Most Cancers

Posted 31 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, March 31, 2017 – Overall cancer death rates in the United States continue to fall, but racial gaps persist, a new report says. Death rates fell between 2010 and 2014 for 11 of the 16 most common cancers in men and for 13 of the most common types in women, including lung, colon, prostate and breast cancers. However, death rates rose for cancers of the liver, pancreas and brain in men and for the liver and uterus in women. And improvements in cancer survival weren't equal for all Americans. "While this report found that five-year survival for most types of cancer improved among both blacks and whites over the past several decades, racial disparities for many common cancers have persisted, and they may have increased for prostate cancer and female breast cancer," said Dr. Lynne Penberthy. She's associate director of the U.S. National Cancer Institute's Surveillance Research ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Breast Cancer, Prostate Cancer, Lung Cancer, Colorectal Cancer, Renal Cell Carcinoma, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Brain Tumor, Breast Cancer, Metastatic, Skin Cancer, Osteosarcoma, Ovarian Cancer, Melanoma, Pancreatic Cancer, Endometrial Cancer, Small Cell Lung Cancer, Breast Cancer - Adjuvant, Bladder Cancer, Cervical Cancer, Breast Cancer, Prevention

Seniors With Brain Cancer May Have Better Treatment Option

Posted 15 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, March 15, 2017 – Combined chemotherapy and radiation treatment appears to extend the lives of older patients with brain cancer, new research finds. The study involved more than 560 older patients with glioblastoma, the most common malignant brain cancer in adults. The average age of disease onset is 65 and there is no cure, according to the study. On average, patients who received the chemotherapy pill temozolomide plus a short course of radiation therapy survived two months longer than those who underwent radiation alone, an international team of researchers found. And, many patients in the combination treatment group survived nearly 14 months – about twice that compared to those who received radiation alone, the researchers reported. "Everyone benefited to a varying degree," said co-principal investigator Dr. Normand Laperriere. "There has been no clear standard of care ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Brain Tumor, Glioblastoma Multiforme, Temodar, Diagnosis and Investigation, Malignant Glioma, Temozolomide

Chemo Drug May Combat Serious Brain Tumor After All

Posted 22 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Dec. 22, 2016 – Some patients with a deadly brain tumor may respond to drugs previously believed to be ineffective against the cancer, a new study says. The findings highlight the importance of properly categorizing glioblastoma tumors in order to best tailor treatment to each patient, according to the researchers. Glioblastoma tumors are diagnosed in about 12,000 people in the United States each year. Half of patients with this type of tumor die within 15 months of diagnosis, the researchers said. There was hope that lives could be extended with a class of chemotherapy drugs called anti-angiogenic compounds. These drugs were designed to block the growth of new blood vessels in the tumor in an attempt to starve the tumor of oxygen and nutrients. But recently published findings from two large clinical trials concluded that an anti-angiogenic drug called bevacizumab did not ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Brain Tumor, Avastin, Glioblastoma Multiforme, Bevacizumab

Some Brain Cancer Patients Have Radiation Options: Study

Posted 26 Jul 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, July 26, 2016 – For some brain cancer patients, pinpoint radiation of tumors, known as stereotactic radiosurgery, appears to do less damage to mental abilities than whole brain radiation, a new study finds. Neither technique cures cancer that has spread to the brain, but both temporarily stop tumors from growing and equally extend survival, researchers said. Stereotactic radiosurgery is nonsurgical radiation that precisely targets tumor areas. When just a few lesions exist, this directed type of radiation appears to provide a better quality of life by not altering short-term memory and thinking skills, the study found. "We now have a better understanding of the toxicity of whole brain radiation, and we know that the toxicity of whole brain radiation is worse for patients than the recurrence of their cancer," said lead researcher Dr. Paul Brown, from the department of radiation ... Read more

Related support groups: Brain Tumor, Glioblastoma Multiforme, Malignant Glioma, History - Radiation Therapy, Angioblastoma

Brain Tumors More Common in Better Educated, Wealthier Folks: Study

Posted 21 Jun 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, June 20, 2016 – People who have a college education, a professional career or a big paycheck may be more likely to be diagnosed with a brain tumor than people who are less well-off or not as educated, a new study reports. Medical data for more than 4.3 million residents of Sweden revealed that people with higher education or better jobs were more likely to be found with one of three types of brain tumor – glioma, meningioma or acoustic neuroma. However, this doesn't necessarily mean that achievement in life increases the risk of brain tumors, said lead researcher Amal Khanolkar, a research associate with University College London's Institute of Child Health. People with money or a better education might be better able to notice something's wrong with their health. "People with higher education are perhaps more likely to detect symptoms and seek medical care earlier on," ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Brain Tumor, Glioblastoma Multiforme

Extensive Surgery Best for an Aggressive Brain Cancer: Study

Posted 16 Jun 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, June 16, 2016 – When it comes to battling a particularly aggressive form of brain tumor, more extensive surgeries may be best to boost patient survival, researchers have concluded. The brain cancer – called glioblastoma multiforme – is often treated with surgery, radiation therapy and chemotherapy. However, the ideal combination of treatments for this cancer isn't clear. One expert said glioblastoma surgeries are especially complicated. "Since this tumor infiltrates normal brain and is often indistinguishable from it, it is difficult to know where the tumor ends and normal brain begins," explained Dr. Raj Narayan, a neurosurgeon who reviewed the new study findings. "Therefore, an aggressive effort to remove 'all' of the tumor runs the risk of causing increased neurological deficits such as paralysis and loss of speech," said Narayan, who is chair of neurosurgery at North ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Brain Tumor, Glioblastoma Multiforme

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