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Genitourinary Surgical and Other Conditions News

Little Evidence That Vasectomy Raises Prostate Cancer Risk

Posted 18 Jul 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, July 18, 2017 – For men who have had or might undergo a vasectomy, there is good news: A major study finds scant evidence that the procedure raises their risk of prostate cancer. "At most, there is a trivial association between vasectomy and prostate cancer that is unlikely to be causal," concluded a team led by Dr. R. Jeffrey Karnes, of the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. The analysis, based on data from 53 studies on the subject, was published online July 17 in the journal JAMA Internal Medicine. As the researchers noted, couples who want to avoid unintended pregnancy often place the responsibility on the female partner. And sometimes, conception occurs despite the use of birth control pills or devices. In contrast, vasectomy has a very low risk of unintended pregnancy. And, "given the lower costs and lower risk of complications for vasectomy compared with [female] tubal ... Read more

Related support groups: Birth Control, Contraception, Prostate Cancer, Genitourinary Surgical and Other Conditions

'Observation' Best Option for Most Low-Risk Prostate Cancer

Posted 13 Jul 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, July 13, 2017 – Men with early stage prostate cancer who have surgery to remove their tumor do not live longer than those who receive no treatment at all, a long-running clinical trial has concluded. At the same time, nearly one in three men who had the surgery wound up with long-term complications, such as urinary incontinence and erectile dysfunction, said lead researcher Dr. Timothy Wilt. He is a clinical investigator with the Minneapolis Veterans Affairs Health Care System. Based on these findings, cancer experts should revise clinical guidelines so most men with low-risk prostate cancer receive no treatment, Wilt said. Instead, doctors should simply track the progress of their patient's slow-growing cancer by asking about signs and symptoms of disease progression. "Our results demonstrate that for the large majority of men with localized prostate cancer, selecting ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Prostate Cancer, Diagnosis and Investigation, Genitourinary Surgical and Other Conditions

Less Invasive Procedure May Treat Fibroids Without Harming Fertility

Posted 13 Jun 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, June 13, 2017 – A simple procedure may help women who are suffering from fibroids without jeopardizing their future fertility, a new study suggests. Uterine fibroid embolization (UFE) blocks blood flow to fibroids so they stop growing or shrink. But the technique hasn't been recommended for women who hope to conceive since it was unclear if blood flow might also be blocked to the uterus itself, the researchers explained. According to prior studies, fertility issues strike one of every four women with fibroids, which are benign, muscular tumors on the uterus. The standard treatment for these women is a myomectomy, or surgical removal of the fibroids. However, UFE is an easier, less invasive procedure, the researchers said. "[We chose to do this study] because of the concerns about the effect of UFE on fertility and the likelihood of pregnancy after the procedure," explained ... Read more

Related support groups: Female Infertility, Uterine Leiomyomata / Fibroids, Genitourinary Surgical and Other Conditions

Abused Women Prone to Unnecessary Ovary Removal: Study

Posted 8 Jun 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, June 8, 2017 – Women who are victims of abuse may be at increased risk for unnecessary ovary removal, a new study suggests. "Our current findings suggest that physical, emotional or sexual abuse predisposes women to seek medical attention for multiple gynecological symptoms, such as abdominal pain or excessive bleeding," said study co-author Dr. Liliana Gazzuola-Rocca. She is a health sciences researcher and psychiatrist at the Mayo Clinic, where the study was done. "These gynecological symptoms may lead the women and their gynecologists to opt for removal of the reproductive organs at a young age – even when these organs are completely normal," she said in a clinic news release. The researchers compared 128 women under age 46 in Minnesota who had had their ovaries removed with women who did not have the procedure. The ovaries were removed for reasons other than cancer or a ... Read more

Related support groups: Female Infertility, Genitourinary Surgical and Other Conditions

Less-Invasive Fibroid Treatment May Be 'Under-Used'

Posted 6 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, March 6, 2017 – A minimally invasive procedure for uterine fibroids may be "under-used" in U.S. hospitals, compared with surgery, a new study suggests. The study looked at a national sample of hospitals and found that fewer fibroid patients are undergoing hysterectomy – surgical removal of the uterus. But hysterectomy remains much more common compared with a less-invasive procedure called embolization. Fibroids are non-cancerous growths in the wall of the uterus that are usually harmless. But when they cause problems – such as persistent pain and heavy menstrual bleeding – treatment may be necessary. For women with severe symptoms, the go-to has traditionally been hysterectomy, or sometimes surgery to remove the fibroids only. There are other options, though. One is embolization, which involves injecting tiny particles into the small uterine arteries supplying the fibroids. ... Read more

Related support groups: Hysterectomy, Uterine Leiomyomata / Fibroids, Genitourinary Surgical and Other Conditions

Hormonal Drug Boosts Survival After Prostate Cancer's Return: Study

Posted 1 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 1, 2017 – When prostate cancer recurs after surgery, treatment with both radiation and a testosterone-suppressing drug can extend some men's lives, a new clinical trial finds. In a nearly 20-year study, researchers found that the combination therapy cut the risk of death from prostate cancer in half, compared to radiation alone. And that translated into better overall survival, the researchers reported in the Feb. 2 New England Journal of Medicine. After 12 years, just over 76 percent of men who'd received radiation and the hormonal drug bicalutamide (Casodex) were still alive. That compared with just over 71 percent of those who'd received radiation alone. Not all patients benefited from extra treatment, though – including those with "lower-risk" prostate cancer that, despite recurring, appeared less aggressive. And the testosterone-blocking drug carried expected side ... Read more

Related support groups: Prostate Cancer, Transurethral Prostatectomy, Casodex, Bicalutamide, History - Radiation Therapy, Genitourinary Surgical and Other Conditions

Anxiety May Lead to Unneeded Prostate Cancer Treatments

Posted 27 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Jan. 27, 2017 – Anxiety may prompt prostate cancer patients to opt for potentially unnecessary treatments, a new study suggests. The research included more than 1,500 men newly diagnosed with localized prostate cancer. They were more likely to choose surgery and radiation therapy than active surveillance. Active surveillance – also known as "watchful waiting" – is when the patient is monitored closely, but not treated. "Men's level of emotional distress shortly after diagnosis predicted greater likelihood of choosing surgery over active surveillance," said the researchers from the University at Buffalo and Roswell Park Cancer Institute in Buffalo, N.Y. "Importantly, this was true among men with low-risk disease, for whom active surveillance may be a clinically viable option and side effects of surgery might be avoided," they noted. Though the study found an association ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety, Anxiety and Stress, Erectile Dysfunction, Prostate Cancer, Urinary Incontinence, Genitourinary Surgical and Other Conditions

U.S. Deaths From Cervical Cancer May Be Underestimated

Posted 23 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Jan. 23, 2017 – The number of women who die from cervical cancer in the United States may be higher than previously believed, and the risk is greatest among older and black women, a new study finds. "This is a preventable disease and women should not be getting it, let alone dying from it," study leader Anne Rositch, an assistant professor of epidemiology at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, said in a Hopkins news release. Due to big advances in early detection, such as the Pap test, it's long been thought that cervical cancer had made a big retreat in the United States. But the researchers note that prior estimates of cervical cancer death had included women who'd already had a hysterectomy – which can include removal of the uterus and cervix. One in five women in the United States has had a hysterectomy, according to the researchers. Preventive screening such as the Pap ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Cancer, Hysterectomy, Cervical Cancer, Genitourinary Surgical and Other Conditions

Vasectomy May Not Raise Prostate Cancer Risk After All

Posted 19 Sep 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Sept. 19, 2016 – A large, new study challenges previous research that suggested vasectomies might increase the risk of prostate cancer or dying from it. In the latest finding, researchers found no connection between vasectomies and overall risk of prostate cancer, or of dying from the disease. The American Cancer Society epidemiologists reviewed more than 7,000 prostate cancer deaths, as opposed to the just over 800 prostate cancer deaths that were studied by Harvard scientists in a 2014 study. "Vasectomy is an effective and inexpensive long-term method of birth control," said new study author Eric Jacobs. "This new, large study provides some reassurance that vasectomy is unlikely to meaningfully increase risk of prostate cancer." Jacobs and his colleagues reviewed data on almost 364,000 men aged 40 and older who participated in the Cancer Prevention Study II, a vast research ... Read more

Related support groups: Birth Control, Contraception, Emergency Contraception, Prostate Cancer, Postcoital Contraception, Prostatitis, Genitourinary Surgical and Other Conditions, Prostate Tumor - Benign

Prostate Cancer Treatments: Different Choices for Different Men

Posted 15 Sep 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 14, 2016 – A large, decade-long study offers new insights into the treatment dilemmas that many men diagnosed with prostate cancer face: What to do next? The research finds that for certain men, death rates from prostate cancer were roughly the same over several years regardless of whether they chose to be monitored – called "watchful waiting" – or underwent radiation or had their prostate removed. But the findings don't prove that "watchful waiting" is always the best choice. Men who were otherwise largely healthy and chose to be monitored were twice as likely as the others to see their cancer spread over the 10-year study period. "The healthier you are and the longer your life expectancy, the more risk you're taking with surveillance," said Dr. Anthony D'Amico, a professor of radiation oncology at Harvard Medical School. He wrote a commentary accompanying the ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Prostate Cancer, History - Radiation Therapy, Genitourinary Surgical and Other Conditions

Use of Cancer-Linked Fibroid Device Declines After FDA Warning

Posted 23 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Aug. 23, 2016 – The use of power morcellators – cutting tools used in minimally invasive gynecological procedures – has dropped significantly for hysterectomies since the U.S. Food and Drug Administration warned against their use two years ago, a new study finds. Power morcellators have small blades that rotate rapidly. When used in minimally invasive hysterectomies or for the removal of noncancerous growths on the uterus known as fibroids, they slice the tissue into smaller pieces that are removed through a small opening in the abdomen. But tiny pieces of tissue can also spread to other areas of the body. And, sometimes, undetected cancers can be cut up with the healthy tissue. If that cancerous tissue isn't completely removed, those cells can cause cancer elsewhere. That's what prompted the FDA to issue its 2014 warning, the researchers explained. The new study looked only ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Cancer, Hysterectomy, Uterine Leiomyomata / Fibroids, Ovarian Cancer, Genitourinary Surgical and Other Conditions, Urinary Tract Cancer

1 in 5 Ovarian Cancer Patients Doesn't Get Life-Extending Surgery: Study

Posted 4 Jun 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, June 3, 2016 – Surgery may significantly extend ovarian cancer patients' lives, but one in five women does not have the procedure, a new study finds. "Though surgery isn't right for every patient, we suspect that some women do not receive beneficial surgical treatment because they have poor access to specialty care," said lead researcher Dr. David Shalowitz. He is a fellow in gynecologic oncology at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia. "While some women may benefit more from non-surgical treatment, the results of our study showed that on average, women who received surgery lived more than four years, compared to less than one year for those who received only non-surgical treatment," he said in a university news release. The researchers analyzed data from more than 210,000 women diagnosed with ovarian cancer in the United States ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Ovarian Cancer, Surgical Prophylaxis, Genitourinary Surgical and Other Conditions

FDA OKs 'Containment' Bag for Certain Uterine Surgeries

Posted 7 Apr 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, April 7, 2016 – The U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Thursday said it would permit limited use of a "tissue containment system" in conjunction with laparoscopic power morcellators – devices that grind up tissue in gynecological surgeries. But the FDA still warns against using laparoscopic power morcellators in most women because the procedure can spread undetected cancer cells. The device, called the PneumoLiner, will be permitted only when uterine tissue is not suspected to contain cancer, the agency said. And its maker must warn patients and doctors that the device has not been proven to reduce the risk of spreading cancer during these procedures. "The PneumoLiner is intended to contain morcellated tissue in the very limited patient population for whom power morcellation may be an appropriate therapeutic option – and only if patients have been appropriately informed ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Cancer, Abnormal Uterine Bleeding, Hysterectomy, Uterine Leiomyomata / Fibroids, Urinary Tract Cancer, Genitourinary Surgical and Other Conditions

Study Pinpoints Best Timing for Rectal Cancer Surgery

Posted 21 Jan 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Jan. 21, 2016 – Researchers say they've pinpointed the best length of time to wait to perform surgery for rectal cancer after chemotherapy and radiation treatment have been completed. The researchers examined outcomes among 11,760 U.S. patients with stage 2 or 3 localized rectal cancer who had combined chemotherapy and radiation therapy (chemoradiotherapy) and surgery between 2006 and 2012. Patients who had surgery precisely eight weeks (56 days) after they completed chemoradiotherapy had the best survival rates and successful removal of their tumors. Waiting any longer may increase the risk of tumor regrowth, the study found. The time between chemoradiotherapy and surgery ranged from 43 to 63 days in the study. Compared to those who had surgery within 55 days of chemoradiotherapy, those who had surgery after 56 days were slightly older (59 versus 58 years of age) and more ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Colonoscopy, Colorectal Cancer, Surgical Prophylaxis, Genitourinary Surgical and Other Conditions

FDA Tightens Rules for Using Mesh Implants in Women's Surgery

Posted 4 Jan 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Jan. 4, 2016 – The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has strengthened rules regarding the use of vaginal mesh implants to treat pelvic organ prolapse in women. The devices were reclassified on Monday from a "moderate" to "high" risk category. Manufacturers must now submit pre-market approval applications to the FDA to help the agency better assess the implants' safety and effectiveness. Pelvic organ prolapse involves a weakening or stretching of internal structures that support organs such as the bladder, bowel and uterus. It can happen in women after childbirth, a hysterectomy or menopause. It can cause pelvic pain, constipation and urinary leakage, and often affects sexual activity. Surgeons have long used the mesh implants to reinforce weakened pelvic floor muscles and repair pelvic organ prolapse. But, problems afterwards such as pain, infection, bleeding, urinary problems ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Pelvic Infections, Genitourinary Surgical and Other Conditions

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