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Related terms: Anxiety Disorder, GAD, General Anxiety Disorder

A Stressed Life May Mean a Wider Waistline

Posted 2 days 1 hour ago by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Feb. 23, 2017 – Days filled with stress and anxiety may be upping your risk of becoming overweight or obese, British researchers say. The researchers said they found a link between high levels of the stress hormone cortisol and excess weight. "We don't know which came first, the greater body weight or the higher cortisol," said researcher Andrew Steptoe. He's the British Heart Foundation professor of psychology at University College London. For the study, Steptoe's team analyzed levels of cortisol in a lock of hair about three-quarters of an inch long, cut as close as possible to the scalp. This hair sample reflected accumulated cortisol levels over the previous two months, the researchers said. Cortisol is the body's primary stress hormone, triggered when you have a "flight-or-fight" response to danger. It benefits you to escape danger, but if cortisol levels stay ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Anxiety and Stress, Obesity, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Social Anxiety Disorder, Weight Loss, Performance Anxiety

Heart Disease Linked to Anxiety, Negative Feelings

Posted 4 days ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Feb. 21, 2017 – People with mild heart disease are more likely to say they have poorer health, anxiety and a negative outlook than people in the general population, a new study suggests. These problems are more common among female patients than male patients, the research found. In mild heart disease, there is partial blockage of blood flow to the heart. People with the condition are more at risk of heart attacks, other serious heart problems, and death from any cause. The perception of overall physical and mental health, as well as personality, can have an impact on health outcomes, study senior author Paula Mommersteeg suggested. The study was published Feb. 21 in the journal Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes. "We were very intrigued by these sex and gender differences – we had not thought they would be so apparent," Mommersteeg said in a journal news ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Anxiety and Stress, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Social Anxiety Disorder, Heart Disease, Heart Attack, Angina, Myocardial Infarction, Ischemic Heart Disease, Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis

Staying Socially Active Nourishes the Aging Brain

Posted 5 days ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Feb. 20, 2017 – Socializing with lots of relatives and friends may help you stay mentally sharp as you age, a new report co-sponsored by AARP finds. "It's not uncommon for our social networks to shrink in size as we get older," said Marilyn Albert, professor of neurology and director of cognitive neuroscience at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore. "This report provides many helpful suggestions about the things we can do to improve the quality of our relationships with family and friends, which may be beneficial in maintaining our mental abilities," Albert said in an AARP news release. The report also discusses the social benefits of having pets, how age-friendly communities boost social ties, how close relationships benefit both physical and mental health, and how social media (including Facebook and Skype) helps older adults maintain social connections. The report is from ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Anxiety and Stress, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Social Anxiety Disorder, Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Performance Anxiety, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Lewy Body Dementia, Dementia with Depressive Features

Stress Busters For Work That Work

Posted 5 days ago by Drugs.com

-- According to an American Psychological Association Stress In America Survey, job stress is one of top causes of stress for American adults. Unfortunately, most of the methods that mental health experts recommend for managing stress – like exercise, meditation and yoga – just can't be done in most workplaces. So you need to have some alternative methods you can use on the fly, while your stress levels rise, and nobody knows your using them. Here are five methods for managing stress at work that all fit this description: Cognitive restructuring. Most people don't realize what a big role their own thinking plays in creating stress. When your boss asks you to work late on a Friday night and you say to yourself: That jerk is ALWAYS asking me to work late, this kind reaction greatly adds to your stress. Start to notice your inner dialogue and quickly learn to evaluate it. If it isn't ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Anxiety and Stress, Social Anxiety Disorder

Health Tip: Feeling Tense?

Posted 9 days ago by Drugs.com

-- If you're feeling tense and stressed, experts say there are things you can do to calm your nerves. The Helpguide.org website suggests: Hum or sing a song that helps you feel calm. Run your hands over an object that feels soothing. Breathe in an energizing scent. Sip on a warm mug of a beverage that helps you feel relaxed. Perform some relaxing slow stretches. Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Panic Disorder, Anxiety and Stress, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Social Anxiety Disorder, Performance Anxiety

Some Partners Need Extra Loving This Valentine's Day

Posted 11 days ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Feb. 14, 2017 – The best gift you can give a stressed or depressed partner this Valentine's Day is extra love and support, researchers say. They surveyed more than 1,400 couples on self-esteem, levels of depression and mutual support. The study revealed that when one partner was feeling stressed, support from their mate was associated with improved self-esteem and lower risk of depression in the future. "Efforts from a partner to help alleviate stress may prevent the development or worsening of mental health problems and, in fact, could help keep the relationship healthy," said lead researcher Matthew Johnson. He's an assistant professor at the University of Alberta's Faculty of Agricultural, Life and Environmental Sciences, in Edmonton, Canada. "When we experience stress, especially high levels of stress, we are particularly vulnerable and perhaps that's why partner support ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Anxiety and Stress, Lexapro, Zoloft, Cymbalta, Effexor, Prozac, Celexa, Major Depressive Disorder, Citalopram, Paxil, Sertraline, Pristiq, Social Anxiety Disorder, Amitriptyline, Venlafaxine, Fluoxetine, Effexor XR

Tiny Babies May Face Mental Health Problems Later

Posted 12 days ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Feb. 13, 2017 – Extremely low birth weight babies may be at increased risk for mental health problems later in life, a new review suggests. Researchers examined 41 studies conducted from 1990 to 2016. The studies included more than 2,700 extremely low birth weight babies (less than 1,000 grams, or just over 2 pounds) and more than 11,000 normal birth weight babies in the United States, Canada and 10 other countries. The extremely low birth weight babies had a higher risk for certain mental health problems. As children, they were more likely to have attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and as teens they had a greater risk of ADHD and social problems, the researchers found. Compared to adults who were born at a normal weight, those born at an extremely low weight had higher rates of anxiety, depression and shyness, and markedly lower levels of social functioning, ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Adderall, Anxiety and Stress, Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), Social Anxiety Disorder, Concerta, Ritalin, Adderall XR, Methylphenidate, Oppositional Defiant Disorder, Amphetamine, Autism, Delivery, Dysthymia, Psychiatric Disorders, Methylin, Daytrana, Amphetamine/Dextroamphetamine

Stress Buster

Posted 12 days ago by Drugs.com

-- The same system that activates the stress response in your body – the autonomic nervous system – also regulates other functions, including heart rate, blood pressure and breathing rate. But unlike most autonomic functions, which are hard or impossible to control, you can easily take control of your breathing. When you're stressed, your breathing tends to become quick and shallow. So reminding yourself to breathe slowly and deeply makes this the perfect tool for self-regulating your nervous system and lowering your levels of stress. Here are four breathing exercises you can learn and do in just minutes: 1. Abdominal breathing. Put one hand over your belly. When you breathe air in right down to the abdomen, you'll notice your hand rise on the in-breath and fall on the out-breath. You can even gently push down on your belly on the out-breath, forcing the last bit of air out of your ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Panic Disorder, Anxiety and Stress, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Social Anxiety Disorder, Performance Anxiety, Agoraphobia, Avoidant Personality Disorder

Better Sleep Could Mean Better Sex for Older Women

Posted 1 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 1, 2017 – A more satisfying sex life may be only a good night's sleep away for women over 50, new research finds. Researchers led by Dr. Juliana Kling of the Mayo Clinic in Scottsdale, Ariz., tracked data from nearly 94,000 women aged 50 to 79. The investigators found that 31 percent had insomnia, and a little more than half (56 percent) said they were somewhat or very satisfied with their sex life. But too little sleep – fewer than seven to eight hours a night – was linked with a lower likelihood of sexual satisfaction, the findings showed. "This is a very important study since it examines a question which has tremendous potential impact on women's lives," said Dr. Jill Rabin, who reviewed the findings. She's co-chief of the Women's Health Program at Northwell Health in New Hyde Park, N.Y. Age played a key role in outcomes. For example, the study found that older ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Xanax, Anxiety and Stress, Sleep Disorders, Klonopin, Insomnia, Clonazepam, Ativan, Fatigue, Valium, Lorazepam, Hot Flashes, Alprazolam, Restless Legs Syndrome, Diazepam, Menopausal Disorders, Temazepam, Sleep Apnea, Postmenopausal Symptoms

Chronic Bullying Can Show Up in Report Cards

Posted 30 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Jan. 30, 2017 – Chronic bullying can take a toll on kids' grades. That's the suggestion of researchers said they found that young children who are bullied for years, or teens who face increased bullying in high school, lack confidence in their academic abilities, get lower grades and dislike school more than their peers. "It's extremely disturbing how many children felt bullied at school," said lead researcher Gary Ladd, a psychology professor at Arizona State University. "For teachers and parents, it's important to know that victimization tends to decline as kids get older, but some children never stop suffering from bullying during their school years," he added. For the study, Ladd's team followed 383 boys and girls from kindergarten until high school. The team based its analysis on annual surveys completed by the students about their experiences, evaluations provided by the ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Anxiety and Stress, Social Anxiety Disorder, Agitation, Agitated State, Performance Anxiety

Stress-Busting Tips

Posted 30 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

-- Lying around your home watching TV isn't always the best way to unwind. Police dramas, the news – even sports programming – can be stress-inducing. Plus, it's a passive activity, and mildly addictive, and nowhere near as relaxing as many other options you can choose. Here are five ways to relax at home that are truly therapeutic: 1. Listen more than you talk. "Feel good" chemicals like dopamine and oxytocin are released in the brain when you really connect with another human being. And when you really listen, your blood pressure actually goes down, according to Dr. James Lynch, an expert in mind/body medicine and a retired professor of psychiatry at the University of Maryland. 2. Take three deep breaths. Dr. Herbert Benson, professor of mind/body medicine at Harvard Medical School and co-author of The Relaxation Response, says deep breathing is a great way to deactivate the stress ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Anxiety and Stress, Social Anxiety Disorder, Performance Anxiety, Oxytocin, Pitocin, Syntocinon

If You Can't Stay Off Social Media, Maybe It's in Your Genes

Posted 27 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Jan. 27, 2017 – How many hours you devote to social networking, gaming and other online media may depend on your genes, British researchers report. People differ significantly in their use of online media, and researchers are trying to determine why. This new study of twins gives DNA some of the credit. Researchers at King's College London analyzed online media use by more than 8,500 16-year-old identical and non-identical twins. Identical twins share 100 percent of their genes; non-identical twins share 50 percent of their genes. The researchers concluded that genes, or heritability, accounted for more than one-third of the differences in use of online entertainment, gaming and educational media. "Our findings contradict popular media effects theories, which typically view the media as an external entity that has some effect – either good or bad – on 'helpless' consumers," ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Anxiety and Stress, Social Anxiety Disorder, Psychiatric Disorders, Avoidant Personality Disorder

Amnesia Affecting Some Opioid Abusers

Posted 26 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Jan. 26, 2017 – Short-term memory loss may be yet another price of America's opioid addiction epidemic. Massachusetts health officials reported Thursday a cluster of 14 patients in that state who experienced problems remembering things just told to them. Doctors call this sudden-onset amnesia. The patients also had abnormal results on MRI brain scans. And researchers believe this might be the first sign of a new type of amnesia caused by drug use, likely opioids. "The best thing that could happen is that maybe this would be nothing," said report co-author Dr. Alfred DeMaria Jr., Massachusetts state epidemiologist. "But we are suspicious that something is going on possibly related to substance abuse that was not recognized before." From 2012 to 2016, 14 cases of people with the unusual neurological problem were identified from medical records. Thirteen of the 14 were either ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Xanax, Oxycodone, Anxiety and Stress, Percocet, OxyContin, Klonopin, Clonazepam, Opiate Dependence, Morphine, Ativan, Valium, Opiate Withdrawal, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Social Anxiety Disorder, Lorazepam, Alprazolam, Diazepam, Heroin

Docs: Kids to Suffer Under Trump's Tough Immigration Policies

Posted 26 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Jan. 26, 2017 – U.S. pediatricians are taking President Donald Trump to task after he issued executive orders Wednesday that – the doctors said – will make the country a much less welcoming place for immigrant children. Not only will refugee children be harmed by the new policies, but children of immigrants already living in the United States will become frightened for their family's safety, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP). "Children do not immigrate, they flee," AAP President Dr. Fernando Stein said in a statement. "They are coming to the U.S. seeking safe haven in our country, and they need our compassion and assistance. "Far too many children in this country already live in constant fear that their parents will be taken into custody or deported, and the message these children received [Wednesday] from the highest levels of our federal government ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Anxiety and Stress, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Social Anxiety Disorder, Agitation, Agitated State, Performance Anxiety

Screen Time May Not Be So Bad for Teens After All

Posted 20 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Jan. 20, 2017 – Teens who log hours of screen time every day – on video games, smartphones, computers, TV and the like – may not be doing themselves any harm, a new study suggests. A digital "sweet spot" of screen time might even benefit teens' well-being by allowing them to develop social connections and personal skills, according to the findings. "Moderate levels of daily screen time do not appear to be harmful," said lead researcher Andrew Przybylski. He is an experimental psychologist with the Oxford Internet Institute at the University of Oxford. "In fact, even excessive levels of screen time appear unlikely to have significant negative effect." However, several child health experts said they weren't ready to blindly embrace the new study's conclusions that too much screen time may not be too much of a good thing. The research included more than 120,000 teenagers in the ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Anxiety and Stress, Social Anxiety Disorder, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Diagnosis and Investigation

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