Skip to Content

Join the 'Generalized Anxiety Disorder' group to help and get support from people like you.

Generalized Anxiety Disorder News

Related terms: Anxiety Disorder, GAD, General Anxiety Disorder

Health Tip: Managing Daily Stress

Posted 11 hours ago by Drugs.com

-- Stress can add up to serious emotional and physical health problems. Learning to manage it can help you handle whatever comes your way. The American Academy of Family Physicians recommends: Trying not to spend time worrying about things that are out of your control. Finding ways to tackle small problems, giving you a better sense of control. Preparing for stressful events, such as a job interview. Viewing changes as challenges to embrace, rather than as threats. Finding ways to resolve problems with others. Leaning on friends, loved ones or counselors for support. Avoiding a cluttered schedule. Keeping your goals realistic. Exercising regularly, eating nutritious food and getting enough sleep. Blowing off steam with a hobby or sport you enjoy. Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Panic Disorder, Anxiety and Stress, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Social Anxiety Disorder, Performance Anxiety

How Much Video Gaming Is Too Much for Kids?

Posted 11 hours ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Sept. 27, 2016 – Playing video games might improve a child's motor skills, reaction time and even academic performance, but new research shows that too much gaming can be linked to social and behavioral problems. Spanish investigators found that any skill enhancements linked to gaming among those aged 7 to 11 started to max out after about eight hours of gaming a week. And those who played nine hours or more a week were more likely to have social and behavioral problems. The bottom-line: "One to nine hours per week seems to be safe, but playing more than nine hours – one hour on weekdays and two hours on weekend days – may be not recommended for children 7 to 11 years old," said study author Dr. Jesus Pujol. But the study "does not permit [us] to directly establish whether the observed effects are a cause or consequence of gaming," Pujol stressed. "That is, children with ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Anxiety and Stress, Sleep Disorders, Insomnia, Fatigue, Social Anxiety Disorder

Mouse Study Hints at Which Brain Cells Trigger Fear

Posted 18 days ago by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Sept. 9, 2016 – In experiments with mice, researchers say they have found cells in the brain that play a major role in triggering anxiety. These cells are in a part of the brain called the hypothalamus, the scientists said. To pinpoint these cells, the researchers blocked cells from getting the stress hormone called corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH). CRH is a hormone involved in the body's "fight-or-flight" response, the researchers explained. Much to the researchers surprise, when CRH was blocked in some cells, anxiety behaviors such as vigilance, fear and suspicion were reduced, said one of the study's authors, Rhong Zang. He's with the division of Endocrinology at Boston Children's Hospital. Without the influence of CRH in these cells, mice were able to do things they normally feared, such as walking on elevated gangplanks, exploring brightly lit areas and approaching ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Anxiety and Stress, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Social Anxiety Disorder, Performance Anxiety

Couples At Risk During 'Divorce Season'

Posted 21 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

SUNDAY, Aug. 21, 2016 – Are certain times of the year harder on a marriage? Maybe, suggests new research that found Americans are more likely to file for divorce after winter and summer holidays. And, that's true even though many couples view the holidays as a time when things might get better, the researchers said. "People tend to face the holidays with rising expectations, despite what disappointments they might have had in years past. They represent periods in the year when there's the anticipation or the opportunity for a new beginning, a new start, something different, a transition into a new period of life. It's like an optimism cycle, in a sense," researcher Julie Brines, an associate professor of sociology from the University of Washington, said in a university news release. "They're very symbolically charged moments in time for the culture," she added. However, holidays can be ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Anxiety and Stress, Social Anxiety Disorder

Study of Teen Brains Offers Clues to Timing of Mental Illness

Posted 27 Jul 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, July 27, 2016 – Changes that occur in teens' brains as they mature may help explain why the first signs of mental illness tend to appear during this time, researchers report. British researchers used MRI scans to compare the brain structures of nearly 300 participants who were aged 14 to 24. The scientists discovered that the brain's outer region (cortex) becomes thinner as teens get older. At the same time, they saw that levels of myelin increased within the cortex. That increase was seen in critical regions of the brain that act as connection points between other regions. Myelin is the sheath that covers nerve fibers and enables them to communicate efficiently. "During our teenage years, our brains continue to develop. When we're still children, these changes may be more dramatic, but in adolescence we see that the changes refine the detail," explained study first author ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Bipolar Disorder, Social Anxiety Disorder, Schizophrenia, Severe Mood Dysregulation, Diagnosis and Investigation, Dependent Personality Disorder, Head Imaging

Can Trauma Trigger Violent Crime in Mentally Ill?

Posted 14 Jul 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, July 13, 2016 – People with serious mental illness who are victims of violence or exposed to stressful events are more likely to engage in a violent crime in the week following the trauma, a new study contends. Stressful experiences also affect people without psychiatric disorders, but not to the same extent, the researchers said. Some stressful events – such as being violently victimized, injured in an accident, losing one's parents or self-harming – act as "triggers," said study co-author Dr. Seena Fazel. He is a professor of forensic psychiatry at the University of Oxford in England. Experiencing one of these events increases the risk of committing a violent criminal act within a week of the trigger, especially in people with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, Fazel said. People diagnosed with these conditions have higher rates of criminal convictions than the general ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Anxiety and Stress, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Social Anxiety Disorder, Schizophrenia, Paranoid Disorder, Schizoaffective Disorder, Agitation, Psychosis, Agitated State, Psychiatric Disorders, Drug Psychosis, Executive Function Disorder

Hovering Parents May Harm Kids

Posted 27 Jun 2016 by Drugs.com

SATURDAY, June 25, 2016 – Children with "intrusive" parents who push too hard for good grades may be more prone to become highly self-critical or anxious and depressed, a new study suggests. "When parents become intrusive in their children's lives, it may signal to the children that what they do is never good enough," said study leader Ryan Hong, an assistant professor in the department of psychology at the National University of Singapore. The five-year study of primary school students in Singapore found that those whose parents acted intrusively, had high expectations of academic performance or overreacted when the child made a mistake were at increased risk of being overly critical of themselves. The researchers also found that children who were highly self-critical had higher levels of anxiety or depression symptoms, although the study did not prove that parental pressure caused ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Anxiety and Stress, Major Depressive Disorder, Social Anxiety Disorder, Dysthymia, Seasonal Affective Disorder

'Love Hormone' Gene May Be Key to Social Life

Posted 21 Jun 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, June 21, 2016 – Lower activity of a specific gene may affect a person's social behavior, including the ability to form healthy relationships, researchers say. The OXT gene is involved in the production of oxytocin, a hormone linked with a large number of social behaviors in people. It's sometimes referred to as the "love hormone." The University of Georgia team assessed more than 120 people, conducting genetic tests and assessments of social skills, brain structure and brain function. The investigators found that those with lower activity of the OXT gene had a harder time recognizing emotional facial expressions and tended to be more anxious about their relationships with loved ones. These low-OXT people also had less activity in brain regions associated with social thinking. And they had less gray matter in an area of the brain important for face processing and social ... Read more

Related support groups: Birth Control, Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Contraception, Anxiety and Stress, Emergency Contraception, Social Anxiety Disorder, Postcoital Contraception, Oxytocin, Pitocin, Diagnosis and Investigation, Syntocinon

The Childhood Incidents That Increase Later Suicide Risk

Posted 13 Jun 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, June 13, 2016 – Adults who witnessed parental domestic violence in childhood are at increased risk for suicide attempts, a new study finds. "When domestic violence is chronic in a home, there is a risk of long-term negative outcomes for the children, even when the children themselves are not abused," said study lead author Esme Fuller-Thomson. She is a professor with the University of Toronto's Faculty of Social Work. The researchers examined data from more than 22,500 Canadian adults. They found that about 17 percent of those exposed to chronic parental domestic violence (more than 10 times before age 16) had attempted suicide, compared with roughly 2 percent of those not exposed to parental domestic violence. "We had expected that the association between chronic parental domestic violence and later suicide attempts would be explained by childhood sexual or physical abuse, or ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Anxiety and Stress, Opiate Dependence, Major Depressive Disorder, Social Anxiety Disorder, Drug Dependence, Dysthymia, Substance Abuse, Toxic Reactions Incl Drug and Substance Abuse

Health Tip: Take Steps to Stay Mentally Healthy

Posted 13 Jun 2016 by Drugs.com

-- Mental health is as important as physical health, so take steps to keep yourself well. The University of Michigan Health System advises: Regularly do things you enjoy. Create a support network of friends and family. When you need help, don't be afraid to ask for it. Volunteer in your community. Find healthy ways to deal with stress, and find ways to laugh more. Set realistic goals. Don't turn to drugs and alcohol. Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Anxiety and Stress, Opiate Dependence, Social Anxiety Disorder, Drug Dependence, Alcoholism, Hangover, Toxic Reactions Incl Drug and Substance Abuse, Acute Alcohol Intoxication

Are 'Workaholics' Prone to OCD, Anxiety?

Posted 10 Jun 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, June 10, 2016 – Some workaholics may be prone to mental health disorders, compared to folks with greater work-life balance, new research suggests. These disorders may include anxiety, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) and depression, the study authors said. The findings, based on a review of more than 15,000 Norwegians, suggest that "taking work to the extreme may be a sign of deeper psychiatric issues," said study lead author Cecilie Schou Andreassen. "Physicians should not take for granted that a seemingly successful workaholic doesn't have these disorders," said Schou Andreassen, a clinical psychologist with the University of Bergen, in Norway. The research doesn't delve into cause and effect, so it's not clear how mental health issues and overwork might be linked. Nor should hard workers be labeled as workaholics, although ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Panic Disorder, Anxiety and Stress, Obsessive Compulsive Disorder, Major Depressive Disorder, Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Social Anxiety Disorder, Dysthymia, Performance Anxiety

Women More Prone to Anxiety Than Men, Review Finds

Posted 6 Jun 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, June 6, 2016 – Struggling with anxiety? Then odds are you're a woman and you live in either North America or Western Europe. That's the conclusion of a new British study that found that women are twice as likely to suffer from anxiety as men. Moreover, people in North America and Western Europe are more prone to anxiety disorders than those from other parts of the world. In North America, nearly eight of 100 people suffer from anxiety – the most in the world. In East Asia, it's fewer than three in 100 – the lowest, the review authors noted. "Anxiety is important and shouldn't be overlooked," said lead researcher Olivia Remes, who's with the department of public health and primary care at the University of Cambridge's Strangeways Research Laboratory. "Sometimes people think that anxiety is just a part of their personality or that there's nothing they can do about it, but there ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Panic Disorder, Anxiety and Stress, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Social Anxiety Disorder, Performance Anxiety, Agoraphobia, Avoidant Personality Disorder

'Fat Shaming' Begins in First Grade

Posted 25 May 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, May 25, 2016 – As early as first grade, severely obese children are getting teased, picked on and bullied more than normal-weight kids, a new study finds. The new research also found that these severely obese youngsters are more likely to be depressed and withdrawn. Obese children may turn to eating to cope with the pain of rejection or skip school to avoid being bullied, the researchers said. "The social climate at school can exacerbate weight and learning problems because it is so unpleasant," said lead researcher Amanda Harrist, a professor of child development at Oklahoma State University in Stillwater. For many obese kids, home may not be much better, she said. Other studies have shown that obese children often have families that don't handle their emotions well and make fun of their kids' feelings, Harrist said. "At school, these kids are teased and picked on, and ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Anxiety and Stress, Obesity, Major Depressive Disorder, Social Anxiety Disorder, Weight Loss, Dysthymia

Antidepressants Not Just for Depression Any More

Posted 24 May 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, May 24, 2016 – Doctors prescribe antidepressants for a wide range of medical problems other than depression, apparently fueling the boom in sales of these medications, researchers report. Depression accounts for only a little more than half the antidepressant prescriptions issued by Quebec physicians during the past decade, the Canadian study found. Doctors also issued antidepressants to treat anxiety, insomnia, chronic pain, panic disorders, fibromyalgia, migraine, obsessive-compulsive disorders, and a host of other "off-label" conditions for which the drugs are not approved, according to the report. Two out of every three non-depression prescriptions for antidepressants were handed out under an off-label purpose, the findings showed. "The thing that's of concern here is that when prescribing for conditions other than depression, often these are for indications such as ... Read more

Related support groups: Pain, Depression, Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Headache, Panic Disorder, Anxiety and Stress, Lexapro, Fibromyalgia, Zoloft, Sleep Disorders, Cymbalta, Wellbutrin, Migraine, Insomnia, Effexor, Prozac, Celexa, Citalopram, Paxil

Pain, Epilepsy Drug Lyrica May Increase Birth Defects Risk, Study Suggests

Posted 18 May 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, May 18, 2016 – The widely prescribed drug pregabalin (Lyrica) may slightly increase the risk for birth defects, a new study suggests. In a small study, researchers found that among women taking Lyrica during the first trimester of pregnancy, 6 percent had infants with major birth defects. In women who weren't taking the drug, 2 percent had a baby with a major birth defect, the study found. "These results should be taken with caution," said study senior author Dr. Thierry Buclin, from the Swiss Teratogen Information Service and the division of clinical pharmacology at the Lausanne University Hospital, in Switzerland. "It's a warning, but it cannot be taken as a certainty." Lyrica is prescribed for a range of health problems, including epilepsy, fibromyalgia and anxiety. The new study findings should be investigated further, Buclin said. "We should not unduly alarm ... Read more

Related support groups: Birth Control, Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Contraception, Anxiety and Stress, Fibromyalgia, Seizures, Lyrica, Social Anxiety Disorder, Epilepsy, Pregabalin, Delivery, Performance Anxiety, Hydrocephalus, Premature Labor, Brain Anomalies incl Congenital, Labor Pain, Cesarean Section, Apnea of Prematurity, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Next

Ask a Question

Further Information

Related Condition Support Groups

Anxiety

Related Drug Support Groups

Lexapro, Cymbalta, citalopram, Paxil, sertraline, venlafaxine, Effexor XR, escitalopram, quetiapine, view more... paroxetine, pregabalin, duloxetine, Paxil CR, Pexeva, Irenka