Skip to Content

Join the 'Generalized Anxiety Disorder' group to help and get support from people like you.

Generalized Anxiety Disorder News

Related terms: Anxiety Disorder, GAD, General Anxiety Disorder

Poverty's Impact on a Child's Mental Health

Posted 8 days ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Jan. 9, 2017 – Growing up in poverty exposes children to greater levels of stress, which can lead to psychological problems later in life, a new study suggests. Researchers at Cornell University reported that kids who grow up poor are more likely to have reduced short-term spatial memory. The study also reported that such kids seem to be more prone to antisocial and aggressive behavior, such as bullying. Poor children are also more likely than kids from middle-income homes to feel powerless, the study authors suggested. Of course, the findings don't mean that all children growing up in poverty will have these problems, only that the risk is higher, the researchers said. "What this means is, if you're born poor, you're on a trajectory to have more of these kinds of psychological problems," study author Gary Evans, a professor of environmental and developmental psychology, said ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Bipolar Disorder, Anxiety and Stress, Major Depressive Disorder, Agitation, Agitated State, Psychiatric Disorders, Depressive Psychosis

Sleep May Help People Process Traumatic Events

Posted 15 days ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Jan. 2, 2017 – Sleeping soon after a traumatic event can help some people cope, a new Swiss study suggests. Two groups of volunteers were shown a video with traumatic images. One group slept for the night after seeing the video. The other group stayed awake. Participants recorded their memories of the images for several days. "Our results reveal that people who slept after the film had fewer and less distressing recurring emotional memories than those who were awake," said study author Birgit Kleim. She is a clinical psychological scientist in the department of psychiatry, psychotherapy and psychosomatics at the University of Zurich. "This supports the assumption that sleep may have a protective effect in the aftermath of traumatic experiences," she added in a university news release. Sleep can help weaken emotions linked with memories, such as fear caused by a traumatic event. ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Anxiety and Stress, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder

'Emotional Hangover' Is Real and Affects Future Experiences: Study

Posted 26 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Dec. 26, 2016 – Experiences that tug at our feelings create emotional "hangovers" that affect future events and make them easier to remember. "How we remember events is not just a consequence of the external world we experience, but is also strongly influenced by our internal states. And these internal states can persist and color future experiences," said study senior author Lila Davachi. She is an associate professor at New York University's Department of Psychology and Center for Neural Science. For the study, researchers assigned participants to look at a series of images. One group was first shown images that aroused emotion, and then neutral ones. The other group looked first at neutral images, then at the emotional ones. Six hours later, the participants were tested to see how well they recalled what they had seen. People who were exposed first to images that provoked ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Anxiety and Stress, Mild Cognitive Impairment

Women Chasing Holiday Perfection May Miss Signs of Heart Trouble

Posted 23 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Dec. 23, 2016 – Holiday pressure can stress anybody out, but some women get so anxious about making everything perfect that they miss the signs of serious heart problems. One of those threats is a so-called "silent heart attack." "Most of the time people who are experiencing a heart attack will have pain in the chest, shortness of breath, etc. Silent heart attack symptoms might be as simple as indigestion, flu-like symptoms, or feeling discomfort like a pulled muscle in the chest or back," said Dr. Karla Kurrelmeyer, a cardiologist at Houston Methodist DeBakey Heart & Vascular Center. It's important to have these symptoms checked as soon as possible to avoid scarring or damage to the heart, she said in a hospital news release. Another condition, known as stress-induced cardiomyopathy, can strike women when they're under great stress and hit with a traumatic life event like the ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Panic Disorder, Anxiety and Stress, Heart Disease, Heart Attack, Myocardial Infarction, Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis, Post MI Syndrome

The Impact of Child Abuse Can Last a Lifetime

Posted 19 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Dec. 19, 2016 – The traumatic effects of child abuse and neglect can persist for decades, often with substantial economic consequences, researchers report. "We found associations of child neglect and abuse with adult socioeconomic circumstances at age 50," said lead author Snehal Pinto Pereira. Physical, social or emotional abuse in childhood was linked at midlife to a greater risk of time off from work due to long-term sickness, said Pereira, a research associate at University College London's Institute of Child Health. Mistreatment in childhood also lowered the odds of owning a home, she said. "The associations for child neglect were linked to their poor reading and mathematics skills in adolescence, which in turn could hamper their ability to find work and progress in the job market," she explained. The research is only observational and doesn't establish a direct ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Anxiety and Stress, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Social Anxiety Disorder

For People With Mental Health Woes, Pets Can Be Invaluable

Posted 9 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Dec. 9, 2016 – Cats, dogs, birds and other pets can help people manage their mental disorders, a new study says. Researchers from the United Kingdom asked more than 50 adults with long-term mental conditions about the role pets play in their social networks. Sixty percent placed pets in the central and most important circle – above family, friends and hobbies. Another 20 percent placed pets in the second circle. Many said the constant presence and close proximity of their pets provide an immediate source of calm. For some, a pet helps distract them from symptoms and upsetting experiences such as hearing voices or suicidal thoughts. "You just want to sink into a pit... the cats force me to sort of still be involved with the world," one patient said. Another patient said: "I'm not thinking of the voices, I'm just thinking of the birds singing." The findings were published Dec. 8 ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Bipolar Disorder, Panic Disorder, Anxiety and Stress, Obsessive Compulsive Disorder, Major Depressive Disorder, Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Social Anxiety Disorder, Schizophrenia, Mania, Paranoid Disorder, Borderline Personality Disorder, Schizoaffective Disorder, Postpartum Depression, Autism, Psychosis, Eating Disorder

Optimism May Propel Women to a Longer Life

Posted 8 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 7, 2016 – Women who generally believe that good things will happen may live longer. That's the suggestion of a new study that seems to affirm the power of positive thinking. "This study shows that optimism is associated with reduced risk of death from stroke, respiratory disease, infection and cancer," said Eric Kim, co-lead author of the investigation. "Optimistic people tend to act in healthier ways. Studies show that optimistic people exercise more, eat healthier diets and have higher quality sleep," said Kim, a research fellow in the department of social and behavioral sciences at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health in Boston. Kim added that an upbeat outlook also may directly affect biological function. Research has demonstrated that higher optimism is linked with lower inflammation, healthier lipid levels (fats in the blood), and higher antioxidants ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Anxiety and Stress

Medical School Can Be an Emotional Pressure-Cooker

Posted 6 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Dec. 6, 2016 – Many medical students from around the world struggle with depression, and more than 1 in 10 have suicidal thoughts, researchers report. And only about 16 percent of the students who tested positive for depression sought treatment, they added. The researchers analyzed nearly 200 studies that included a total of 129,000 medical students in 47 countries. They found that the rate of depression or depressive symptoms was 27 percent. The researchers also found that 11 percent of the students reported thoughts of suicide. The findings were published in the Dec. 6 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association. Reliable estimates of depression and thoughts of suicide among medical students are key for efforts to prevent, treat and identify causes of emotional distress in the students, according to study leader Dr. Douglas Mata, of Brigham and Women's Hospital ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Anxiety and Stress, Major Depressive Disorder, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Social Anxiety Disorder, Postpartum Depression, Performance Anxiety

Sexism Could Harm Men's Health: Study

Posted 21 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Nov. 21, 2016 – Men who have "playboy" attitudes and believe in power over women may face a higher risk for mental health trouble than men who don't, a broad new research review suggests. The finding on sexism, and other so-called "traditional views" on masculinity, stems from an analysis of 74 studies conducted between 2003 and 2013. The studies included nearly 19,500 predominantly white male participants, the researchers said. The research "looked at expectations about what it means to be masculine, and how that relates to mental health outcomes among men," explained study lead author Y. Joel Wong. "What we found overall is that the more that men conformed to masculine norms the poorer their mental health, and the less likely they were to seek mental health services," he said. Wong is associate professor of counseling and educational psychology at Indiana University ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Anxiety and Stress, Major Depressive Disorder, Social Anxiety Disorder, Psychiatric Disorders, Aggressive Behavior

Can a Community's 'Well-Being' Help You Live Longer?

Posted 10 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Nov. 10, 2016 – The level of "well-being" in a community – including people's emotional health and life satisfaction – may help explain some of the disparities in life expectancy across the United States, a new study finds. It's known that Americans' life expectancy can vary hugely depending on where they live. A 2013 study, for example, found that a male born in Fairfax County, Va., could expect to live almost 18 years longer than his counterpart born in McDowell County, W.Va. Differences in demographics, including income, education and race, only partly explain the disparities. The new study, published in the journal Health Affairs, looked at how the "well-being" of a county fits into the picture. Well-being included the general physical health of a county's population. But it also measured people's levels of emotional health, life satisfaction, optimism and security – ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Anxiety and Stress, Obesity, Social Anxiety Disorder

Could Loneliness Be an Early Sign of Alzheimer's?

Posted 2 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 2, 2016 – Subtle feelings of loneliness might warn of impending Alzheimer's disease in older folks, a new study suggests. Healthy seniors with elevated brain levels of amyloid – a type of protein fragment associated with Alzheimer's disease – seem more likely to feel lonely than people with lower levels of amyloid, researchers found. "For people who have high levels of amyloid – the people truly at high risk for Alzheimer's – they were 7.5 times more likely to be lonely than non-lonely," said lead researcher Dr. Nancy Donovan. She's director of the Center for Alzheimer Research and Treatment at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston. Studies have long shown that people who remain socially active are less likely to develop dementia, Donovan said. But the results of the new study suggest that that relationship may work the other way around, as well – that people in ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Anxiety and Stress, Social Anxiety Disorder, Alzheimer's Disease, Diagnosis and Investigation, Avoidant Personality Disorder

High Rate of Antidepressant Use After Cancer

Posted 27 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 26, 2016 – Treatment for depression and anxiety is nearly twice as common among U.S. cancer survivors as it is for those who never had the disease, a new study finds. Among more than 3,000 adult cancer survivors, 19 percent reported taking medication for anxiety, depression or both, researchers found. But when the research team looked at nearly 45,000 adults with no history of cancer, they found just one in 10 used these medications. "Overall, these findings are sobering," said lead researcher Nikki Hawkins, a behavioral scientist at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. "We've come a long way in treating cancer medically, but these data tell us cancer can take a serious psychological and emotional toll for many years, even after treatment is complete," she said. Hawkins said it's remarkable that nearly one in five cancer survivors is taking medications ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Anxiety and Stress, Cancer, Major Depressive Disorder, Social Anxiety Disorder, Breast Cancer, Prostate Cancer, Colorectal Cancer, Dysthymia, Melanoma, Breast Cancer - Adjuvant, Cervical Cancer

Can Teens' Heart Rate, Blood Pressure Show Ties to Mental Ills?

Posted 26 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 26, 2016 – A young man's future risk of mental disorders could be tied to higher-than-average heart rate or blood pressure in his late teens, a new European study suggests. Young men with a resting heart rate and blood pressure that's elevated – but still within normal range – seem more likely to develop a wide range of mental illnesses later in their lives, researchers found. These include an increased risk of obsessive-compulsive disorder, schizophrenia and anxiety disorders, the results show. "We are coming to appreciate that psychiatric illnesses are brain diseases, and our central nervous system, which is mediated from our brain, controls autonomic functions," like heart rate and blood pressure, said Dr. Victor Fornari. He is director of the division of child and adolescent psychiatry at Zucker Hillside Hospital in Glen Oaks, N.Y. "We should recognize it would ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Bipolar Disorder, High Blood Pressure, Anxiety and Stress, Obsessive Compulsive Disorder, Hypertension, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Social Anxiety Disorder, Schizophrenia, Borderline Personality Disorder, Psychosis, Psychiatric Disorders, Hypertensive Emergency, Hypertensive Retinopathy, Hypertensive Heart Disease

Surfing Through Selfies Tied to Low Self-Esteem?

Posted 25 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Oct. 25, 2016 – Almost everyone has looked at selfies posted on social media where the people in the photo look deliriously happy and wildly popular. But a new study suggests that some are doing it so much that it may lower their self-esteem. Penn State researchers conducted an online survey to assess how online viewing of selfies and groupies affected people's mental health. The more often people viewed their own or other people's selfies, the lower their self-esteem and life satisfaction was, the investigators found. "People usually post selfies when they're happy or having fun. This makes it easy for someone else to look at these pictures and think his or her life is not as great as theirs," study co-author Ruoxu Wang, a graduate student in mass communications, said in a university news release. But the study also found that viewing selfies and groupies on social media ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Anxiety and Stress, Social Anxiety Disorder

How to Help a Child Who's Cyberbullied

Posted 17 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Oct. 17, 2016 – About 25 percent of American children and teens experience cyberbullying, but there are ways parents can help their children, a criminology and bullying expert says. Cyberbullying is intentional harassment, humiliation or any other form of abuse through use of computers, cellphones or other electronic devices. When a child is bullied online, parents must make sure the youngster feels safe, said Sameer Hinduja, a professor at Florida Atlantic University's School of Criminology and Criminal Justice in Boca Raton. Talk with and listen to your child to learn exactly what happened. Don't panic, but also don't minimize the situation or make excuses for the cyberbullying, Hinduja said in a university news release. Collect as much evidence as possible. That might mean printing out or creating screenshots of conversations, messages, pictures and any other items that show ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Anxiety and Stress, Social Anxiety Disorder

Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Next

Ask a Question

Further Information

Related Condition Support Groups

Anxiety

Related Drug Support Groups

Lexapro, Cymbalta, citalopram, Paxil, sertraline, venlafaxine, Effexor XR, escitalopram, quetiapine, view more... paroxetine, pregabalin, duloxetine, Paxil CR, Pexeva, Irenka