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Gastrointestinal Surgery News

One Weight-Loss Surgery Shows Lasting Results

Posted 21 Sep 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 20, 2017 – Obesity surgery can have long-lasting effects on weight and the risk of developing type 2 diabetes and high blood pressure, a new study finds. Doctors have known that a type of obesity surgery, called gastric bypass, works in the short-term. Patients typically lose a lot of weight, and obesity-related health problems can be prevented or even cured. But the new findings show that the benefits are still apparent 12 years later. The study, of more than 1,100 severely obese adults, found that those who underwent gastric bypass lost an average of 100 pounds over two years. By year 12, they'd managed to keep 77 of those pounds off. On top of the weight loss, surgery patients had a much lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes – 92 percent lower, versus obese patients who did not have surgery. "This is very effective at diabetes prevention," said lead researcher ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Weight Loss, Gastrointestinal Surgery

Weight-Loss Surgery May Leave Some Anemic

Posted 20 Sep 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 20, 2017 – For many obese Americans, weight-loss surgery can be a path to losing lots of unhealthy pounds. But new research suggests it can also lead to a long-term loss of healthy red blood cells, otherwise known as anemia. In a study of U.S. veterans who got a common form of weight-loss (bariatric) surgery, "anemia rates are high 10 years after," conclude a team led by Dr. Dan Eisenberg, a bariatric surgeon at Stanford School of Medicine. One specialist who reviewed the findings wasn't surprised. "Anemia is a common problem in patients who have undergone gastric bypass, and this study sheds light on the severity of the problem in patients who don't receive adequate treatment," said Dr. Allison Barrett. She directs bariatric surgery at Long Island Jewish Forest Hill, in Forest Hill, N.Y. She believes the research "proves that complications of surgery, such as vitamin ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Weight Loss, Anemia, Iron Deficiency Anemia, Gastric Bypass Surgery, Gastrointestinal Surgery

Don't Put Off Weight-Loss Surgery Till You're Heavier

Posted 26 Jul 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, July 26, 2017 – Having weight-loss surgery before you become severely obese tends to achieve better results, a new study finds. Researchers found that people who underwent bariatric surgery when their body mass index (BMI) was less than 40 were more likely to achieve a BMI below 30 (overweight but not obese) compared to those with a higher body mass index, researchers. A BMI of 30 or more is considered obese. For example, a 5-foot-5 woman weighing around 180 pounds has a BMI of 30. A BMI of over 40 (for example, the same woman weighing 240 pounds or more) is extremely obese. "Bariatric surgery is extremely safe and effective and should be considered as first-line therapy for patients with a BMI between 35 and 40," said lead researcher Dr. Oliver Varban. He's director of bariatric surgery of the University of Michigan Health Systems. "Waiting to reach a BMI of 50 or more only ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Weight Loss, Xenical, Orlistat, Alli, Gastric Bypass Surgery, Gastrointestinal Surgery

1 in 5 Weight-Loss Surgery Patients Using Opioids Years Later

Posted 6 Jun 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, June 6, 2017 – About 20 percent of U.S. weight-loss surgery patients are still using prescription opioid painkillers seven years later, a new study finds. The finding has importance, given the epidemic of opioid painkiller abuse currently affecting the United States, researchers said. "Our study does not prove that bariatric surgery causes an increase in opioid use. However, it does demonstrate the widespread use of opioids among post-surgical patients, thereby highlighting the need for alternative pain management approaches," said study co-author Dr. Anita Courcoulas. She is chief of minimally invasive bariatric and general surgery at the Unversity of Pittsburgh Medical Center. The researchers followed more than 2,000 patients nationwide. Before surgery, 14.7 percent said they regularly used a prescription opioid. Six months after surgery, the rate fell to about 13 percent, ... Read more

Related support groups: Oxycodone, Obesity, Tramadol, Hydrocodone, Methadone, OxyContin, Fentanyl, Morphine, Codeine, Opana, Weight Loss, Subutex, Dilaudid, Opana ER, MS Contin, Roxicodone, Butrans, Ultram, Hydromorphone, Nucynta

Gut Bacteria Changes After Some Weight-Loss Surgeries

Posted 26 May 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, May 26, 2017 – A type of weight-loss surgery – called Roux-en-Y gastric bypass – triggers major changes in the microbial population of the digestive tract, a new study finds. Specifically, the procedure leads to increased diversity of bacteria in the gut, and a microbial population distinct from obese and normal-weight people, researchers found. "Diversity is good," said study co-author Rosa Krajmalnik-Brown of Arizona State University. She and her colleagues said the findings may prove important in the understanding and management of obesity. "One of the key findings of the paper confirms what we had already observed in earlier research," said Krajmalnik-Brown. Compared to gastric banding – another type of weight-loss surgery – Roux-en-Y gastric bypass "had a huge effect on the microbial community structure," she said in a university news release. Obesity, which affects ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Obesity, Weight Loss, Gastric Bypass Surgery, Gastrointestinal Surgery

Weight-Loss Surgery May Help Obese Patients Beat Diabetes

Posted 16 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 15, 2017 – There's more evidence that obese patients with type 2 diabetes can control the disease better with weight-loss surgery, compared to medication alone. New research shows that five years after weight-loss surgery, known as bariatric surgery, those who had the procedure showed better improvements in quality of life and overall health, and some no longer needed insulin, compared with those who only took diabetes medications. "About a third of the patients who had surgery were able to achieve a complete remission of their diabetes – their blood sugar returned to normal and they did not need medications," said lead researcher Dr. Philip Schauer. He is director of the Cleveland Clinic Bariatric and Metabolic Institute in Ohio. "Surgery has come as close as any treatment that we know of that can lead to long-term remission of type 2 diabetes, which is about as close ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Diabetes, Type 2, Xenical, Orlistat, Alli, Gastric Bypass Surgery, Gastrointestinal Surgery

Rude, Disrespectful Surgeons May Also Be More Error-Prone: Study

Posted 15 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 15, 2017 – Surgeons with a history of patient complaints regarding their personalities or attitude are also more likely to make mistakes in the operating room, a new study finds. Researchers compared surgical outcomes with patient reports of unprofessional behavior by their doctors at several health systems in the United States. The investigators found that people treated by surgeons who had the most complaints had nearly 14 percent more complications in the month after surgery than patients treated by surgeons viewed as more respectful. Complications included surgical-site infections, pneumonia, kidney conditions, stroke, heart problems, blood clots, sepsis and urinary tract infections, according to the study led by Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC) researchers. Lead author Dr. William Cooper said surgeons who are rude and disrespectful to patients might also ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Surgery, Orthopedic Surgery, Surgical Prophylaxis, Gastrointestinal Surgery

FDA Issues Warning About Balloon Obesity Treatments

Posted 13 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Feb. 13, 2017 – Fluid-filled balloons placed in the stomach to treat obesity have been linked to serious complications, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration reports. The balloons treat obesity by taking up space in a patient's stomach, and are used in conjunction with diet and exercise. Two types of fluid-filled balloon systems – the ReShape Integrated Dual Balloon System and the Orbera Intragastric Balloon System – were approved by the FDA in 2015. But in a recent warning sent to health care providers, the FDA said it has received multiple reports of complications associated with the two balloon systems. One type of problem involved the balloons over-inflating with air or with more fluid in patients' stomachs. This led to the premature removal of the balloons. The second type of problem is development of acute pancreatitis. This complication also led to the removal of the ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Weight Loss, Xenical, Pancreatitis, Chronic Pancreatitis, Gastric Bypass Surgery, Gastrointestinal Surgery

Emergency Surgery Riskier for Kids in Poorer Countries

Posted 13 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Dec. 13, 2016 – Children in poorer countries are much more likely to die after emergency abdominal surgery than those in wealthy nations, a new study finds. Researchers analyzed the outcomes of more than 1,400 children in 43 countries who had emergency abdominal surgery in 2014. The surgeries were for conditions such as appendicitis, congenital abnormalities and hernia. Compared to children in wealthy countries, those in middle-income nations were four times more likely to die within 30 days of surgery, and those in poor countries were seven times more likely to die, the study found. Rates of serious complications were just over 11 percent among children in poor countries, compared with just over 6 percent for those in middle-income and rich countries. Rates of wound infection were 21 percent for children in poor countries, 9.6 percent for those in middle-income countries, and ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Appendectomy, Surgical Prophylaxis, Vascular Surgery, Gastrointestinal Surgery

Weight-Loss Surgery Tied to Lower Heart Risks

Posted 14 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Nov. 14, 2016 – Weight-loss surgery may significantly reduce obese people's risk of heart failure, a new study indicates. Researchers compared more than 25,800 obese people who had weight-loss (bariatric) surgery with more than 13,700 obese people who tried to lose weight through a program of major lifestyle changes. Both groups had no history of heart failure. Four years after the start of treatment, the weight-loss surgery group had lost more weight, had a nearly 50 percent lower risk of heart failure, and had lower rates of heart rhythm problems, diabetes and high blood pressure than the lifestyle-changes group, the findings showed. Both groups had similar rates of heart attack and death, according to the study, which was scheduled for presentation Monday at the American Heart Association (AHA) annual meeting, in New Orleans. "Our study shows an association between obesity ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Obesity, Diabetes, Type 2, Hypertension, Weight Loss, Heart Disease, Insulin Resistance, Pre-Diabetes, Gastric Bypass Surgery, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Diabetes Mellitus, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Ischemic Heart Disease, Gastrointestinal Surgery, Abnormal Glucose Tolerance, Hypertensive Heart Disease

Follow-Up Appointments Boost Weight-Loss Surgery Success

Posted 6 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

SATURDAY, Nov. 5, 2016 – Regular follow-up visits with a doctor translated into greater health improvements for weight-loss surgery patients, new research indicates. "This study shows there is great value in seeing patients at routine intervals after surgery in terms of health outcomes," said study co-author Dr. Andrea Schwoerer. She was at the Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University at the time of the study. "Unfortunately, many patients, reportedly as many as 50 percent, are lost to follow-up and therefore may not benefit as much as they can from weight-loss surgery, no matter how well it was performed," she added. In the study, the researchers compared outcomes for more than 51,000 patients. Some had three follow-up visits. These visits occurred at 3, 6 and 12 months after the weight-loss surgery (complete follow-up). Others had only one or two follow-up visits ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Weight Loss, Gastric Bypass Surgery, Gastrointestinal Surgery

Robotic Surgical Tools Tough to Keep Clean

Posted 1 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Nov. 1, 2016 – Even with repeated cleanings, it's virtually impossible to remove all contamination from robotic surgical instruments, a new study suggests. "One of the top priorities for hospitals is to treat patients safely and with minimal risk of infection," said study author Yuhei Saito, an assistant professor at the University of Tokyo Hospital in Japan. "Our results show that surgical instruments could be placing patients at risk due to current cleaning procedures. One way to address this issue is to establish new standards for cleaning surgical instruments, including multi-part robotic tools," Saito said in a news release from the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. Over the course of 21 months, the researchers assessed protein residue on 132 robotic and standard surgical instruments that were cleaned according to manufacturers' instructions. The cleanings ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Surgery, Bacterial Infection, Hepatitis C, Hepatitis B, Hepatitis A, Surgical Prophylaxis, Gastrointestinal Surgery, Cardiothoracic Surgery

Weight-Loss Surgery May Lower Risk of Pregnancy Complications

Posted 28 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Oct. 28, 2016 – Women who undergo weight-loss surgery gain major benefits when it comes to pregnancy, a new study suggests. Researchers found these women appear to be less likely to need a cesarean-section delivery and more likely to have a normal-sized baby. "These findings are important because we were able to confirm that obese women who undergo bariatric [weight-loss] operations prior to conceiving do not have worse outcomes, compared with obese women who don't have these procedures," said senior study author Dr. Aliu Sanni. He is medical director of the department of metabolic and bariatric surgery at Eastside Medical Center in Snellville, Ga. "We want to make sure that bariatric surgery performed before pregnancy will have benefits for these women, and that having a procedure won't harm the baby," he said in a news release from the American College of Surgeons. It's well ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Weight Loss, Delivery, Gastric Bypass Surgery, Premature Labor, Cesarean Section, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation, Gastrointestinal Surgery

Having Baby Too Soon After Weight-Loss Surgery May Raise Risks

Posted 19 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 20, 2016 – Infants born to mothers who've had weight-loss surgery have a higher risk for complications, and the risks are greatest for those born within two years of the surgery, a new study finds. "A recently postoperative mother with underlying nutritional, metabolic, and physiological changes is at an elevated risk for perinatal complications," concluded a team led by Dr. Brodie Parent, of the University of Washington Medical Center in Seattle. One obstetrician who reviewed the findings said the issue is arising more frequently as bariatric (weight-loss) surgeries surge in popularity. "I have been acutely aware of the recent increase in patients who have had bariatric procedures," said Dr. Brian McKennna, who directs gynecology at Northwell Health's Southside Hospital in Bay Shore, N.Y. "Many of these patients have had serious nutritional deficits even before their ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Weight Loss, Delivery, Gastric Bypass Surgery, Premature Labor, Labor Pain, Gastrointestinal Surgery, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy

Are There Alternatives to Statins?

Posted 27 Sep 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Sept. 27, 2016 – Statins are the go-to therapy for lowering "bad" LDL cholesterol, but other treatments also can effectively reduce risk of future heart problems, a new evidence review reports. These alternative therapies – including a heart-healthy diet, other cholesterol-lowering medications, and even intestinal bypass surgery – seem to confer the same level of heart health protection as statins when cholesterol levels decrease, according to the findings. Nonstatin therapies reduced the risk of heart problems by 25 percent for each 1 millimole per liter (mmol/L) decrease in LDL cholesterol levels. That's very similar to the 23 percent reduction per 1 mmol/L decrease seen with statins like atorvastatin (Lipitor) and simvastatin (Zocor), the researchers said. What's more, the benefits of these therapies stack up if more than one proves effective at lowering a person's ... Read more

Related support groups: High Cholesterol, Lipitor, Simvastatin, Atorvastatin, Crestor, Pravastatin, Welchol, Cholestyramine, Zocor, Lovastatin, Zetia, Rosuvastatin, Vytorin, High Cholesterol - Familial Heterozygous, Hypertriglyceridemia, Gastric Bypass Surgery, Red Yeast Rice, Pravachol, Questran, Livalo

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