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Fungal Infections News

Related terms: Fungal Infection, Infection, Fungal

When Is It Nail Fungus?

Posted 27 Jul 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, July 27, 2017 – If you think you have nail fungus, you might be tempted to hide your problem with nail polish or self-treat with over-the-counter antifungal products. But you should visit a doctor instead, a dermatologist suggests. "Nail fungus can be an embarrassing problem, but you shouldn't be embarrassed to discuss it with a board-certified dermatologist, who can help you manage this condition," said Dr. Shari Lipner. She is an assistant professor of dermatology at Weill Cornell Medicine in New York City. "Although nail fungus is the most common nail disorder that dermatologists treat, not every nail problem is caused by fungus, and there are several other conditions that may look similar, including nail psoriasis and nail trauma," Lipner said in an American Academy of Dermatology news release. "If you treat something that's not a fungus as a fungus, it may not help your ... Read more

Related support groups: Monistat, Baclofen, Monistat 3, Monistat 7, Fungal Infections, Onychomycosis - Toenail, Ciclopirox, Jublia, Onychomycosis - Fingernail, Econazole, Lotrimin, Onychomycosis, Loprox, Naftin, Ting, Nystop, Tinactin, Kerydin, Penlac, Lioresal

Wallpaper May Breed Toxins: Study

Posted 23 Jun 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, June 23, 2017 – Wallpaper may contribute to "sick building syndrome," a new study suggests. Toxins from fungus growing on wallpaper can easily become airborne and pose an indoor health risk, the researchers said. In laboratory tests, "we demonstrated that mycotoxins could be transferred from a moldy material to air, under conditions that may be encountered in buildings," said study corresponding author Dr. Jean-Denis Bailly. "Thus, mycotoxins can be inhaled and should be investigated as parameters of indoor air quality, especially in homes with visible fungal contamination," added Bailly, a professor of food hygiene at the National Veterinary School of Toulouse, France. Sick building syndrome is the term used when occupants start feeling ill related to time spent in a particular building. Usually, no specific illness or cause can be identified, according to the U.S. National ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Fungal Infections

Germs, Mold Found in Some Medical Pot

Posted 15 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 15, 2017 – Medical marijuana carries infectious bacteria and fungi that can pose a life-threatening risk to cancer patients who use pot to help with side effects of chemotherapy, a new study suggests. The study was initially prompted by the death of a man using medical marijuana to combat the side effects of cancer treatment. His death was believed to be caused by a fungus from his marijuana, his doctor said. Study researchers tested 20 different samples of dried marijuana obtained from Northern California dispensaries and found several potentially dangerous pathogens in the samples. The germs found by the researchers wouldn't harm an average pot user, but could be potentially fatal to people whose immune systems have been suppressed, said lead researcher Dr. George Thompson III. "We found basically everything that, if you're really immunosuppressed, you don't want," ... Read more

Related support groups: Pain, Infections, Nausea/Vomiting, Cancer, Chronic Pain, Bacterial Infection, Vomiting, Fungal Infections, Nausea/Vomiting - Chemotherapy Induced, Cannabis, Nausea/Vomiting - Postoperative, Nausea/Vomiting - Radiation Induced, Mucormycosis, Invasive

Some Bats Swinging Back at Fungal Disease

Posted 12 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Dec. 12, 2016 – Some bats in North America appear to have developed resistance to a deadly fungal disease, researchers say. White-nose syndrome has led to declines of 90 percent or more in the numbers of several bat species, including the little brown bat. The fungal disease continues to afflict bats in the United States and Canada, disrupting their hydration and hibernation cycles, and leading to death. The fungus is transmitted from bat to bat. Now, some groups of little brown bats in New York state seem resistant to the disease, according to scientists at the University of California, Santa Cruz. The researchers found that little brown bat populations in New York state that had stabilized after initial declines in numbers had much lower infection levels at the end of winter than populations still in decline. "Populations of little brown bats have declined dramatically across ... Read more

Related support groups: Fungal Infections

Health Tip: Preparing for a Pedicure

Posted 23 Mar 2016 by Drugs.com

-- Getting a pedicure may seem routine, but without precautions you may be putting your health at risk. The American Podiatric Medical Association says you: Shouldn't shave your legs before a pedicure, or let the technician use a razor on your feet. Shouldn't allow the same tools to be used for both a manicure and pedicure. Shouldn't share or use an emery board that has been used on someone else. Bring your own. Shouldn't let the technician use a sharp tool to clean under your nails. Shouldn't round the nails. Keep the edges straight. Shouldn't cut cuticles or allow moisture to remain between your toes. Shouldn't ignore thickened or discolored nails. Unusual thickness or color may signal a fungal infection. Read more

Related support groups: Fungal Infections, Tinea Pedis, Fungal Infection Prophylaxis, Foot Care, Fungal Infection Prevention

FDA Medwatch Alert: Fluconazole Injection, USP, (in 0.9 Percent Sodium Chloride) 200mg per 100ml: Recall - Elevated Impurity

Posted 7 Mar 2016 by Drugs.com

ISSUE: Sagent has initiated a voluntary recall of one lot of Fluconazole Injection, USP, 200mg per 100mL to the user level due to the discovery of an out of specification impurity result detected during routine quality testing of stability samples at the 18-month interval.  This impurity has been identified as Metronidazole.  An elevated impurity has the potential to decrease effectiveness of the product in patients.  Patients on the product and on concomitant medication of Metronidazole may receive an increased dose of Metronidazole. BACKGROUND: The lot number being recalled is Lot 40608 which was distributed to hospitals, wholesalers and distributors nationwide from November 2014 through December 2014.  Fluconazole Injection, USP, 200mg per 100mL is indicated, for the treatment of Oropharyngeal and esophageal candidiasis, cryptococcal meningitis, and is supplied in 100mL and 200mL fle ... Read more

Related support groups: Fluconazole, Diflucan, Fungal Infections

Skin Infections Common in High School Wrestlers, Study Finds

Posted 10 Feb 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 10, 2016 – Wrestlers are much more likely to suffer skin infections than other U.S. high school athletes, new research shows. The study authors examined five years of data on skin infections among athletes in 22 high school sports. Nearly 74 percent of skin infections occurred among wrestlers, and just under 18 percent among football players, the investigators found. The actual rates of skin infections per 100,000 exposures (one athlete participating in one practice, competition or performance) were 28.5 among wrestlers and 2.3 among football players. Rates in most other sports were less than 1 per 100,000, and eight sports had none, according to the report. "Given the nature of the sport, it's not surprising that wrestlers suffer the most skin infections," study senior author Dr. Robert Dellavalle, an associate professor of dermatology at the University of Colorado ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Bacterial Infection, Bacterial Skin Infection, Fungal Infections, Tinea Corporis, Skin and Structure Infection, Candida Infections, Tinea Cruris, Tinea Pedis, Fungal Infection Prophylaxis, Fungal Infection Prevention

Cresemba Approved for Serious Fungal Infections

Posted 8 Mar 2015 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, March 6, 2015 – Cresemba (isavuconazonium sulfate) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat rare but serious fungal infections, mostly affecting people with weakened immune systems, the agency said Friday in a news release. The infections are caused by Aspergillus and Mucorales fungi. The new drug, targeting the cell walls of the fungi, is available in oral and intravenous formulations. Cresmba's safety and effectiveness were evaluated in clinical studies involving more than 500 people. The most common side effects included nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, headache, low blood potassium, constipation, shortness of breath, coughing and tissue swelling. More serious adverse effects could include liver problems and allergic reactions. Cresemba is marketed by Astellas Pharma US, based in Northbrook, Ill. More information The FDA has more about this approval. Read more

Related support groups: Fungal Infections, Aspergillosis - Invasive

FDA Approves Cresemba (isavuconazonium sulfate) For Fungal Infections

Posted 6 Mar 2015 by Drugs.com

March 6, 2015 – The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Cresemba (isavuconazonium sulfate), a new antifungal drug product used to treat adults with invasive aspergillosis and invasive mucormycosis, rare but serious infections. Aspergillosis is a fungal infection caused by Aspergillus species, and mucormycosis is caused by the Mucorales fungi. These infections occur most often in people with weakened immune systems. Cresemba belongs to a class of drugs called azole antifungal agents, which target the cell wall of a fungus. Cresemba is available in oral and intravenous formulations. “Today’s approval provides a new treatment option for patients with serious fungal infections and underscores the importance of having available safe and effective antifungal drugs,” said Edward Cox, M.D., M.P.H, director of the Office of Antimicrobial Products in the FDA’s Center for Drug Eval ... Read more

Related support groups: Fungal Infections, Aspergillosis, Aspergillosis - Invasive

California Trees Harbor Fungus Deadly to People With HIV

Posted 28 Aug 2014 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Aug. 28, 2014 – A potentially deadly fungus that has been sickening HIV/AIDS patients in Southern California for decades grows on trees, a new study finds. The team of scientists who published the research note that they were tipped off to the finding by a teen girl's science fair project. The Cryptococcus gattii fungus triggers infections of the lungs and brains and is responsible for a full third of all AIDS-related deaths, the researchers noted. They found that three tree species – Canary Island pine, Pohutukawa and American sweetgum – harbor the fungus and are sources of human infection. "Just as people who travel to South America are told to be careful about drinking the water, people who visit other areas like California, the Pacific Northwest and Oregon need to be aware that they are at risk for developing a fungal infection, especially if their immune system is ... Read more

Related support groups: HIV Infection, Fungal Infections

Blood Test May Catch Deadly Fungal Infection Quickly

Posted 24 Apr 2013 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, April 24 – An experimental test could help doctors catch a deadly type of fungal infection in the blood within a few hours, rather than the few days it currently takes, a new study suggests. The test, which is not yet on the market, looks for Candida infection in the blood. The fungus is best known for causing common vaginal yeast infections, but when it gets into the bloodstream it can cause serious infections of organs and tissue throughout the body. Candida blood infections – known as candidemia – are very rare in healthy people, but they are the fourth most common type of blood infection among U.S. hospital patients, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The infection is typically transmitted through contaminated catheters, and seen in seriously ill patients – such as those in the intensive care unit, or with weakened immune systems. The ... Read more

Related support groups: Fungal Infections

Flesh-Eating Fungal Infection Can Follow Natural Disasters, Study Finds

Posted 5 Dec 2012 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 5 – After a natural disaster, doctors should be on the lookout for outbreaks of a rare but deadly "flesh-eating" fungal infection, researchers at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported Wednesday. That's the lesson, the agency said, from 13 cases of mucormycosis skin infections that struck victims of the Joplin, Mo., tornado last year. The May 2011 tornado was one of the deadliest in U.S. history, killing almost 160 people and injuring more than 1,000. In the aftermath, doctors found that some victims with serious injuries were developing severe infections that ate away at the skin and underlying soft tissue. It turned out to be mucormycosis, a fungal infection caused by a group of molds found in soil and decaying matter, such as fallen leaves and rotting wood. The fungus can attack various parts of the body, but skin infections occur when the ... Read more

Related support groups: Fungal Infections, Systemic Fungal Infection, Cutaneous Fungal Infection

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Fungal Infection Prophylaxis, Fungal Infection Prevention, Systemic Fungal Infection, Cutaneous Fungal Infection