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Related terms: Adhesive capsulitis

Is a Common Shoulder Surgery Useless?

Posted 1 day 22 hours ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Nov. 21, 2017 – New research casts doubt on the true effectiveness of a common type of surgery used to ease shoulder pain. A British research team tracked outcomes for patients who underwent "decompression surgery" to treat shoulder impingement – a condition where a shoulder tendon rubs and catches in the joint. In decompression surgery, a small area of bone and soft tissue in the shoulder joint is removed, opening up the joint to prevent the abrasion that happens when the arm is lifted. All of the patients had suffered shoulder pain for at least three months despite nonsurgical approaches, including physiotherapy and steroid injections. So, the patients were then sent to decompression surgery (90 patients), a placebo surgery where they thought they got the procedure but didn't (94 patients), or no treatment (90 patients). In the placebo surgery, the surgeons looked inside ... Read more

Related support groups: Orthopedic Surgery, Frozen Shoulder

Divers May Be Plunging Into A Whole Lot Of Injury Trouble

Posted 16 days ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Nov. 7, 2017 – A well-executed dive may look graceful and effortless, but competitive diving can take a toll on the body, a doctor warns. "Even when a dive is perfectly executed, injuries can occur, whether traumatic or from overuse," said Dr. Nathaniel Jones, a sports medicine physician at Loyola University Health System in Maywood, Ill. Jones noted that a springboard diver strikes the water at up to 19 miles per hour and a 10-meter platform diver at up to 37 mph. After hitting the water, their speed drops by more than 50 percent in a fraction of a second. "These incredible velocities and impact forces are thought to be large contributors to competitive diving injuries," Jones reported in a recent issue of the journal Current Sports Medicine Reports. "With such forces, injuries can occur not only in the setting of a dive gone wrong, but also more commonly secondary to an ... Read more

Related support groups: Muscle Pain, Fracture, bone, Frozen Shoulder, Compression Fracture of Vertebral Column, Prevention of Fractures

What Exercise Regimen Is Best for Healthy Weight Loss in Seniors?

Posted 2 Nov 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Nov. 2, 2017 – Seniors who want to lose weight should hit the weight room while they cut calories, a new study suggests. Older folks who performed resistance training while dieting were able to lose fat but still preserve most of their lean muscle mass, compared with those who walked for exercise, researchers report. "The thought is if you lose too much lean mass, that this will exacerbate risk of disability in older adults," said lead researcher Kristen Beavers, an assistant professor of health and exercise science at Wake Forest University in Winston-Salem, N.C. "Our findings show if your treatment goal is to maximize fat loss and minimize lean mass loss, then the resistance training is probably the way to go." Excess pounds significantly contribute to frailty and disability in old age, but there's concern that dieting alone might rob older adults of the muscle they need to ... Read more

Related support groups: Muscle Pain, Weight Loss, Frozen Shoulder, Dietary Fiber Supplementation, Cachexia

Health Tip: Tendonitis 101

Posted 30 Oct 2017 by Drugs.com

-- Tendonitis occurs when the thick cords of tissue that connect muscles to bone become inflamed and painful. Tendonitis can be triggered by an injury, muscle overuse, improper stretching or incorrect form during exercise, the American Podiatric Medical Association says. The condition usually resolves on its own with rest, ice and elevation. But it may be time to visit the doctor if symptoms don't improve within a week. Read more

Related support groups: Muscle Pain, Tendonitis, Frozen Shoulder

Your Robot Masseuse Will See You Now

Posted 12 Oct 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Oct. 12, 2017 – The backaches of the future may have a new remedy – developers say a robot masseuse is now treating patients in Singapore. Known as Emma (for Expert Manipulative Massage Automation), the robot mimics the human palm and thumb and specializes in back and knee massages, according to its developers. It is used alongside a doctor and massage therapist and, the developers said, "provides a massage that is described by patients as almost indistinguishable from a professional masseuse." The device was developed by AiTreat, a technology startup company launched at Nanyang Technological University in Singapore. Use of the robot began Oct. 9 at the NovaHealth Traditional Chinese Medicine clinic in Singapore. Emma has sensors that measure tendon and muscle stiffness and can calculate the optimal massage and track a patient's recovery over a course of treatments, ... Read more

Related support groups: Pain, Back Pain, Muscle Pain, Frozen Shoulder

Early Rotator Cuff Surgery Helps Return to Activity

Posted 23 Aug 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 23, 2017 – Early surgery to fix tears in a shoulder rotator cuff muscle is a good idea because it improves strength, function and other outcomes in the long term, a new study from France finds. Researchers also believe this kind of repair can prevent the rotator cuff muscle from deteriorating. This kind of repair "maintained considerable improvement in clinical and radiographic outcomes at 10 years," reported the study authors. They were led by orthopedic surgeon Dr. Phillipe Collin from the Hospital Center of Saint-Gregoire. The rotator cuff is a group of four muscles forming at the shoulder over the upper arm bone. Tears in the rotator cuff are common shoulder injuries. Many of them start with one of the muscles, the supraspinatus tendon, found at the top of the arm. There's been controversy over the best treatment approach for these injuries, the study authors said. ... Read more

Related support groups: Orthopedic Surgery, Frozen Shoulder

Stretches: The Forgotten Exercise

Posted 7 Aug 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Aug. 7, 2017 – Along with aerobic and strength training, stretching is an important part of every workout routine. But many people make the mistake of skipping this key step or doing certain stretches at the wrong time. Stretching improves flexibility and helps maintain good range of motion in your joints. It may even prevent injury. Timing is important, though. Starting your workout with dynamic stretches can prep your body for the exercise to come, according to the American Council on Exercise (ACE). These are stretches that take your body through a range of motions and raise your core temperature. On the other hand, static stretches – stretches you get into and hold for a certain length of time without moving – before exercise can strain or pull a muscle. So, save such stretches for after your workout when your muscles are warm and loose, the ACE says. It's important to ... Read more

Related support groups: Back Pain, Muscle Pain, Neck Pain, Frozen Shoulder

As Many as 1 in 3 Experience New or Worse Pain With Yoga

Posted 3 Aug 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Aug. 3, 2017 – Many people try yoga hoping to heal an injury, but some wind up with more aches and pains, a new study finds. The study, which surveyed hundreds of people doing yoga for more than a year, found that two-thirds said that some existing aches improved because of yoga – most often, lower back and neck pain. On the other hand, 21 percent said yoga worsened their muscle or joint pain. And almost 11 percent said it caused new issues – most commonly, pain in the hand, wrist, elbow or shoulder. The study didn't delve into specific injuries, but instead asked people about general aches in different body areas. So it's hard to know how serious the problems were, said Tom Swain, a researcher with the Center for Injury Sciences at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. "You don't have to sustain a serious injury to have pain. It could just be sore muscles," said Swain, ... Read more

Related support groups: Pain, Back Pain, Muscle Pain, Neck Pain, Frozen Shoulder

Take the (Exercise) Plunge

Posted 1 Aug 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Aug. 1, 2017 – You can do more than just beat the heat the next time you go to the pool. Whether you swim or do aquatic exercises, working out in water improves strength, flexibility and cardiovascular health. Water provides more resistance than air, allowing you to exercise at a higher intensity with less wear and tear on the body and less risk of injury. That's great for people with joint pain. Swimming is a perfect water workout, according to the American Council on Exercise. Doing a half hour of the front crawl at an easy pace can burn about 250 calories, depending on your weight. If you pick up the pace, you can burn about 400 calories in the same amount of time. If you're new to swimming, start with 5- to 10-minute sessions. As you build stamina, add more minutes. Mixing up your strokes can keep your routine from getting boring as well as work different muscles. For ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Muscle Pain, Weight Loss, Frozen Shoulder, Prevention of Falls

New Surgery May Fix Tough-to-Treat Rotator Cuff Tears

Posted 26 Jul 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, July 25, 2017 – A new surgical procedure can help people with shoulder injuries once considered beyond repair, a small new study suggests. Out of 100 patients who had the surgery in the study, all 26 of those who had played sports before the surgery were able to play sports again afterwards. Thirty-two patients who had jobs lifting heavy workloads were able to return completely to work. Another two – a farmer and a manual worker – were also able to return to work, but with reduced hours and reduced workloads. The procedure is called arthroscopic superior capsule reconstruction (SCR) surgery. It was developed by Japanese surgeons to fix rotator cuff injuries once considered irreparable. The rotator cuff is a group of muscles, tendons and ligaments that attach your arm to your shoulder. The rotator cuff helps you lift and rotate your arm, according to the American Academy of ... Read more

Related support groups: Pain, Orthopedic Surgery, Frozen Shoulder

Anabolic Steroids May Tax the Heart

Posted 22 May 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, May 22, 2017 – Long-term use of muscle-building anabolic steroids may take a toll on the heart, researchers say. Bodybuilders who take these drugs to bulk up should take note: prolonged use of anabolic steroids makes it harder for the heart to function properly. The steroids might also contribute to artery-clogging, study findings showed. "It is critical that clinicians become aware of the long-term risks of anabolic steroid use on the heart," said Dr. Harrison Pope Jr., a professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School and co-lead author of the study. Anabolic steroids are synthetic variations of the male hormone testosterone. An estimated 2.9 million to 4 million Americans have used these drugs, and about one million are dependent on the pills or injections, the researchers said. For the new study, Pope and his colleagues tracked 140 male weight-lifters. Eighty-six had used ... Read more

Related support groups: Muscle Pain, Testosterone, AndroGel, Testim, Axiron, Frozen Shoulder, Androderm, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Depo-Testosterone, Fortesta, Testopel, Testopel Pellets, Stanozolol, Winstrol, Methyltestosterone, Oxandrolone, Android, Durabolin, Testim 5 g/packet

Stronger Muscles May Pump Up Kids' Memory Skills

Posted 20 Apr 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, April 19, 2017 – Here's yet another reason to make sure your kids are active: New research shows those with stronger muscles may have better working memory. Evaluating 79 children between the ages of 9 and 11, scientists said they found that muscle fitness was directly related to a more accurate memory. The results also reinforced established research linking kids' aerobic fitness to better thinking skills and academic performance. "There are multiple ways children can derive benefit from exercise ... to build healthy bodies as well as healthy minds," said study co-author Charles Hillman. He's a professor of psychology and health sciences at Northeastern University in Boston. "We know that kids are becoming increasingly inactive, overweight and unfit," Hillman added. "So, it's important to take studies like these ... to basically indicate the benefit of physical activity and ... Read more

Related support groups: Muscle Pain, Frozen Shoulder, Mild Cognitive Impairment

Many College Football Players Lack Vitamin D: Study

Posted 17 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, March 16, 2017 – Low vitamin D levels are common among college football players and may put them at increased risk for injuries, a new study suggests. "Vitamin D has been shown to play a role in muscle function and strength," said senior study author Dr. Scott Rodeo, co-chief emeritus of the sports medicine and shoulder service at the Hospital for Special Surgery in New York City. "While most prior studies have focused on the aging population as the group most likely to experience the harmful effects of inadequate vitamin D, few reports have looked at the impact on muscle injury and function in the high-performance athlete," he said in a hospital news release. In the study, Rodeo's team assessed 214 college football players, average age 22. The investigators found that nearly 60 percent had low levels of vitamin D, including 10 percent with a severe deficiency. Those players ... Read more

Related support groups: Muscle Pain, Frozen Shoulder, Caltrate 600 with D, Calcium/Vitamin D, Citracal Petites, Citracal + D, Calcarb with D, Oyster Shell Calcium, Calcium 600 D, Citracal Creamy Bites, Calcet, Citracal 250 mg + D, Oystercal-D, Os-Cal with D, Sedecal D, Calcio Del Mar, Oysco 500 with D, Citracal Maximum, Dical-D, Caltrate Colon Health

Health Tip: Stay Safe During Winter Sports

Posted 20 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

-- Skiing and snowboarding are fun ways to exercise and make the most of winter. But safety is still a priority. The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons advises: Always head out with a buddy when you participate in a winter sport. Make sure you're well-conditioned. Warm up cold muscles and ligaments before playing. Drink plenty of water, and don't play if you are tired or in pain. Always wear a helmet, gloves and other protective equipment recommended for your sport. Inspect before use to make sure equipment fits and is in good shape. Dress in layers and don needed footwear. Watch for weather advisories before heading out. Follow all rules for your sport. If you're a novice, consider taking lessons with a certified instructor. Watch for signs of frostbite, including numbness, tingling or discolored skin. If you have any of them, seek shelter and help immediately. Read more

Related support groups: Muscle Pain, Fracture, bone, Frozen Shoulder, Prevention of Fractures

Student-Athletes Don't Have to Be Hit By Injuries

Posted 16 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 15, 2017 – Most injuries to student-athletes occur during routine practices, but only about a third of public high schools have a full-time trainer, according to the U.S.-based National Athletic Trainers' Association (NATA). "It's important to have the right sports safety protocols in place to ensure the health and welfare of student athletes," said Larry Cooper, chairman of NATA's secondary school committee. "By properly preparing for practices and competitions, young athletes can excel on the field and stay off the sidelines with potential injuries." As spring season approaches, NATA recommends parents and students review their school's policies and procedures on sports-related injuries. Here's what to consider: Who handles sports-related injuries? Know who will care for athletes who are hurt during practice. Consider that person's experience and credentials, ... Read more

Related support groups: Muscle Pain, Head Injury, Fracture, bone, Frozen Shoulder, Head Injury with Intracranial Hemorrhage, Head Injury with Loss of Consciousness, Prevention of Fractures

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