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Martial Arts Can Be Hazardous to Kids

Posted 5 days ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Nov. 28, 2016 – Perhaps there's a black belt in your child's future. But for safety's sake, kids should only engage in noncontact forms of martial arts, a new American Academy of Pediatrics report says. About 6.5 million U.S. children practice martial arts such as mixed martial arts, karate, taekwondo and judo. While these popular sports can improve fitness, motor skills and emotional development, they also carry the risk of injury. Certain disciplines are riskier than others, the pediatricians' group says. "There are so many different types of martial arts for families to consider and enjoy, but such a difference in injury risk between the different non-contact and sparring forms," report author Dr. Chris Koutures said in a news release from the medical group. Koutures is a member of the academy's Executive Committee on Sports Medicine and Fitness. Bruises and sprains account ... Read more

Related support groups: Muscle Pain, Head Injury, Fracture, bone, Frozen Shoulder, Compression Fracture of Vertebral Column, Head Injury w/ Intracranial Hemorrhage and Loss of Consciousness, Head Injury with Loss of Consciousness, Prevention of Fractures

Health Tip: Coping With a Muscle Cramp

Posted 8 days ago by Drugs.com

-- A painful muscle cramp can occur if you don't stretch before a workout. The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons recommends: Stopping any activity that led to the cramp. Slowly and gently stretching the muscle. Hold it in that position until the cramp subsides. Gently massaging the muscle while stretching it to help it relax. Applying heat if the muscle and others nearby are tight and tense. Applying cold if the muscles are sore and tender. Read more

Related support groups: Muscle Spasm, Muscle Pain, Nocturnal Leg Cramps, Muscle Twitching, Frozen Shoulder

Health Tip: Stretch Before and After a Workout

Posted 6 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

-- You work out as often as possible. But do you know how to stretch properly? The American Council on Exercise offers these stretching suggestions: Breathe in deeply, then slowly exhale as you stretch the desired muscle to tension. Hold for up to 30 seconds, then relax and repeat the stretch a few more times. Hold the stretch still (moving as little as possible), which can help prevent you from hurting yourself. Don't stretch a muscle that isn't properly warmed up. Don't stretch a muscle to the point that it hurts. Breathe normally as you stretch; never hold your breath. Read more

Related support groups: Muscle Pain, Frozen Shoulder, Prevention of Fractures

Health Tip: Don't Skip Flexibility Exercises

Posted 12 Sep 2016 by Drugs.com

-- A flexibility exercise, such as stretching, is designed to increase the tone and flexibility of a certain muscle. The American Council on Exercise says potential benefits include: Better freedom of movement. Relaxation of tense or sore muscles. Lower risk of injury. Read more

Related support groups: Muscle Pain, Frozen Shoulder

The Football Injuries Most Likely to End an NFL Career

Posted 8 Sep 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Sept. 8, 2016 – When the NFL season kicks off Thursday night with a rematch between last year's Super Bowl teams, the Carolina Panthers and the Denver Broncos, football fans will be focusing on which franchise claims victory this time around. But fears of career-ending injuries lurk in the back of the minds of professional football players every time they take the field, and a new study sheds some light on exactly what kinds of injuries can be most devastating. It turns out that tendon and ligament injuries are potentially worse than broken and dislocated bones when it comes to complete recovery, the new study showed. Tears of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and injured tendons in the kneecap and the Achilles heel seemed to keep players off the field or diminish their future performance more than other orthopedic injuries, the researchers found. "While these injuries [of ... Read more

Related support groups: Muscle Pain, Head Injury, Tendonitis, Fracture, bone, Orthopedic Surgery, Frozen Shoulder, Compression Fracture of Vertebral Column, Head Injury with Loss of Consciousness

Health Tip: Recognize Overuse Injuries in Kids

Posted 8 Sep 2016 by Drugs.com

-- Children who frequently play sports may be at risk for an overuse injury. The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons says it may be a red flag if your child demonstrates: Pain that gets worse with activity. The pain can't be linked to a specific injury. Swelling. Loss of interest in sports practice. Change in form or technique. Read more

Related support groups: Muscle Pain, Frozen Shoulder, Prevention of Fractures

Don't Shrug Off Shoulder Safety When Playing Summer Sports

Posted 5 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Aug. 5, 2016 – Millions of Americans enjoy summer sports, but nobody enjoys heading to the emergency room when their favorite form of exercise leads to serious shoulder pain. However, doctors who specialize in joint health and sports medicine have some suggestions on how you can take steps to avoid this kind of injury. "Sports such as swimming, golfing and volleyball require repetitive, overhead motion. The rotator cuff muscles are often the target of injuries and can get irritated or fatigued with overuse," said orthopedic surgeon Dr. Vani Sabesan. She is a spokeswoman for the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS). It's important to practice safe techniques with each sport to safeguard against injuries and to take rest periods from time to time, Sabesan said in an academy news release. The AAOS and the American Orthopaedic Society of Sports Medicine offer the ... Read more

Related support groups: Muscle Pain, Frozen Shoulder

Health Tip: If You Have Pain in Your Shins

Posted 2 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

-- Pain in the shins, commonly called shin splints, often is caused by trying to exercise too much, too soon. The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons says warning signs of shin splints include: Pain along the edge of the bone in the front of your leg. Swelling in the tibia. Pain that may throb, feel dull, sharp or like a razor. Pain during exercise, or after you've finished activity. Tenderness while touching the affected area. Read more

Related support groups: Pain, Muscle Pain, Frozen Shoulder

Shouting? The 'Silent Treatment'? How Spouses Argue Linked to Physical Ills

Posted 14 Jun 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, June 14, 2016 – How spouses disagree may predict which ones are more likely to develop certain ailments down the road, new research suggests. Analyzing 156 older couples over 20 years, scientists found that patterns of angry outbursts raised the risk of heart problems, while emotional withdrawal or "stonewalling" could lead to musculoskeletal issues such as back pain or stiff neck. "We've known for a long time that stress and negative emotions are bad for your health," said study author Claudia Haase. She's an assistant professor of human development and social policy at Northwestern University in Evanston, Ill. "But in our new study we wanted to dig deeper, and found that very specific behaviors led to specific health problems over time," she added. Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death and a major cause of disability worldwide, according to the World Health ... Read more

Related support groups: Pain, Anxiety and Stress, Back Pain, Chronic Pain, Muscle Pain, Heart Disease, Neck Pain, Agitation, Frozen Shoulder, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Ischemic Heart Disease

Health Tip: Need a Time-Out From Athletic Training?

Posted 7 Apr 2016 by Drugs.com

-- Training for an athletic event can push your body to its limits, so it's important to know when to back off. The American Council on Exercise mentions these warning signs that you're overdoing it: It's very difficult to get through your entire routine. You're always in pain, sore, sluggish or fatigued. You're having strong cravings for certain foods or binge eating. You're noticing changes in your emotional health, including feeling irritable, depressed or moody. You're not seeing the results you expect. You're frequently hurt. You're choosing exercise over other important things, such as social events or sleep. Read more

Related support groups: Muscle Pain, Fracture, bone, Frozen Shoulder, Prevention of Fractures

Health Tip: Get Stretching

Posted 19 Jan 2016 by Drugs.com

-- Stretching is great for your muscles, but take steps to make sure you're doing it properly to help avoid injury. The Mayo Clinic suggests: Always warm up with a short walk or jog before stretching. Stretching should not be considered your warm-up. Stretch the major muscle groups and joints that you use regularly each day. Hold your stretch for 30 seconds to 60 seconds in a position that isn't painful. Never bounce when you stretch. If you play a sport, make your stretching specific to that sport. Be consistent with your stretching, and aim for at least two to three times per week. Incorporate gentle movements, such as yoga or tai chi, with your stretching. Read more

Related support groups: Muscle Pain, Fracture, bone, Frozen Shoulder, Prevention of Fractures

How to Clear Snow Without Getting Hurt

Posted 14 Dec 2015 by Drugs.com

SUNDAY, Dec. 13, 2015 – Snow removal is a major cause of winter-related injuries, but there are several ways to reduce your risk, an expert says. "Individuals tend to haste through snow shoveling to avoid being outside in the cold for long periods of time," orthopedic surgeon Dr. Joseph Abboud, spokesman for the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS), said in an academy news release. "Unfortunately, rushing through this task can lead to injuries. It should always be done at a slow and steady pace because of the energy and focus that's required. Always check with your doctor before shoveling snow and consider hiring someone to do it for you if you're unable to," he advised. In 2014, more than 203,000 Americans required treatment for injuries suffered while manually clearing snow, and nearly 27,000 were injured using snow blowers or throwers, according to the U.S. Consumer ... Read more

Related support groups: Pain, Suboxone, Oxycodone, Back Pain, Hydrocodone, Methadone, Percocet, Tramadol, OxyContin, Vicodin, Norco, Fentanyl, Morphine, Codeine, Lortab, Tylenol, Muscle Pain, Opana, Ibuprofen, Subutex

Health Tip: Preventing Sprains and Strains

Posted 26 Oct 2015 by Drugs.com

-- For anyone who exercises, especially athletes, sprains and strains are a part of the game. To help ward off these soft-tissue injuries, the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons suggests: Make sure clothing fits loosely and comfortably, and shoes are in good shape. Use protective gear. Create a balanced exercise regimen that incorporates different types of activity. Always warm up before a workout and cool down afterward. Drink plenty of water before, during and after exercise. Exercise for at least 30 minutes each day. But take a day off when you're tired or sore. Read more

Related support groups: Pain, Back Pain, Muscle Pain, Ibuprofen, Naproxen, Meloxicam, Diclofenac, Advil, Voltaren, Aleve, Mobic, Fioricet, Motrin, Excedrin, Indomethacin, Tylenol PM, Toradol, Etodolac, Ultracet, Nabumetone

Common Shoulder Injury Heals Well Without Surgery: Study

Posted 22 Oct 2015 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Oct. 22, 2015 – A common shoulder injury that is usually repaired with surgery can heal just as well with nonsurgical treatment, a new study suggests. And, the researchers added, those who decide against surgery for a dislocated shoulder joint develop fewer complications and get back to work sooner. But, surgery patients seem more satisfied with the appearance of their shoulder after treatment. Found at the top of the shoulder between the collarbone and the shoulder blade, the acromioclavicular (AC) joint is often injured during sports. It can also be dislocated in a fall or car accident. People with a minor injury can wear a sling and undergo physical therapy. More severe dislocations are often treated with surgery involving a plate and screws, according to the researchers. "For severe AC joint dislocations, surgery is the common practice but there's not much evidence to ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Frozen Shoulder, Orthopedic Surgery

Expert Tips for Preventing Kids' Sports Injuries

Posted 25 Sep 2015 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Sept. 25, 2015 – "Put me in, Coach," may be a common plea heard from young athletes. But sports medicine experts suggest that benching players for at least part of the year might help prevent sports-related injuries. "The biggest problem right now is that many children and teens are not taking time off from their sports activities," said Dr. James Penna, an orthopedic surgeon at Stony Brook University Hospital in Stony Brook, N.Y. "Young athletes need to rest, but many participate in sports year-round, which can result in overuse injuries," he said in a hospital news release. To prevent overuse injuries such as stress and growth plate fractures, Penna recommends taking a two- to four-month break from any one sport, "especially the sports that involve overhand motion such as tennis and baseball," he said. Children who participate in year-round sports such as gymnastics and ... Read more

Related support groups: Muscle Pain, Head Injury, Fracture, bone, Frozen Shoulder, Compression Fracture of Vertebral Column, Prevention of Fractures

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