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Many College Football Players Lack Vitamin D: Study

Posted 12 days ago by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, March 16, 2017 – Low vitamin D levels are common among college football players and may put them at increased risk for injuries, a new study suggests. "Vitamin D has been shown to play a role in muscle function and strength," said senior study author Dr. Scott Rodeo, co-chief emeritus of the sports medicine and shoulder service at the Hospital for Special Surgery in New York City. "While most prior studies have focused on the aging population as the group most likely to experience the harmful effects of inadequate vitamin D, few reports have looked at the impact on muscle injury and function in the high-performance athlete," he said in a hospital news release. In the study, Rodeo's team assessed 214 college football players, average age 22. The investigators found that nearly 60 percent had low levels of vitamin D, including 10 percent with a severe deficiency. Those players ... Read more

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Health Tip: Stay Safe During Winter Sports

Posted 20 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

-- Skiing and snowboarding are fun ways to exercise and make the most of winter. But safety is still a priority. The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons advises: Always head out with a buddy when you participate in a winter sport. Make sure you're well-conditioned. Warm up cold muscles and ligaments before playing. Drink plenty of water, and don't play if you are tired or in pain. Always wear a helmet, gloves and other protective equipment recommended for your sport. Inspect before use to make sure equipment fits and is in good shape. Dress in layers and don needed footwear. Watch for weather advisories before heading out. Follow all rules for your sport. If you're a novice, consider taking lessons with a certified instructor. Watch for signs of frostbite, including numbness, tingling or discolored skin. If you have any of them, seek shelter and help immediately. Read more

Related support groups: Muscle Pain, Fracture, bone, Frozen Shoulder, Prevention of Fractures

Student-Athletes Don't Have to Be Hit By Injuries

Posted 16 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 15, 2017 – Most injuries to student-athletes occur during routine practices, but only about a third of public high schools have a full-time trainer, according to the U.S.-based National Athletic Trainers' Association (NATA). "It's important to have the right sports safety protocols in place to ensure the health and welfare of student athletes," said Larry Cooper, chairman of NATA's secondary school committee. "By properly preparing for practices and competitions, young athletes can excel on the field and stay off the sidelines with potential injuries." As spring season approaches, NATA recommends parents and students review their school's policies and procedures on sports-related injuries. Here's what to consider: Who handles sports-related injuries? Know who will care for athletes who are hurt during practice. Consider that person's experience and credentials, ... Read more

Related support groups: Muscle Pain, Head Injury, Fracture, bone, Frozen Shoulder, Head Injury with Intracranial Hemorrhage, Head Injury with Loss of Consciousness, Prevention of Fractures

Health Tip: Maintain Posture for Step Training

Posted 15 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

-- Step training is a great way to burn fat and build muscle, but it's important to use the right technique. The American Council on Exercise suggests: Straighten your neck, but keep muscles relaxed. Never lock your knees. Put your shoulders back, lift your chest up and tuck your pelvis under. As you step up onto the platform, lean from your ankles rather than your waist. Don't bend at the hips. Avoid arching your back. Read more

Related support groups: Back Pain, Muscle Pain, Sciatica, Scoliosis, Frozen Shoulder

Health Tip: Strength Training Is For Seniors, Too

Posted 1 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

-- Strength training isn't just for younger folks who want to bulk up. The American Council on Exercise explains that seniors may benefit from: Stronger muscles and bones, and a lower risk of falling. Better blood sugar control, faster digestion, improved metabolism and less fatty tissue. Lower risk of injury to the lower back. Faster recovery after a stroke or heart attack. Read more

Related support groups: Back Pain, Muscle Pain, Ischemic Stroke, Heart Attack, Myocardial Infarction, Frozen Shoulder, Ischemic Stroke - Prophylaxis, Prevention of Fractures

Scientists Create Clothing With 'Knitted' Muscle Power

Posted 26 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Jan. 26, 2017 – Scientists say they've created a special fabric incorporating robotic techniques that one day might help provide muscle power to disabled people or seniors who have trouble getting around. The Swedish team coated normal fabric with an electroactive material, enabling the fabric to respond to low voltage power. Electroactive means the material responds to electricity. This technology could lead to the creation of "textile muscles" that could be used in clothing to help people with mobility problems. The researchers used this approach in a simple robotic device to lift a small weight, according to the study. "Enormous and impressive advances have been made in the development of exoskeletons, which now enable people with disabilities to walk again. But the existing technology looks like rigid robotic suits," said study researcher Edwin Jager, an associate ... Read more

Related support groups: Muscle Spasm, Muscle Pain, Muscle Twitching, Frozen Shoulder, Cerebral Palsy, Family History of Musculoskeletal Disorder, History of Musculoskeletal Disorder

Health Tip: Use Ice to Ease Ankle Sprain Pain

Posted 16 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

-- Ice can help ease the pain and swelling of a sprained ankle, but it's important to use the therapy properly. The American Academy of Family Physicians suggests: Never apply ice for longer than 20 minutes. Always remove ice if the area starts to feel numb. For the first three days after a sprain, ice the ankle every two-to-four hours. Use an ice pack, ice slush bath or ice massage. For an ice pack, partially fill a plastic bag with crushed ice. With a towel or cloth over the skin, apply the pack and wrap it with an elastic bandage. For an ice slush bath, submerge the ankle into a bucket filled with ice and water. For an ice massage, use small styrofoam cups. Fill them with water and freeze them until solid. Remove the top section from the cup, then gently rub the ice around your ankle in circles, holding for no more than 30 seconds in each area. Read more

Related support groups: Pain, Muscle Pain, Frozen Shoulder, Radiation Injury of Bone

Joints Achy? Don't Blame Mother Nature

Posted 10 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Jan. 10, 2017 – You might want to think twice the next time you're ready to blame the weather for your aches and pains, researchers say. Some people swear that changes in humidity, temperature, air pressure and the like trigger back pain and arthritis. But a team at the George Institute for Global Health in Newtown, Australia said it found no evidence to support that theory. "The belief that pain and inclement weather are linked dates back to Roman times. But our research suggests this belief may be based on the fact that people recall events that confirm their pre-existing views," said Chris Maher, director of the institute's musculoskeletal division. The study included nearly 1,350 Australians with either lower back pain or osteoarthritis of the knee. The study participants' pain flare-ups were compared with weather data. There was no association between back pain/knee ... Read more

Related support groups: Pain, Back Pain, Rheumatoid Arthritis, Osteoarthritis, Muscle Pain, Sciatica, Neck Pain, Knee Joint Replacement, Scoliosis, Frozen Shoulder

Martial Arts Can Be Hazardous to Kids

Posted 28 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Nov. 28, 2016 – Perhaps there's a black belt in your child's future. But for safety's sake, kids should only engage in noncontact forms of martial arts, a new American Academy of Pediatrics report says. About 6.5 million U.S. children practice martial arts such as mixed martial arts, karate, taekwondo and judo. While these popular sports can improve fitness, motor skills and emotional development, they also carry the risk of injury. Certain disciplines are riskier than others, the pediatricians' group says. "There are so many different types of martial arts for families to consider and enjoy, but such a difference in injury risk between the different non-contact and sparring forms," report author Dr. Chris Koutures said in a news release from the medical group. Koutures is a member of the academy's Executive Committee on Sports Medicine and Fitness. Bruises and sprains account ... Read more

Related support groups: Muscle Pain, Head Injury, Fracture, bone, Frozen Shoulder, Compression Fracture of Vertebral Column, Head Injury w/ Intracranial Hemorrhage and Loss of Consciousness, Head Injury with Loss of Consciousness, Prevention of Fractures

Health Tip: Coping With a Muscle Cramp

Posted 25 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

-- A painful muscle cramp can occur if you don't stretch before a workout. The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons recommends: Stopping any activity that led to the cramp. Slowly and gently stretching the muscle. Hold it in that position until the cramp subsides. Gently massaging the muscle while stretching it to help it relax. Applying heat if the muscle and others nearby are tight and tense. Applying cold if the muscles are sore and tender. Read more

Related support groups: Muscle Spasm, Muscle Pain, Nocturnal Leg Cramps, Muscle Twitching, Frozen Shoulder

Health Tip: Stretch Before and After a Workout

Posted 6 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

-- You work out as often as possible. But do you know how to stretch properly? The American Council on Exercise offers these stretching suggestions: Breathe in deeply, then slowly exhale as you stretch the desired muscle to tension. Hold for up to 30 seconds, then relax and repeat the stretch a few more times. Hold the stretch still (moving as little as possible), which can help prevent you from hurting yourself. Don't stretch a muscle that isn't properly warmed up. Don't stretch a muscle to the point that it hurts. Breathe normally as you stretch; never hold your breath. Read more

Related support groups: Muscle Pain, Frozen Shoulder, Prevention of Fractures

Health Tip: Don't Skip Flexibility Exercises

Posted 12 Sep 2016 by Drugs.com

-- A flexibility exercise, such as stretching, is designed to increase the tone and flexibility of a certain muscle. The American Council on Exercise says potential benefits include: Better freedom of movement. Relaxation of tense or sore muscles. Lower risk of injury. Read more

Related support groups: Muscle Pain, Frozen Shoulder

The Football Injuries Most Likely to End an NFL Career

Posted 8 Sep 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Sept. 8, 2016 – When the NFL season kicks off Thursday night with a rematch between last year's Super Bowl teams, the Carolina Panthers and the Denver Broncos, football fans will be focusing on which franchise claims victory this time around. But fears of career-ending injuries lurk in the back of the minds of professional football players every time they take the field, and a new study sheds some light on exactly what kinds of injuries can be most devastating. It turns out that tendon and ligament injuries are potentially worse than broken and dislocated bones when it comes to complete recovery, the new study showed. Tears of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and injured tendons in the kneecap and the Achilles heel seemed to keep players off the field or diminish their future performance more than other orthopedic injuries, the researchers found. "While these injuries [of ... Read more

Related support groups: Muscle Pain, Head Injury, Tendonitis, Fracture, bone, Orthopedic Surgery, Frozen Shoulder, Compression Fracture of Vertebral Column, Head Injury with Loss of Consciousness

Health Tip: Recognize Overuse Injuries in Kids

Posted 8 Sep 2016 by Drugs.com

-- Children who frequently play sports may be at risk for an overuse injury. The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons says it may be a red flag if your child demonstrates: Pain that gets worse with activity. The pain can't be linked to a specific injury. Swelling. Loss of interest in sports practice. Change in form or technique. Read more

Related support groups: Muscle Pain, Frozen Shoulder, Prevention of Fractures

Don't Shrug Off Shoulder Safety When Playing Summer Sports

Posted 5 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Aug. 5, 2016 – Millions of Americans enjoy summer sports, but nobody enjoys heading to the emergency room when their favorite form of exercise leads to serious shoulder pain. However, doctors who specialize in joint health and sports medicine have some suggestions on how you can take steps to avoid this kind of injury. "Sports such as swimming, golfing and volleyball require repetitive, overhead motion. The rotator cuff muscles are often the target of injuries and can get irritated or fatigued with overuse," said orthopedic surgeon Dr. Vani Sabesan. She is a spokeswoman for the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS). It's important to practice safe techniques with each sport to safeguard against injuries and to take rest periods from time to time, Sabesan said in an academy news release. The AAOS and the American Orthopaedic Society of Sports Medicine offer the ... Read more

Related support groups: Muscle Pain, Frozen Shoulder

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