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Even a Little Daily Activity May Boost Colon Cancer Survival: Study

Posted 4 days ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Jan. 17, 2017 – Just a half hour a day of moderate physical activity could be potent medicine for patients with advanced colon cancer, preliminary research suggests. Study authors who tracked more than 1,200 colon cancer patients found a 19 percent decline in risk for early death among those who got 30 minutes or more of moderate exercise daily. And, five or more hours of moderate – but non-vigorous – activity a week pushed that survival benefit to 25 percent, researchers said. Walking, cleaning or gardening counted as moderate exercise, the study authors said. Exercise benefits previously have been reported for early stage cancer patients. "But this study extends to patients who have advanced cancer and a much more grim prognosis," said Dr. Andrew Chan. He's an associate professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School in Boston. "And even among that population, there seems ... Read more

Related support groups: Colonoscopy, Colorectal Cancer, Diagnosis and Investigation, Familial Adenomatous Polyposis

Vitamin E, Selenium Don't Cut Colon Cancer Risk: Study

Posted 22 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 21, 2016 – Taking vitamin E and selenium does not appear to reduce the risk of polyps that can lead to colon cancer, a new study finds. Researchers analyzed data from more than 6,500 men in the United States and Canada and found that those who took the two antioxidants did not have a lower risk of colon polyps than those who took placebos. "The message to the public is this: Vitamin E and selenium will not prevent colorectal adenomas, which are surrogates for colorectal cancer," lead author Dr. Peter Lance said in a news release from SWOG, the cancer clinical trials network funded by the U.S. National Cancer Institute. Lance is deputy director of the University of Arizona Cancer Center. He and his SWOG team used data from SELECT, a prostate cancer prevention trial that enrolled more than 35,000 healthy men – 21 percent were men of color – from 427 study sites in the ... Read more

Related support groups: Colonoscopy, Colorectal Cancer, Vitamin E, Selenium, Aquasol E, Familial Adenomatous Polyposis, Alpha E, MulTE-PAK-5, Chromic Chloride Hexahydrate/Copper Sulfate/Manganese Sulfate/Selenium/Zinc Sulfate, Aquavite-E, Vitec, Multitrace-5 Concentrate, E-Gems, E-400 Clear, PTE-5, NeoQ10, MTE-5 Concentrated, Amino-Opti-E, Selenium TR, Aqua Gem-E

Many Early Colon Cancers Linked to Inherited Genes

Posted 15 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Dec. 15, 2016 – As many as 1 in 6 colon cancer patients under the age of 50 has genetic traits that greatly boost the risk of cancer, a new study finds. "The prevalence of hereditary cancer syndromes among early onset colorectal cancer patients including Lynch syndrome, was quite high, which presents a tremendous opportunity for us to save lives through early detection based on genomic risk factor," lead investigator Heather Hampel said in an Ohio State University news release. Lynch syndrome is an inherited condition. It increases the rate of many cancers, including colon cancer, according to the U.S. National Library of Medicine. "It is critical that people find out at a young age if they are genetically predisposed to cancer so they can take steps to prevent cancer from occurring at all," Hampel said. She's with the Ohio Colorectal Cancer Prevention Initiative and is a ... Read more

Related support groups: Colonoscopy, Colorectal Cancer, Diagnosis and Investigation, Familial Adenomatous Polyposis

Colon Cancer's Location May Determine Patient Survival

Posted 27 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Oct. 27, 2016 – Where in the colon a cancer develops could affect a patient's chances for survival, a new report finds. At issue are so-called left-sided and right-sided colon cancers, one oncologist who reviewed the findings explained. "Left-sided cancers are located closer to the anus and located in the rectum, sigmoid colon and descending colon," said Dr. David Bernstein, chief of hepatology at Northwell Health in Manhasset, N.Y. "These cancers usually present with bleeding or partial obstruction [and] because of this presentation, patients tend to seek medical care earlier." On the other hand, "right-sided lesions – located in the first part of the colon, near the junction with the small intestine – do not typically present with obstruction but tend to present with anemia and are more likely to be associated with metastatic disease, especially to the liver," Bernstein ... Read more

Related support groups: Colonoscopy, Colorectal Cancer, Diagnosis and Investigation, Familial Adenomatous Polyposis

To Help Prevent Colon Cancer, 'Listen to Your Gut'

Posted 27 Sep 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Sept. 27, 2016 – Sometimes following up on a gut feeling can make the difference between life and death, especially for people with colon cancer, researchers report. People who pay attention to their digestive system are more likely to notice worrisome symptoms and seek medical attention sooner, said Dr. Amit Singal and colleagues at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas. And when colon cancer is caught early, it is usually easier to treat, Singal explained. "The old saying 'listen to your gut' holds true when it comes to your health. If you notice differences that persist more than a week, contact your physician," he said in a hospital news release. Singal is a gastroenterologist and an associate professor of internal medicine and clinical sciences. "Many conditions can cause digestive symptoms, but if it is cancer and you catch it early, you'll have a ... Read more

Related support groups: Colonoscopy, Colorectal Cancer, Diagnosis and Investigation, Familial Adenomatous Polyposis

Study: Colonoscopy After 75 May Not Be Worth It

Posted 26 Sep 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Sept. 26, 2016 – A colonoscopy can find and remove cancerous growths in the colon, but it may not provide much cancer prevention benefit after the age of 75, a new study suggests. A review of more than 1.3 million Medicare patients aged 70 to 79 found that having a colonoscopy reduced colon cancer risk slightly over eight years, from just under 3 percent to a little more than 2 percent in those younger than 75. But it had little or no effect on cancer risk among patients over 75. However, Robert Smith, vice president for cancer screening at the American Cancer Society, said it would be misguided to stop all colonoscopies for people once they turn 75. The better criterion is the overall health and life expectancy of the patient, he said. "The issue is with older adults whether or not there is any benefit for screening. After 75, you can make individualized decisions [about] ... Read more

Related support groups: Colonoscopy, Colorectal Cancer, Diagnosis and Investigation, Familial Adenomatous Polyposis

Vitamin A Compound Might Aid in Colon Cancer Fight

Posted 30 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Aug. 30, 2016 – Retinoic acid, a compound derived in the body from vitamin A, might have a role in suppressing colon cancer, new animal research suggests. "Retinoic acid has been known for years to be involved in suppressing inflammation in the intestine," said study senior author Dr. Edgar Engleman, professor of pathology and medicine at Stanford University School of Medicine in Palo Alto, Calif. Meanwhile, the development of colon cancer has been linked to inflammation. For example, inflammatory bowel disease, such as ulcerative colitis, has been associated with colon cancer, he said in a university news release. "We wanted to connect the dots and learn whether and how retinoic acid levels directly affect cancer development," Engleman added. When the researchers looked at mice with colon cancer, they saw lower levels of retinoic acid in the intestines of the mice. The ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Ulcerative Colitis, Colorectal Cancer, Ulcerative Colitis - Active, A-25, Ulcerative Colitis - Maintenance, Vitamin A, Diagnosis and Investigation, Familial Adenomatous Polyposis, Vitamin A Topical, A/Fish Oil, Retinol, Aquasol A

Omega-3s in Fish Tied to Better Colon Cancer Outcomes

Posted 21 Jul 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, July 21, 2016 – Colon cancer patients who take in higher amounts of omega-3 fatty acids, mainly from oily fish, may have better odds of survival, a new study finds. The study of almost 1,700 American adults with colon cancer was observational, meaning that it can't prove cause-and-effect. But it did seem to find a benefit from the healthy nutrient. One colon cancer expert who reviewed the new findings wasn't surprised. "We have long suspected the health benefits of omega-3 fatty acid supplementation," said Dr. Jules Garbus, a colorectal surgeon at Winthrop-University Hospital in Mineola, N.Y. "This study begins to show a correlation between 'healthy living' and reducing death from colorectal cancer." In the study, a team led by Dr. Andrew Chan, of Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, tracked data on 1,659 people diagnosed with colon cancer. During an average follow-up of ... Read more

Related support groups: Dietary Supplementation, Fish Oil, Lovaza, Colorectal Cancer, Omega-3, Omacor, MaxEPA, Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids, Marine Lipid Concentrate, EPA Fish Oil, Omega 3-6-9 Complex, Restora, Animi-3, Familial Adenomatous Polyposis, Sea-Omega 30, Epanova, Divista, Super-EPA, MegaKrill, Mi-Omega

Regular Doctor Visits Can Help Spot Colon Cancer

Posted 5 Jul 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, July 4, 2016 – Making regular visits to a primary care doctor increases the odds you'll be screened for colon cancer, a new study says. Colon cancer is the third most common cancer and the second leading cause of cancer death in the United States. But colon cancer screening is underused, the study authors said. "These findings help underscore the continued importance and effectiveness of visits with primary care physicians in a brave new world of virtual care and population health outreach," said study co-author Dr. Ethan Halm. He is director of the UT Southwestern Center for Patient-Centered Outcomes Research in Dallas. The study researchers analyzed data from more than 968,000 Americans, aged 50 to 74, in four health systems across the country. Those who saw a primary care doctor at least once a year were twice as likely to be screened for colon cancer. And they were 30 ... Read more

Related support groups: Colonoscopy, Colorectal Cancer, Familial Adenomatous Polyposis

Five New Genes Linked to Colon Cancer

Posted 24 Jun 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, June 24, 2016 – Scientists have identified five new gene mutations that may be tied to colon cancer. The findings are from an analysis of genes from more than 1,000 people with colon cancer. The links between these five gene mutations were very rare, so further research is needed to confirm if they're actually associated with colon cancer. The study authors also concluded that all the major genes that significantly increase the risk of colon cancer have been identified. "Our study is the largest ever conducted of the genetics of bowel [colon] cancer, and sets out a detailed map of the disease that could lead us to new ways of treating or preventing it," study leader Richard Houlston, a professor of molecular and population genetics at the Institute of Cancer Research in London, said in an institute news release. "The research closes one chapter in the study of bowel cancer, by ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Colonoscopy, Colorectal Cancer, Diagnosis and Investigation, Familial Adenomatous Polyposis

Expert Panel Reaffirms Need for Colon Cancer Screen Beginning at Age 50

Posted 15 Jun 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, June 15, 2016 – Reiterating a recommendation last made in 2008, an influential U.S. panel of health experts is advocating that regular colon cancer screening begin at age 50 and continue until at least age 75. However, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force stopped short of saying any one screening method was better than another. "There are multiple screening options for colorectal cancer that reduce the risk of dying from the disease. We encourage people to choose the best option for them, in consultation with their clinician," former Task Force member Dr. Douglas Owens said Wednesday in a USPSTF news release. The panel's reticence to choose one option over another may be at odds with the preference of many doctors, who often advise colonoscopy as the "gold standard" test. Dr. Arun Swaminath is one of them. "There is only one test – colonoscopy – that can both diagnose a ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Colonoscopy, Colorectal Cancer, Diagnosis and Investigation, Familial Adenomatous Polyposis

Colon Cancer Rising in People Under 50

Posted 24 May 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, May 24, 2016 – Although overall colon cancer rates are declining, the rates among Americans under 50 have jumped more than 11 percent in the past decade, a new study finds. Over the same decade, the number of cancers in those 50 and older fell by nearly 3 percent, the study found. "Our findings suggest that health care providers should be more vigilant about detecting symptoms in younger patients and also should consider lowering the threshold for colonoscopy screening," lead researcher Dr. Elie Sutton said during a media briefing. Sutton is a research fellow at Mount Sinai West Hospital in New York City. "We really don't know why colon cancer is increasing in younger patients," he said. "We can speculate that it's due to increases in inflammatory bowel disease or a change in diet, but really there is no clear consensus on that." The researchers also found that colon cancer ... Read more

Related support groups: Colonoscopy, Dietary Supplementation, Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation and Deficiency, Colorectal Cancer, Dietary Fiber Supplementation, Familial Adenomatous Polyposis

A Little Excess Weight May Boost Colon Cancer Survival

Posted 20 May 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, May 19, 2016 – In what may come as a bit of a surprise, a new study found that overweight colon cancer patients tended to have better survival than their normal-weight peers. "Overweight and obesity have been identified as risk factors for many health conditions, but for people with colorectal cancer, some extra weight may provide protection against mortality," said study lead author Candyce Kroenke. She's a research scientist at Kaiser Permanente Division of Research in Oakland, Calif. Still, one health expert cautioned that the finding is no license for people to pile on excess pounds. "This study should not be used to describe an 'upside' of being overweight with regard to cancer risk, since overweight people develop cancer at higher rates," said gastroenterologist Dr. Arun Swaminath of Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City. In the study, Kroenke's team examined the medical ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Weight Loss, Colorectal Cancer, Familial Adenomatous Polyposis

Tumor Location Affects Colon Cancer Survival: Study

Posted 19 May 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, May 18, 2016 – Your survival odds against colon cancer may depend on which side of your colon the tumor develops, new research contends. In a study of more than 1,000 men and women with colon cancer that had spread, those whose tumor was on the left side survived just over 33 months, while those whose tumor was on the right side survived only slightly more than 19 months. "It's a stunning and surprising finding, and the difference is dramatic," said lead researcher Dr. Alan Venook, a professor of medicine at the University of California, San Francisco. It appears that colon cancer that begins on the right side is different from colon cancer that begins on the left side, he said. "We thought of the colon as a tube that propelled stool out of the body, but it's not that simple," Venook said. "Each side of the colon starts in a different place, which is why the cancers are ... Read more

Related support groups: Colonoscopy, Colorectal Cancer, Avastin, Erbitux, Bevacizumab, Cetuximab, Familial Adenomatous Polyposis

Small Study Supports New Stool-Based Colon Cancer Test

Posted 19 Apr 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, April 19, 2016 – A new, but small, study finds more evidence that a recently approved, stool-based colon cancer test may be effective for certain patients. Still, experts who looked at the findings stressed that the test, called Cologuard, should never be used as a substitute for the "gold standard" colon cancer test, colonoscopy. Cologuard is a noninvasive stool DNA test that detects red blood cells and certain DNA mutations that are associated with colon cancer. The test was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in 2014. The new study included nearly 400 people at average risk for colon cancer, meaning they had no symptoms and no personal or family history of the disease or precancerous polyps. The patients had also not yet undergone more invasive screening procedures, such as colonoscopy. At one year of follow-up, 51 of the patients (about 15 percent) had a ... Read more

Related support groups: Colonoscopy, Colorectal Cancer, Diagnosis and Investigation, Familial Adenomatous Polyposis

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