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Don't Fret Delays in Treating Colon Cancer, Study Suggests

Posted 15 Nov 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 15, 2017 – Delays in colon cancer treatment may not increase the risk of death, according to a new study. Canadian researchers examined data from more than 900 people diagnosed with stage 1 to stage 3 colon cancer. Some began treatment within a month of diagnosis, and others started treatment either 30 to 59 days, 60 to 89 days, 90 to 119 days or more than four months after diagnosis. The average time between diagnosis and the start of treatment was 38 days. Delaying treatment had no effect on overall survival or on people remaining cancer-free, the researchers said. The study appears in the December issue of the journal Diseases of the Colon and Rectum. The researchers hope their findings "will result in discussion regarding the appropriateness of the existing recommendations regarding optimal wait time to surgery targets," said study author Dr. Kerollos Wanis, from ... Read more

Related support groups: Colonoscopy, Colorectal Cancer, Familial Adenomatous Polyposis

Study Untangles Disparity in Colon Cancer Survival Rates

Posted 15 Nov 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 15, 2017 – Health insurance and tumor characteristics are major reasons for the differences in colon cancer survival rates between blacks and whites in the United States, a new study finds. Researchers examined data from nearly 200,000 Americans with colon cancer, ages 18-64, and found that the five-year survival rate was 66.5 percent for whites and 57.3 percent for blacks – a difference of 9.2 percentage points. But when the researchers looked at people with similar insurance coverage, that difference was cut nearly in half, to 4.9 percentage points. When they matched tumor characteristics, the survival differences fell to 2.3 percentage points. The study was published online Nov. 13 in the journal Gastroenterology. "These findings reinforce the importance of equitable health insurance coverage to mitigate the survival disparity between black versus white [colon ... Read more

Related support groups: Colonoscopy, Colorectal Cancer, Diagnosis and Investigation, Familial Adenomatous Polyposis

Fiber-Rich Diet Boosts Survival From Colon Cancer

Posted 2 Nov 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Nov. 2, 2017 – A diet rich in fiber may lessen the chances of dying from colon cancer, a new study suggests. Among people treated for non-metastatic colon cancer, every 5 grams of fiber added to their diet reduced their odds of dying by nearly 25 percent, said lead researcher Dr. Andrew Chan. He is an associate professor in the department of medicine at Harvard Medical School. "What you eat after you've been diagnosed may make a difference," Chan said. "There is a possibility that increasing your intake of fiber may actually lower the rate of dying from colon cancer and maybe even other causes." Chan cautioned, however, that the study does not prove that the additional fiber caused people to live longer, only that the two were associated. Fiber has been linked to better insulin control and less inflammation, which may account for better survival, he suggested. In addition, a ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Multiple Sclerosis, Heart Disease, Colonoscopy, Diverticulitis, Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation and Deficiency, Colorectal Cancer, Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation during Pregnancy/Lactation, Dietary Fiber Supplementation, Familial Adenomatous Polyposis

Should Colon Cancer Screening Start at 45, not 50?

Posted 30 Oct 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Oct. 30, 2017 – Currently, people at average risk of colon cancer are told to start screening for the disease at age 50. But a new study raises the question of whether earlier screening could be better. Looking at more than 6,000 patients who underwent colonoscopies, French researchers found the rate of abnormal colon growths started to rise sharply at age 45. Among 45- to 49-year-old patients, 26 percent showed growths called adenomas – a type of polyp that could eventually become cancerous. That compared with 13 percent of patients ages 40 to 44. In addition, so-called "neoplastic" growths were found in nearly 4 percent of patients ages 45 to 49 – versus only 0.8 percent of people in their early 40s. A neoplasm refers to a new, uncontrolled growth of abnormal tissue, which can be cancerous or not. According to lead researcher Dr. David Karsenti, the preliminary findings ... Read more

Related support groups: Colonoscopy, Colorectal Cancer, Familial Adenomatous Polyposis

Here's the Recipe to Keep Colon Cancer at Bay

Posted 7 Sep 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Sept. 7, 2017 – For reducing colon cancer risk, whole grains and regular exercise are a must, while processed meats and alcohol should be limited, a large research review finds. Three servings (about 3 ounces) a day of whole grains – such as brown rice or whole-wheat bread – may lower colon cancer risk by 17 percent, according to a new report from the American Institute for Cancer Research and the World Cancer Research Fund International. And greater consumption of whole grains confers even more protection, said the researchers, who evaluated close to 100 studies. Among more than 29 million adult participants, about 250,000 had colon cancer. "The extensive review of the scientific literature revealed that colorectal cancer is largely preventable through a healthy diet and lifestyle," said report panel member Dr. Edward Giovannucci. "Maintaining a healthy body weight, ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Smoking, Smoking Cessation, Colonoscopy, Alcohol Dependence, Colorectal Cancer, Hangover, Acute Alcohol Intoxication, Familial Adenomatous Polyposis

Deaths From Colon Cancer Up Among Younger White Americans

Posted 8 Aug 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Aug. 8, 2017 – Colon cancer is claiming the lives of more younger, white Americans, a troubling new report shows. "It's quite perplexing. It's not understood why this is happening, and that makes it even more concerning," said lead author Rebecca Siegel, strategic director of surveillance information services for the American Cancer Society. Also alarming is that this hike in colon cancer incidence and deaths doesn't seem to be the result of more colon cancer screening. "It's probably a real increase among young people," Siegel noted. An examination of trends from 1970 through 2014 found the uptick most pronounced for aggressive cancer that spreads from the colon to other body organs. "What's disturbing is that colon cancer is detectable and curable when detected early," said Dr. Darrell Gray, of the Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center. Because colon cancer is ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Colonoscopy, Colorectal Cancer, Diagnosis and Investigation, Familial Adenomatous Polyposis

$100 Sweetens the Pot for a Colonoscopy

Posted 25 Jul 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, July 25, 2017 – It appears that $100 might go a long way toward convincing someone to get a colonoscopy. New research found that such a cash incentive doubled the chances that older adults were screened for colon cancer. "Colonoscopy is challenging for patients, requiring a day off from work, a bowel-cleansing preparation, and transportation, in addition to non-financial costs of anxiety and discomfort," said study author Dr. Shivan Mehta. He's an assistant professor of medicine at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia. "The improvement we saw in the rate of screening colonoscopies was statistically significant, and shows for the first time that a financial incentive can at least modestly boost that rate," Mehta added in a university news release. Colon cancer kills more than 50,000 people in the United States every year, second only to lung cancer. But most potential ... Read more

Related support groups: Colonoscopy, Colorectal Cancer, Diagnosis and Investigation, Body Imaging, Familial Adenomatous Polyposis

Obesity in Teen Years Tied to Colon Cancer Risk in Adulthood

Posted 24 Jul 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, July 24, 2017 – Obesity even in adolescence may raise the odds for colon cancer in adulthood, a large new study finds. Overweight and obese teens in Israel had about a 53 percent higher risk for colon cancer as adults, researchers found. And for rectal cancer, obesity – but not overweight --was tied to more than double the risk for girls, and 71 percent higher odds for boys, compared to normal-weight teens. "This study is additional evidence that risk factors for colon cancer operate through the life course," said Dr. Andrew Chan, an associate professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School. The findings "highlight the importance of maintaining a healthy body weight even in childhood," added Chan, who wasn't involved in the study. According to the American Cancer Society, colon cancer is the third most common cancer diagnosis in U.S. men and women, excluding skin cancer. About ... Read more

Related support groups: Diabetes, Type 2, Obesity, Osteoarthritis, Colorectal Cancer, Pre-Diabetes, Diabetes Mellitus, Diagnosis and Investigation, Familial Adenomatous Polyposis, Abnormal Glucose Tolerance

Easier Colon Exam Boosts Screening, But Insurers May Not Pay

Posted 11 Jul 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, July 11, 2017 – People with insurance that covers virtual colonoscopy are nearly 50 percent more likely to get screened for colon cancer, a new study shows. Like traditional colonoscopy, the newer, virtual test can detect precancerous polyps and cancer, but it's less invasive. It uses CT technology to see inside the colon. The American Cancer Society recommends so-called CT colonography as one way to screen people for colon cancer starting at age 50, but not all insurance companies cover it. Only about two-thirds of people who should be screened for colon cancer actually get tested, said the study's lead author, Dr. Maureen Smith. She is a professor in the University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Medicine and Public Health. "CT colonography is a newer technology that can detect both pre-cancer and cancer, but because it's relatively new it isn't widely covered by insurance ... Read more

Related support groups: Colonoscopy, Colorectal Cancer, Diagnosis and Investigation, Body Imaging, Familial Adenomatous Polyposis

Blacks More Prone to Colon Cancers That Arise Between Colonoscopies: Study

Posted 23 May 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, May 22, 2017 – Colon cancer guidelines now recommend a colonoscopy every 10 years, beginning at age 50 for people at average risk for the disease. But a new study finds that older black Americans are far more likely than whites to develop a colon cancer in the decade-long gap between these screenings. Some of this may be due to where black patients receive their colonoscopy, the researchers said. "Blacks and other minorities more frequently received colonoscopies from physicians with lower [colon] polyp detection rates, suggesting there was lower quality of care," said study lead author Stacey Fedewa, a researcher with the American Cancer Society. Speaking in society news release, she said the findings "are consistent with previous reports that blacks were more likely to receive health care from physicians in lower resource settings." In the study, Fedewa's team tracked data ... Read more

Related support groups: Colonoscopy, Colorectal Cancer, Familial Adenomatous Polyposis

Overweight Boys Face Higher Colon Cancer Risk as Adults

Posted 21 May 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, May 19, 2017 – Overweight boys may be more likely to develop colon cancer later in life, but losing weight might lower that risk, Danish researchers say. Although earlier studies have suggested that overweight children run a higher risk of being diagnosed with colon cancer as adults, it had been less clear what effect weight loss might have on this risk. "These results highlight the importance of weight management in childhood," Britt Wang Jensen, of Bispebjerg and Frederiksberg Hospital in Copenhagen, and colleagues reported. Excluding skin cancers, colon cancer is the third leading cancer diagnosed in both men and women in the United States, according to the American Cancer Society. More than 95,000 new cases of colon cancer and almost 40,000 new cases of rectal cancer will be detected in 2017, the cancer society added. In the new study, the researchers examined the health ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Colorectal Cancer, Diagnosis and Investigation, Familial Adenomatous Polyposis

HPV Vaccine May Also Prevent Cancers Affecting Men

Posted 18 May 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, May 18, 2017 – The same vaccine that cuts the risk of cervical cancer in women might also lower the chances of head and neck cancers in men, new research suggests. In addition to being linked to cervical cancer, the human papillomavirus (HPV) can cause cancers in the back of the throat, in an area known as the oropharynx. HPV is linked with about 70 percent of these types of cancers in the United States, and the rates of these cancers are rising dramatically, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved HPV vaccines for prevention of cervical, vulvar, vaginal and anal cancers in women, and anal cancers in men. However, the HPV vaccine hasn't been FDA-approved for prevention of head and neck cancers, because the vaccines have not been evaluated in clinical trials for that purpose. "We don't know if there's ... Read more

Related support groups: Colorectal Cancer, Gardasil, Cervical Cancer, Head and Neck Cancer, Human Papillomavirus Vaccine, Human Papillomavirus Prophylaxis, Cervarix, Vaccination and Prophlaxis, Familial Adenomatous Polyposis, Gardasil 9

Nuts! Good Medicine for Colon Cancer Survivors?

Posted 18 May 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, May 17, 2017 – Colon cancer patients might improve their chances of survival if they eat nuts along with an overall healthy diet and regular exercise, two new studies report. In a seven-year study, patients successfully treated for stage 3 colon cancer who ate at least 2 ounces of nuts a week had a 42 percent lower chance of their cancer coming back and a 57 percent lower risk of dying from the disease. Stage 3 means the cancer may have spread to surrounding tissues, but hasn't spread to distant organs. These preliminary findings jibe with those of a second trial. That study found that colon cancer survivors with the highest healthy lifestyle scores – eating right, exercising and maintaining a healthy weight – had a 42 percent lower risk of death than those with the lowest scores. Both studies are scheduled for presentation next month at the annual meeting of the American ... Read more

Related support groups: Colonoscopy, Colorectal Cancer, Familial Adenomatous Polyposis

Get Ready for Your 'Capsule Robot' Colon Cancer Check

Posted 8 May 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, May 8, 2017 – Not looking forward to your next colonoscopy? Don't worry – in the future, a tiny capsule less than an inch long may navigate your colon to check for cancer risk, scientists report. Researchers at Nashville's Vanderbilt University Medical Center used magnets to guide the tethered "capsule robot" through a pig's colon. "Not only is the capsule robot able to actively maneuver through the GI tract to perform diagnostics, it is also able to perform therapeutic maneuvers, such as biopsies of tissue or polyp removal, due to the tether – something that other capsule devices are unable to do," lead researcher Dr. Keith Obstein explained. His team said the magnetized capsule robot is 0.7 inches long and inserted rectally. It's then guided through the colon by using an external magnet that's attached to a robotic arm. The capsule also has an attached tether that is much ... Read more

Related support groups: Colonoscopy, Colorectal Cancer, Familial Adenomatous Polyposis

Delay a Needed Colonoscopy at Your Own Risk

Posted 25 Apr 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, April 25, 2017 – People who wait too long to get a colonoscopy after a "positive" screening test for colon cancer may face a heightened risk of the disease, a new study finds. The study asked a fundamental question: If a stool test suggests someone might have cancer, how long can someone safely wait to have a colonoscopy? Colonoscopy is a procedure that uses a thin, flexible tube with a camera on the end to allow your doctor to see inside your colon. The study found that some delay appeared to cause no harm. People who had a follow-up colonoscopy within 10 months faced no greater risk of colon cancer than those who had their colonoscopy within one month. But when the wait was longer, the cancer risk rose. After 10 months, the risk of colon cancer was roughly 50 percent to two times greater. And the odds of being diagnosed with advanced-stage cancer were two to three times ... Read more

Related support groups: Colonoscopy, Colorectal Cancer, Diagnosis and Investigation, Familial Adenomatous Polyposis

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