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Facial Lipoatrophy News

Related terms: Facial Fat Loss, Facial Wasting, Lipoatrophy, Facial

CDC Warns of Dangers of Plastic Surgery in Dominican Republic

Posted 14 Jul 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, July 14, 2016 – U.S. health officials are warning about the dangers of "medical tourism" after at least 18 women from the East Coast became infected with a disfiguring bacteria following plastic surgery procedures they had in the Dominican Republic. The infections, caused by a type of germ called mycobacteria, can be difficult to treat. At least several of the women had to be hospitalized, undergo surgery to treat the infection and take antibiotics for months, according to the report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. One expert said the effects can be devastating. "It's a very mutilating infection. They're going for cosmetic surgery, and they will be scarred. It's a terrible scenario for people to go down there, get surgery and come back worse than they imagined they could be," said Dr. Charles Daley. He is a Denver infectious disease physician whose ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Facial Wrinkles, Facial Lipoatrophy, Orbicularis Oculi, Lip Augmentation

New 'Second Skin' Temporarily Smoothes Wrinkles

Posted 9 May 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, May 9, 2016 – MIT researchers may have discovered a fountain of youth for skin – at least a very temporary one. The researchers have developed a "second skin" that could be used to smooth wrinkles, protect skin from damage, or administer medications to treat skin conditions, such as eczema. But, right now, the product only does its job for about a day. "It's an invisible layer that can provide a barrier, provide cosmetic improvement, and potentially deliver a drug locally to the area that's being treated," Daniel Anderson said in a university news release. He is an associate professor in MIT's department of chemical engineering. "Those three things together could really make it ideal for use in humans," Anderson added. As people age, their skin becomes less elastic and firm, the study authors noted. These signs of aging may be worsened by sun damage. For the past decade, the ... Read more

Related support groups: Facial Wrinkles, Diagnosis and Investigation, Facial Lipoatrophy, Orbicularis Oculi

Americans Embraced Record Number of Lip Procedures in 2015

Posted 18 Apr 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, April 18, 2016 – Hoping to look more kissable perhaps, Americans underwent a record number of lip procedures last year. "We live in the age of the selfie, and because we see images of ourselves almost constantly on social media, we're much more aware of how our lips look," Dr. David Song, president of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons, said in a society news release. There were more than 27,400 lip implants performed in 2015 – a 48 percent increase since 2000. That averages out to one lip implant every 19 minutes, the society said, noting the procedure became more popular among both men and women. Lip injections, which include Botox and various soft-tissue fillers, also rose steeply last year, reaching nearly 9.2 million. That's an increase of more than 1,000 percent since the year 2000, the plastic surgeons said. Lip procedures have been the second-fastest-growing ... Read more

Related support groups: Botox, Facial Wrinkles, Facial Lipoatrophy, Myobloc, Botulinum Toxin Type B, Orbicularis Oculi, Lip Augmentation

More Americans Opting for Butt Implants, Lifts

Posted 27 Feb 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Feb. 26, 2016 – More Americans are putting their backsides to the front of the line when it comes to plastic surgery, a new report finds. Butt implants and lifts are now the fastest-growing types of plastic surgery in the United States, according to the latest data from the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS). The 2015 statistics also revealed another sign that men are not immune to vanity: More than 40 percent of breast reductions are now performed on males, the ASPS report found. Last year, more than 27,000 breast reduction surgeries were performed on men – 5 percent more than in 2014 and 35 percent more than in 2000. "As plastic surgery is becoming more common and accepted in men, we're seeing more of them undergo procedures to tighten and tone problem areas, like the breasts," ASPS president Dr. David Song said in a society news release. "This procedure is often ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Facial Wrinkles, Vascular Surgery, Facial Lipoatrophy, Lip Augmentation, Orbicularis Oculi

Face-lifts Seem to Do Little to Boost Self-Esteem: Study

Posted 29 Oct 2015 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Oct. 29, 2015 – Face-lifts may smooth away years from a person's appearance, but they seem to do little to boost self-esteem, new research suggests. In the small study, the researchers looked at what 50 patients – almost all of them women – said about their own sense of self-esteem, both immediately before plastic surgery and six months later. "The findings of the study are not surprising," said lead author Dr. Andrew Jacono, a board certified plastic surgeon with the New York Center for Facial Plastic and Laser Surgery in New York City. "Because as I see it, self-esteem is much more complex than someone's appearance. It's rooted in a long developmental process that starts in childhood. So, to assume that what has taken a lifetime of work to develop could be changed by one simple operation is silly." Jacono and his colleagues reported their findings online Oct. 29 in the ... Read more

Related support groups: Facial Wrinkles, Photoaging of the Skin, Facial Lipoatrophy, Dermatoheliosis, Lip Augmentation

Why Skin Wrinkles More Around the Eyes

Posted 17 Jul 2015 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, July 17, 2015 – Facial wrinkles – such as so-called "laugh lines" or "crow's feet" – are the bane of many aging adults. Now, new research on cadavers may offer some insight into why some skin creases are more pronounced than others. Differences in oil-secreting glands just below the skin may help explain why forehead wrinkles are shallower than wrinkles around the outer eye, according to a research team led by Yuichi Tamatsu, of Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences in Japan. Sebaceous glands are "microscopic glands that secrete sebum, an oily or waxy material, which lubricates the skin and protects it from water damage," said Dr. Nitin Chauhan, a facial plastic and reconstructive surgeon and otolaryngologist at the University of Toronto. Chauhan, who was not part of the new research, said that based on the study findings, it appears that ... Read more

Related support groups: Facial Wrinkles, Photoaging of the Skin, Facial Lipoatrophy, Dermatoheliosis, Botulinum Toxin Type B, Myobloc, Orbicularis Oculi

Lip Injections May Ease Challenges of Facial Paralysis

Posted 18 Jun 2015 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, June 18, 2015 – People with facial paralysis may benefit from cosmetic lip surgery, a preliminary study finds. Facial paralysis is "a very large problem that can occur because of stroke, Bell's palsy, muscular dystrophy, trauma and birth defects," Dr. Kofi Boahene, a facial plastic and reconstructive surgeon at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore, said in a university news release. Poor lip control caused by facial paralysis can cause drooling, spillage of food and drink, and difficulty making sounds that require fully closing the lips, such as the letters "b" and "p." Many of these people are also self-conscious about their appearance, Boahene said. He and his colleagues worked with 22 people who had facial paralysis on one side of the mouth and three people with muscular dystrophy who had lost control of both sides of the mouth. The patients were given ... Read more

Related support groups: Ischemic Stroke, Muscular Dystrophy, Cerebral Palsy, Intracranial Hemorrhage, Paralytic Disorder, Facial Lipoatrophy

FDA Warns of Complications From Facial Fillers

Posted 29 May 2015 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, May 29, 2015 – Soft tissue fillers used in cosmetic procedures can accidentally be injected into blood vessels in the face and cause serious harm, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration warns. The fillers are approved to treat wrinkles or to enhance cheeks or lips. Injection of facial fillers into blood vessels can cause blockages that restrict blood supply to tissues. Filler material injected into blood vessels can also travel to other areas and cause stroke, vision problems, blindness and damage and/or death of the skin and underlying facial structures, the agency said in a news release. Accidental injections of facial filler into blood vessels can occur anywhere on the face. But an FDA analysis of studies and reported problems found it was most likely to occur between the eyebrows and nose, in and around the nose, on the forehead, and around the eyes, the agency said. The FDA ... Read more

Related support groups: Facial Wrinkles, Facial Lipoatrophy

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Facial Wrinkles

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Sculptra, Radiesse, Belotero Balance, Sculptra Aesthetic, poly-l-lactic acid, dermal filler