Skip to Content

Join the 'Diarrhea, Acute' group to help and get support from people like you.

Diarrhea, Acute News

Related terms: Diarrhea, drug-induced

Health Tip: Get the Facts About Antibiotics

Posted 10 days ago by Drugs.com

-- Antibiotics aren't always what you or your child needs to get well. The American Academy of Pediatrics explains: An antibiotic will not help the common cold, which is caused by a virus. Antibiotics only treat bacterial infections, not those caused by viruses or other germs. Overuse of an antibiotic could lead to bacteria that becomes resistant to that medication. That's why an antibiotic should never be used unless necessary. An antibiotic could cause mild side effects, such as diarrhea. Green or yellow mucus can signal a viral infection or a bacterial infection. Symptoms lasting longer than 10 days accompanied by fever may mean a bacterial infection. Not all ear infections need an antibiotic. Many will go away without treatment. Ask your doctor about this. Most sore throats are caused by a virus, but strep throat does need an antibiotic. An antibiotic usually starts working within ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Diarrhea, Bacterial Infection, Otitis Media, Sore Throat, Viral Infection, Diarrhea, Acute

The Scoop About Healthy Poop

Posted 25 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Oct. 25, 2016 – Your bowel movements can offer important clues about your health, a doctor says. If bowel movements feel comfortable, then it's likely all is well, said Dr. Gabriel Neal, a family medicine doctor and clinical assistant professor at Texas A&M College of Medicine. "Normal bowel movements are relatively soft but dense. They should be any shade of brown or green," Neal said in a college news release. Viruses and bacteria in the intestinal tract can cause stool discoloration, diarrhea or blood in the stool. The color of the blood can help your doctor pinpoint the location of the infection. "If an infection is in the lower intestines or colon, then the blood in your stool is going to be red. If you find black blood, then the blood has oxidized and is from higher up in your digestive tract, such as the stomach or upper intestines," Neal said. People with gallbladder ... Read more

Related support groups: Diarrhea, Constipation, Crohn's Disease, Constipation - Chronic, Gastrointestinal Disorders, Gallbladder Disease, Inflammatory Bowel Disease, Constipation - Acute, Diarrhea, Chronic, Diarrhea, Acute, Infectious Diarrhea

Connecticut Toddler Latest U.S. Case of 'Superbug'

Posted 11 Sep 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Sept. 9, 2016 – Scientists have identified a new patient who carried a type of bacteria that is resistant to an antibiotic of last resort, bringing the number of cases reported in the United States to four. All of the patients had E. coli with a gene called mcr-1, which makes the bacteria resistant to the antibiotic colistin, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The latest case, a 2-year-old Connecticut girl, was diagnosed in June after she returned from a trip to the Caribbean, said senior researcher Maroya Spalding Walters, a CDC epidemiologist. "The girl had an illness that caused diarrhea, which began in mid-June while she was traveling overseas. Her diarrhea was not caused by the bacteria that had the mcr-1 gene – the cause has not been definitively diagnosed," she said. Although the mcr-1 gene was found, it wasn't producing toxins. When the ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Diarrhea, Bacterial Infection, Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus Infection, Diarrhea, Acute, Infectious Diarrhea

Addicts Using Diarrhea Drug Imodium to Get High

Posted 5 May 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, May 5, 2016 – Searching for an alternative to opioid painkillers such as Oxycontin and Vicodin, some addicts are now turning to the diarrhea drug Imodium for a high, researchers say. This abuse of Imodium – with its key ingredient, loperamide – is a growing problem in the United States, according to the researchers. "People looking for either self-treatment of [opioid] withdrawal symptoms or euphoria are overdosing on loperamide with sometimes deadly consequences," said study author William Eggleston. "Loperamide is safe in therapeutic doses but extremely dangerous in high doses," Eggleston said in a news release from the Annals of Emergency Medicine. His team published its findings – case reports involving two patients – in the April 29 online edition of the journal. The two individuals each took massive doses of loperamide. Both overdosed and even though they received ... Read more

Related support groups: OxyContin, Vicodin, Opiate Dependence, Diarrhea, Drug Dependence, Imodium, Diarrhea, Chronic, Loperamide, Toxic Reactions Incl Drug and Substance Abuse, Diarrhea, Acute, Anti-Diarrheal, Imodium A-D, Imotil, Kaopectate 1-D, Kaopectate Caplet, Pepto Diarrhea Control, Diar-Aid, Loperamide/Simethicone, Neo-Diaral, Kao-Paverin

Health Tip: Taking an Antidiarrheal Drug?

Posted 3 Feb 2016 by Drugs.com

-- An over-the-counter antidiarrheal drug can help clear a bout of diarrhea, but it's important to take the medication properly. The Academy of Family Physicians suggests: Following the label's instructions on how often to take the medication, and how much to take. Calling your doctor or pharmacist if you have any questions or are taking other medications. Taking no more than the suggested maximum. More medication does not work more effectively or quickly. Using only one antidiarrheal medication at a time, unless directed by your doctor. Read more

Related support groups: Diarrhea, Imodium, Lomotil, Diarrhea, Chronic, Loperamide, Diarrhea, Acute, Anti-Diarrheal, Lonox, Infectious Diarrhea, Imodium A-D, Atropine/Diphenoxylate, Campylobacter Gastroenteritis, Salmonella Gastroenteritis, Pepto Diarrhea Control, Post Cholecystectomy Diarrhea, Imotil, Kaopectate Caplet, Lomocot, Neo-Diaral, Diar-Aid

Preventable Ills Cause Nearly 8 Million Childhood Deaths Globally

Posted 25 Jan 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Jan. 25, 2016 – Most of the nearly 8 million deaths of children and teens around the world in 2013 were avoidable, a new report says. More than 6 million children younger than 5 lost their lives because of treatable conditions like malaria, diarrhea and respiratory tract infections, according to pediatric researchers who've analyzed results of the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013. "The vast majority of deaths in children and adolescents are preventable," said the authors from the Global Burden of Disease Pediatrics Collaboration. "Proven interventions exist to prevent diarrheal and respiratory diseases, neonatal conditions, iron deficiency anemia and road injuries, which result in some of the highest burdens of unnecessary death and disability among children and adolescents." For the study, the researchers from around the world used data from a variety of sources to target ... Read more

Related support groups: Diarrhea, Upper Respiratory Tract Infection, Malaria, Diarrhea, Chronic, Malaria Prevention, Diarrhea, Acute, Malaria Prophylaxis, Infectious Diarrhea, Salmonella Enteric Fever, Campylobacter Gastroenteritis, Salmonella Gastroenteritis

Frozen as Good as Fresh for Fecal Transplant: Study

Posted 12 Jan 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Jan. 12, 2016 – Researchers say they have verified the effectiveness of a quicker way to rid people of recurring C. difficile bacterial infection. A new clinical trial has shown that frozen stool samples work just as well as freshly donated samples when treating a tough C. difficile infection through a procedure called fecal transplantation. Doctors have used frozen stool samples to treat C. difficile for a couple of years, because the prepackaged samples allow for much easier and swifter treatment than identifying and screening a fresh donor, said lead author Dr. Christine Lee, director of the microbiology residency program at McMaster University in Ontario, Canada. "Donor screening can take one to two weeks," Lee said. "If a person requires fecal transplant right away, then that's not possible." The clinical trial showed that patients do not pay a price for the convenience ... Read more

Related support groups: Diarrhea, Gastrointestinal Disorders, Bowel Preparation, Diarrhea, Chronic, Clostridial Infection, Diagnosis and Investigation, Diarrhea, Acute, Fecal Incontinence

Health Tip: Should I Talk to my Doctor About Gas?

Posted 10 Aug 2015 by Drugs.com

-- While everyone has intestinal gas, some people have severe bloating that causes discomfort and other problems. The Mayo Clinic mentions these warning signs that you may need to see a doctor: Intestinal gas that is persistent and severe. Intestinal gas that occurs with vomiting. Long-term diarrhea, bloody stool or constipation. Weight loss for no apparent reason. Heartburn. Read more

Related support groups: GERD, Diarrhea, Constipation, Gas, Weight Loss, Abdominal Distension, Colitis, Indigestion, Constipation - Chronic, Hemorrhoids, Gastrointestinal Disorders, Inflammatory Bowel Disease, Duodenitis/Gastritis, Constipation - Acute, Diarrhea, Chronic, Anal Fissure and Fistula, Diarrhea, Acute, Infectious Diarrhea, Functional Gastric Disorder, Acute Abdomen

Many Doctors Work While Sick, Survey Shows

Posted 6 Jul 2015 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, July 6, 2015 – Many health care professionals work when they are sick, putting their patients at risk for serious illness or even death, new research suggests. The danger is greatest for patients with weakened immune systems, and the study authors noted that these practices also increase health care costs. Since the consequences of these types of infections can be significant, the researchers wanted to know why health care professionals didn't stay home when they were ill. So, they surveyed doctors, nurse practitioners, physician assistants, nurse anesthetists and midwives. A team of researchers, led by Julia Szymczak of the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, received anonymous responses from more than 500 health care professionals. The vast majority of those surveyed (95 percent) believed that working while sick put their patients at risk. Still, 83 percent admitted to ... Read more

Related support groups: Diarrhea, Fever, Sinusitis, Tonsillitis/Pharyngitis, Cold Symptoms, Upper Respiratory Tract Infection, Sinus Symptoms, Diarrhea, Acute, Infectious Diarrhea, Epiglottitis

Health Tip: Swimming Pools Can Harbor Germs

Posted 18 May 2015 by Drugs.com

-- While most swimming pools contain chemicals to help kill germs, these germ-destroyers may not be 100 percent effective all the time. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends: Shower to help rinse off germs before you get into the water. Never urinate or pass a bowel movement in swimming water. If you have diarrhea, don't go swimming. Never drink pool water. Every hour, have kids get out of the pool for a bathroom break or diaper change. Make sure chlorine and pH levels are safe before anyone gets in the water. Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Diarrhea, Diarrhea, Chronic, Diarrhea, Acute, Infectious Diarrhea

FDA Warns Against Use of Diarrhea Drug From El Salvador

Posted 19 Sep 2012 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 19 – Consumers should not use a drug product called Intestinomicina – marketed as a treatment for infectious diarrhea and acute gastrointestinal infections – because it contains an ingredient that can cause serious and potentially deadly problems, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration warns. People who bought Intestinomicina should immediately stop taking it and consult with a health care provider, the FDA said in a safety alert issued Tuesday. Intestinomicina, which is made in El Salvador, contains a prescription drug ingredient called chloramphenicol. Earlier this year, in July, oral forms of chloramphenicol were taken off the U.S. market due to the risk of serious health problems. The most dangerous threat associated with oral chloramphenicol is bone marrow toxicity, which occurs when the body does not produce enough red blood cells, white blood cells and/or ... Read more

Related support groups: Diarrhea, Chloramphenicol, Diarrhea, Acute, Infectious Diarrhea, Chloromycetin, Chloracol

Health Tip: Some Shouldn't Take Antidiarrheal Drugs

Posted 18 Oct 2010 by Drugs.com

-- Loperamide and bismuth subsalicylate are over-the-counter drugs designed to help people with diarrhea feel better. The American Academy of Family Physicians says while they're safe for most people, not everyone should take these medicines. Among those who should avoid the drugs: Children aged 6 or younger should avoid loperamide; 12 or younger should avoid bismuth subsalicylate. Anyone with a fever, bloody or black stools, or prior allergic reaction to the drug should avoid loperamide. Anyone who has an allergy to aspirin or salicylate medications should avoid bismuth subsalicylate. Anyone aged 12 to 18 who could have the chickenpox or flu also should avoid bismuth subsalicylate. Read more

Related support groups: Diarrhea, Imodium, Pepto-Bismol, Diarrhea, Chronic, Loperamide, Kaopectate, Diarrhea, Acute, Anti-Diarrheal, Infectious Diarrhea, Salmonella Enteric Fever, Imodium A-D, Bismuth Subsalicylate, Campylobacter Gastroenteritis, Childrens Kaopectate, Kaopectate Extra Strength, Salmonella Gastroenteritis, Pink Bismuth, Kaopectate Caplet, Diar-Aid, Kapectolin (New Formula)

What You Need to Know When Your Stomach Aches

Posted 28 Mar 2009 by Drugs.com

SATURDAY, March 28 – If your tummy feels funny, it could be a one-time bellyache, but it also could be a sign of something more serious. Dr. C. Richard Boland, chief of gastroenterology at Baylor University Medical Center in Dallas, says that everyone should know five things about serious digestive disorders: Symptoms: Alert your doctor if you have persistent symptoms, such as abdominal pain or discomfort, nausea, bloating, constipation, diarrhea, heartburn or blood in the stools. Diagnosis: Because many digestive disorders are not detectable with blood or imaging tests, they can be difficult to diagnosis. Irritable bowel syndrome, for instance, is usually diagnosed by first ruling out all other disorders. Talking to your doctor: Symptoms and your health history play a major role in diagnosing digestive disorders, so be frank with your doctor. Recording your eating habits and symptoms ... Read more

Related support groups: Nausea/Vomiting, Diarrhea, Constipation, Indigestion, Constipation - Chronic, Constipation - Acute, Diarrhea, Chronic, Diarrhea, Acute

Ask a Question

Further Information

Related Condition Support Groups

Infectious Diarrhea, Diarrhea

Related Drug Support Groups

Imodium, loperamide, Anti-Diarrheal, Imodium A-D, bilberry, Neo-Diaral, Kaopectate 1-D, Diamode, Kaopectate II, view more... Imotil, Motofen, loperamide / simethicone, Pepto Diarrhea Control, atropine / difenoxin, Kao-Paverin, Diar-Aid