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Derma-Smoothe / FS (Scalp) News

Newer Eczema Treatments Offer Relief

Posted 27 Oct 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Oct. 27, 2017 – Children and adults with eczema shouldn't suffer in silence because new, improved treatments can do more to help ease the uncomfortable, itchy rash associated with the skin condition. Many adults diagnosed with eczema (atopic dermatitis) actually had the condition since they were children but were never diagnosed, explained Dr. Luz Fonacier. She is an allergist in Mineola, N.Y., and an American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI) board member. "Atopic dermatitis is underdiagnosed in the United States," Fonacier said in an ACAAI news release. "Many adults don't seek out medical care, preferring to self-treat instead, either with home remedies or over-the-counter drugs. Often, they aren't aware they have eczema, and they also don't know treatments have changed a lot in the last few years. There are new drugs and topical medications that can make a ... Read more

Related support groups: Skin Rash, Eczema, Dermatitis, Clobetasol, Contact Dermatitis, Fluocinonide, Atopic Dermatitis, Desonide, Clobex, Kenalog, Desoximetasone, Elocon, Topicort, Perioral Dermatitis, Eucrisa, Dermatitis Herpetiformis, Dupixent, Betamethasone/Clotrimazole, Lidex, Nystatin/Triamcinolone

Black Children Missing Out on Eczema Treatment

Posted 13 Oct 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Oct. 13, 2017 – Black children may have more severe eczema than white children, but they are less likely to visit a doctor for this common inflammatory skin condition, new research shows. Eczema causes the skin to become red and itchy. Roughly 11 percent of children in the United States are affected by the condition, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. "Previous studies have demonstrated disparities in overall health care utilization among racial and ethnic minorities, but few studies have examined this question specifically for eczema," said senior study author Dr. Junko Takeshita. She is an assistant professor of dermatology and epidemiology at the University of Pennsylvania's Perelman School of Medicine. "This is the first study to look at racial and ethnic differences in health care utilization for eczema on an individual level rather than ... Read more

Related support groups: Skin Rash, Eczema, Dermatitis, Clobetasol, Contact Dermatitis, Fluocinonide, Atopic Dermatitis, Desonide, Clobex, Kenalog, Fleet, Desoximetasone, Elocon, Biafine, Skin Care, Aquaphor, Topicort, Vaseline, Aveeno, Dermatitis Herpetiformis

Eczema Can Take a Toll on Adults

Posted 27 Jul 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, July 27, 2017 – The itchy, rashy skin condition eczema sometimes takes a heavier toll on adults than children, an expert says. "Adult eczema patients may have dealt with their symptoms for their entire lives, which can be draining, or they may experience symptoms for the first time as adults, which can be a difficult adjustment," said Dr. Jonathan Silverberg, an assistant professor at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago. "Either way, this condition can take a real toll on them," added Silverberg, director of Northwestern's Multidisciplinary Eczema Center. Some people mistakenly regard eczema as a childhood disease and not a serious health problem for adults, he said. "People who aren't familiar with the disease might say, 'It's just eczema.' But for many patients, it's not 'just eczema.' It can be debilitating," Silverberg said in a news release ... Read more

Related support groups: Eczema, Dermatitis, Clobetasol, Contact Dermatitis, Fluocinonide, Atopic Dermatitis, Desonide, Clobex, Kenalog, Desoximetasone, Elocon, Topicort, Dermatitis Herpetiformis, Lidex, Vanos, Halog, Halobetasol, Cordran, Locoid, Olux

4 Ways to Protect Yourself Against Poison Ivy, Oak and Sumac

Posted 11 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Aug. 11, 2016 – When you're enjoying the great outdoors, be on the lookout for poison ivy, poison oak and poison sumac. The urushiol oil in their sap can cause itching, a red rash and blisters. These symptoms can appear from a few hours to several days after exposure, according to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Learn what these plants look like so you can avoid them. The old saying "Leaves of three, let it be" is a helpful reminder for poison ivy and poison oak. But it's not foolproof – the form may vary depending on the type of plant you encounter. Poison sumac, meanwhile, usually has clusters of 7 to 13 leaves, according to the U.S. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. If you're working in areas with these plants, wear long sleeves, long pants tucked into boots and impermeable gloves. Wash garden tools and gloves regularly. Wash pets if they may ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Benadryl, Hydroxyzine, Zyrtec, Promethazine, Claritin, Loratadine, Allegra, Diphenhydramine, Phenergan, Vistaril, Cetirizine, Clobetasol, Cyproheptadine, Atarax, Fluocinonide, Fexofenadine, Xyzal, Periactin

Retail Prices of Dermatology Drugs Skyrocket

Posted 25 Nov 2015 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 25, 2015 – Patients using prescription creams, gels, sprays and pills for skin conditions may shell out substantially more at the pharmacy than they did just six years ago, a new study suggests. Between 2009 and 2015, retail prices of brand-name dermatologic drugs rose 401 percent, on average, study authors reported Nov. 25 in JAMA Dermatology. Even generics have succumbed to price inflation, up 279 percent between 2011 and 2014, based on the drugs surveyed. Price increases for skin treatments far outpaced the general inflation rate of 11 percent during the six-year study period, the researchers said. "Cancer drugs were the worst in terms of the numbers" – up 1,240 percent or nearly $11,000 over the six-year study period – primarily because of two medicines, said Dr. Steven Rosenberg, voluntary professor of dermatology at the University of Miami Miller School of ... Read more

Related support groups: Monistat, RID, Monistat 3, Eczema, Monistat 7, Voltaren Gel, Dermatitis, Clobetasol, Contact Dermatitis, Therapeutic, Mupirocin, Drysol, Basal Cell Carcinoma, Epiduo, Sulfur, Efudex, Maintain, Bactroban, Retin-A, Silver

Health Tip: Coping With Mosquito Bites

Posted 1 Sep 2015 by Drugs.com

-- Mosquito bites are itchy and annoying, and tough to ignore when they're virtually screaming "scratch me!" The Mayo Clinic recommends: applying calamine lotion, using hydrocortisone cream, applying an ice pack or cold compress, combating a more significant allergic reaction by taking an oral, over-the-counter antihistamine. Read more

Related support groups: Clobetasol, Fluocinonide, Desonide, Clobex, Kenalog, Desoximetasone, Calamine, Elocon, Topicort, Insect Bites, Lidex, Cloderm, Olux, Vanos, Halog, Cordran, Caladryl, Locoid, Halobetasol, Betnovate

Got a Rash? You Might Be Allergic to Nickel, Dermatologist Says

Posted 20 Aug 2015 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Aug. 20, 2015 – Nickel is one of the most common causes of a skin rash that occurs due to contact with an allergen, a dermatologist says. This type of rash, allergic contact dermatitis, can be caused by nickel in jewelry, a patient's diet, nickel in a medical implant or nickel in a medication that's applied to the skin, said Dr. Jennifer Chen, a clinical assistant professor of dermatology at Stanford Hospital and Clinics, in Stanford, Calif. Typically, an allergic reaction to this metal occurs in an area of skin that comes into contact with an item such as a necklace, belt buckle, zipper, eyeglass frames or cellphone. But nickel in foods can cause an allergic reaction that is more widespread on the body. Foods high in nickel include nuts, seeds, chocolate, wheat and rye, Chen said. "Although allergic reactions to dietary nickel are not as common as nickel allergies overall, ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Benadryl, Hydroxyzine, Zyrtec, Promethazine, Claritin, Loratadine, Diphenhydramine, Allegra, Phenergan, Vistaril, Cetirizine, Dermatitis, Clobetasol, Cyproheptadine, Atarax, Fluocinonide, Fexofenadine, Xyzal

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Related Condition Support Groups

Psoriasis, Seborrheic Dermatitis, Contact Dermatitis, Atopic Dermatitis, Dermatitis, Eczema, Lichen Sclerosus

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