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Dementia News

Related terms: Chronic Brain Syndrome, DLB, Memory Loss

Noninvasive Brain Test May Pinpoint Type of Dementia

Posted 1 day 10 hours ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, July 26, 2017 – Distinguishing Alzheimer's disease from another common form of dementia may get easier using a new, noninvasive technique, researchers say. While Alzheimer's is the best-known form of dementia, another form of brain deterioration, called frontotemporal dementia (FTD), accounts for 10 percent to 15 percent of dementia cases. However, the researchers noted that FTD is often initially misdiagnosed as a psychiatric disorder, Alzheimer's disease or Parkinson's disease. "Recently, there has been a major advance in testing for these conditions. However, they [the tests] are invasive and expensive," noted Dr. Paul Wright, a neurologist who reviewed the new study. He directs neurology at Long Island Jewish Medical Center in New Hyde Park, N.Y. The new research was led by Dr. Barbara Borroni, of the University of Brescia, in Italy. Her team tested a technology called ... Read more

Related support groups: Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Head Imaging

In Mice, Brain Cells Discovered That Might Control Aging

Posted 1 day 10 hours ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, July 26, 2017 – Scientists working with mice believe they've identified brain cells that control aging. The discovery could lead to new ways to treat age-related diseases in people and extend lives, according to researchers at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York City. Their laboratory experiments suggest that adult neural stem cells in the brain's hypothalamus regulate the speed of aging in the body. The hypothalamus plays a role in important processes, such as growth, development, reproduction and metabolism. It was already known that the adult neural stem cells identified in this study are responsible for forming new brain neurons – cells. "Our research shows that the number of hypothalamic neural stem cells naturally declines over the life of the animal, and this decline accelerates aging," said study senior author Dr. Dongsheng Cai. "But we also found ... Read more

Related support groups: Dementia, Diagnosis and Investigation, Head Imaging

Targeting 9 Risk Factors Could Prevent 1 in 3 Dementia Cases: Study

Posted 7 days ago by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, July 20, 2017 – One-third of dementia cases worldwide might be prevented by paying attention to nine risk factors throughout life, researchers say. These measures include: staying in school until you're at least over the age of 15; reducing hearing loss, obesity and high blood pressure in mid-life (ages 45 to 65); and reducing smoking, depression, physical inactivity, social isolation and diabetes in later life (65 and older). Taking care of these risk factors would possibly prevent 35 percent of dementia cases, the study findings suggested. In comparison, targeting the major genetic risk factor – known as ApoE – would prevent less than one in 10 dementia cases (7 percent), the study authors said. The three risk factors that could potentially make the most difference in preventing dementia include: staying in school (which would reduce dementia cases by 8 percent); reducing ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, High Blood Pressure, Diabetes, Type 2, Obesity, Major Depressive Disorder, Hypertension, Smoking, Dementia, Smoking Cessation, Alzheimer's Disease, Insulin Resistance, Dysthymia, Pre-Diabetes, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Diabetes Mellitus, Hearing Loss, Abnormal Glucose Tolerance, Hypertensive Heart Disease, Dementia with Depressive Features, Lewy Body Dementia

Can Poor Sleep Boost Odds for Alzheimer's?

Posted 9 days ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, July 18, 2017 – Breathing problems during sleep may signal an increased risk for Alzheimer's disease, a trio of studies suggests. And, the researchers added, treating conditions like sleep apnea and hypopnea (shallow breathing) might lower the risk of dementia, or at least slow its progression. "What's exciting about these three studies is that they are looking at biological changes in the brain that may underlie a relationship between sleep problems and Alzheimer's disease," said Keith Fargo. He is director of scientific programs and outreach at the Alzheimer's Association. Fargo cautioned, however, that these studies only show an association between sleep problems and Alzheimer's disease, and not a cause-and-effect link. But it's possible that the development of the amyloid plaque that is a tell-tale sign of Alzheimer's is causing sleep problems, he noted. People with sleep ... Read more

Related support groups: Sleep Disorders, Insomnia, Fatigue, Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Sleep Apnea, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Shift Work Sleep Disorder

Special Training Plus Medication Might Help People With Advanced Alzheimer's

Posted 9 days ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, July 18, 2017 – People with advanced Alzheimer's can relearn some basic skills when they receive special training along with medication, a small study suggests. The research, which included 20 Alzheimer's patients, tested a program that combines specialized "memory coaching" with other services – including training and support groups for family caregivers. Researchers found that adding the program to medication – memantine (Namenda) – improved patients' ability to perform everyday tasks, such as dressing and bathing themselves, over six months. While the study group was small, the results demonstrate a basic point, according to lead researcher Dr. Barry Reisberg. "People with more-severe Alzheimer's can still learn," said Reisberg, a professor of psychiatry at NYU Langone Medical Center in New York City. As Alzheimer's progresses, Reisberg explained, people have increasing ... Read more

Related support groups: Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Exelon, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Rivastigmine, Galantamine, Reminyl, Razadyne, Razadyne ER

Dozens of Potential Alzheimer's Meds in the Pipeline

Posted 10 days ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, July 18, 2017 – Nearly three dozen new Alzheimer's drugs may begin clinical trials in the next five years, researchers say. That includes 27 drugs in phase 3 clinical trials, which are later in the drug review process. It also includes eight drugs in phase 2 clinical trials, according to an analysis by ResearchersAgainstAlzheimer's (RA2) investigators, an UsAgainstAlzheimer's network. "The Alzheimer's disease pipeline, marred by decades of failures and underinvestment, is due for big victories," said George Vradenburg, UsAgainstAlzheimer's co-founder and chair. "Thanks to growing investment from industry leaders, we remain cautiously optimistic that the current crop of late-stage Alzheimer's innovations will bring much-needed solutions to families in the near future," he said in a network news release. A new drug for Alzheimer's hasn't been approved in the United States since ... Read more

Related support groups: Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Exelon, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Rivastigmine, Galantamine, Reminyl, Razadyne, Razadyne ER, Lewy Body Dementia

Can Daily Crossword Protect You From Dementia?

Posted 10 days ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, July 17, 2017 – Doing a crossword puzzle every day may help keep your brain sharp as you age, researchers report. The British study of people aged 50 and older found the more often they did word puzzles, the higher they scored on attention, reasoning and memory tests. "We found direct relationships between the frequency of word puzzle use and the speed and accuracy of performance on nine cognitive tasks assessing a range of aspects of function including attention, reasoning and memory," said researcher Keith Wesnes. He's a professor of cognitive neuroscience at the University of Exeter in England. Performance was consistently better in those who reported engaging in puzzles, and generally improved incrementally with the frequency of puzzle use, he said. "For example, on test measures of grammatical reasoning speed and short-term memory accuracy, performing word puzzles was ... Read more

Related support groups: Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Arteriosclerotic Dementia, Drug-Induced Dementia, Lewy Body Dementia, Dementia with Depressive Features, Arteriosclerotic Dementia w/ Depressive Features

A Healthy Diet May Help Ward Off Dementia

Posted 10 days ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, July 17, 2017 – Eating right may help protect your brain health in old age, a group of new studies show, according to four new studies. In particular, the Mediterranean-DASH Intervention for Neurodegenerative Delay (MIND) diet lowered people's risk of dementia, two studies concluded. The MIND diet is a hybrid of the Mediterranean diet and the DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) diets, both of which were originally designed to help improve heart health. Seniors who carefully followed the MIND diet had a 35 percent lower risk of declining brain function as they aged. Even people who halfheartedly adhered to a MIND diet reduced their risk of brain decline between 18 to 24 percent. "We've always been saying that a healthy heart is a healthy brain," said Dean Hartley, director of science initiatives for the Alzheimer's Association. "Your brain uses 20 percent of your ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Weight Loss, Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Arteriosclerotic Dementia, Lewy Body Dementia, Drug-Induced Dementia

One Social Hour a Week Can Help Someone With Dementia

Posted 11 days ago by Drugs.com

SUNDAY, July 16, 2017 – Just a slight increase in social interaction benefits older adults with dementia and lowers health care costs, a new British study suggests. "People with dementia who are living in [nursing] homes are among the most vulnerable in our society," said study leader Clive Ballard. He's a professor at the University of Exeter Medical School in England. "Our outcomes show that good staff training and just one hour a week of social interaction significantly improves quality of life for a group of people who can often be forgotten by society," Ballard said in a university news release. The study included more than 800 dementia patients living in 69 nursing homes in the U.K. Two staff members at each home were trained to engage in simple social activities with the patients. This included talking to them about their interests and decisions about their care. When combined ... Read more

Related support groups: Social Anxiety Disorder, Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Arteriosclerotic Dementia, Drug-Induced Dementia, Lewy Body Dementia, Dementia with Depressive Features

Health Tip: Boosting Your Memory

Posted 13 days ago by Drugs.com

-- Feeling forgetful? There are steps you can take to help boost your memory. The American Psychological Association suggests: Take mental snapshots. For example, visualize your car keys in a wooden bowl near your front door. This will help you remember where you left them. Train your brain. If you meet someone named Mr. Brown, for example, picture him covered in that color. Vanishing cues. If you can't remember a name, write down all the letters that you can remember. Eventually, you may be able to fill in the blanks. Use technology. Your smartphone probably has a note-taking app that can send you an alert at a certain important time. Read more

Related support groups: Dementia, Mild Cognitive Impairment

Working Too Much Might Tip Heart Into Irregular Rhythm

Posted 13 days ago by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, July 14, 2017 – Working long hours might do more than exhaust you – it could also raise your risk of a common and potentially dangerous heart rhythm disorder, a new British study finds. "These findings show that long working hours are associated with an increased risk of atrial fibrillation, the most common cardiac arrhythmia," said study leader Mika Kivimaki, a professor of epidemiology at University College London. Because atrial fibrillation has long been a known risk factor for stroke, "this could be one of the mechanisms that explain the previously observed increased risk of stroke among those working long hours," Kivimaki said in a news release from the European Heart Journal. His team published their findings in the journal on July 14. One cardiologist in the United States said that because the study couldn't prove cause-and-effect, its results "need to be interpreted ... Read more

Related support groups: Atrial Fibrillation, Heart Disease, Ischemic Stroke, Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Prevention of Thromboembolism in Atrial Fibrillation, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Ischemic Stroke - Prophylaxis, Arteriosclerotic Dementia, Ischemic Heart Disease, Lewy Body Dementia

How Poor Sleep Might Raise Odds for Alzheimer's

Posted 17 days ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, July 10, 2017 – Researchers may have pinpointed the reason why poor sleep has been linked to a higher risk of Alzheimer's disease. The new study found that just one night of sleep disruption led to an increase in a protein called amyloid beta, while a week of sleep disturbance led to increased levels of a protein called tau. Both proteins are connected with Alzheimer's disease. "We showed that poor sleep is associated with higher levels of two Alzheimer's-associated proteins," said senior author Dr. David Holtzman. He is a professor and head of the department of neurology at Washington University School of Medicine, in St. Louis. "We think that perhaps chronic poor sleep during middle age may increase the risk of Alzheimer's later in life," Holtzman explained in a university news release. More than 5 million Americans have Alzheimer's, the study authors said. And previous ... Read more

Related support groups: Sleep Disorders, Insomnia, Fatigue, Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Diagnosis and Investigation, Shift Work Sleep Disorder, Jet Lag

Living With Purpose May Help Seniors Sleep Soundly

Posted 18 days ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, July 10, 2017 – Seniors who believe they have a purpose in life may sleep better, researchers say. Those who have good reasons to get up every day are less apt to have problems that keep them awake at night, such as sleep apnea and restless leg syndrome, according to a new study. People tend to have more trouble sleeping as they age, the researchers added. "Helping people cultivate a purpose in life could be an effective drug-free strategy to improve sleep quality, particularly for a population that is facing more insomnia," said study senior author Jason Ong. He's an associate professor of neurology at Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago. The study included more than 800 people between the ages of 60 and 100 who did not have dementia. Those who said their lives had meaning were 63 percent less likely to have sleep apnea and 52 percent less likely ... Read more

Related support groups: Sleep Disorders, Insomnia, Fatigue, Restless Legs Syndrome, Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Sleep Apnea, Periodic Limb Movement Disorder, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Obstructive Sleep Apnea/Hypopnea Syndrome, Shift Work Sleep Disorder

Severe Head Injury May Raise Dementia Risk Years Later

Posted 5 Jul 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, July 5, 2017 – A severe head injury, especially during middle age, could dramatically boost the risk for developing dementia later in life, new research from Finland suggests. The investigation tracked dementia risk among people who had suffered a traumatic brain injury [TBI] at 65 or younger. Ultimately, the researchers determined that not only did the risk go up for those who had a TBI, but the worse the initial head injury, the greater the risk of dementia. "The study showed that 3.5 percent of persons with moderate-to-severe TBI [were] diagnosed with a neurodegenerative disease [such as dementia] later in life," said study lead author Dr. Rahul Raj. He's an associate professor of experimental neurosurgery at Helsinki University Hospital. "This is substantially higher compared to age-matched peers with no history of brain injury," he noted. By comparison, "only 1.6 ... Read more

Related support groups: Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Head Injury, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Arteriosclerotic Dementia, Head Injury with Intracranial Hemorrhage, Head Injury w/ Intracranial Hemorrhage and Loss of Consciousness, Lewy Body Dementia, Arteriosclerotic Dementia w/ Depressive Features, Head Injury with Loss of Consciousness, Dementia with Depressive Features

Slowed Walking, Shrinking Brain?

Posted 29 Jun 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, June 29, 2017 – It isn't unusual for older people to slow down a bit as the years go by. But for seniors, slowed walking may signal mental decline, and now a new study suggests why. "Typically when physicians notice a slowing gait in their patients, they'll consider it a mechanical issue and refer the patient to physical therapy," said study author Andrea Rosso. "What we're finding is that physicians also should consider that there may be a brain pathology driving the slowing gait and refer the patient for a cognitive [mental] evaluation," she added. Rosso is an assistant professor in the University of Pittsburgh's department of epidemiology For the study, the researchers looked at 175 people, aged 70 to 79, who had normal mental function at the start of the study period. The participants all had regular assessments over the course of 14 years. People who developed slowed ... Read more

Related support groups: Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Psychiatric Disorders, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Lewy Body Dementia

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Related Condition Support Groups

Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Lewy Body Dementia, Arteriosclerotic Dementia, Dementia with Depressive Features, Alcoholic Dementia, Drug-Induced Dementia, Central Nervous System Disorders

Related Drug Support Groups

Haldol, haloperidol, Haldol Decanoate, Hydergine, Cognex, tacrine, Gerimal, Hydergine LC, ergoloid mesylates