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Related terms: Chronic Brain Syndrome, DLB, Memory Loss

Small Study Uncovers Brain Disease in Former Soccer Players

Posted 4 days ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 15, 2017 – For the first time, researchers have confirmed evidence of the devastating brain disease chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) in retired soccer players. Investigators in the United Kingdom examined the brains of six former soccer players with dementia who had died. All six had signs of Alzheimer's disease and four also had signs of CTE, the degenerative brain condition that has been linked to repetitive head trauma. "This is the first time CTE has been confirmed in a group of retired" soccer players, said study lead author Dr. Helen Ling, a neurologist at University College London. The rate of CTE among the former soccer players was higher than the 12 percent found in the general population, the researchers reported. Other studies have found evidence of CTE in the brains of athletes who compete in such contact sports as boxing and American football. While ... Read more

Related support groups: Dementia, Head Injury, Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Encephalopathy, Head Injury with Intracranial Hemorrhage, Head Injury w/ Intracranial Hemorrhage and Loss of Consciousness, Head Injury with Loss of Consciousness, Lewy Body Dementia

Can Air Pollution Heighten Alzheimer's Risk?

Posted 18 days ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 1, 2017 – Air pollution may cause more than just lung disease: New research suggests that if tiny particles in the air from power plants and cars are inhaled, they might also invade the brain, increasing the risk for dementia. "Although the link between air pollution and Alzheimer's disease is a new scientific frontier, we now have evidence that air pollution, like tobacco, is dangerous to the aging brain," said study co-senior author Caleb Finch. He's with the University of Southern California's (USC) Leonard Davis School of Gerontology. For the study, the USC scientists collected samples of air particles with technology designed by university engineers. The researchers used the technology to expose female mice to air pollution. "Our state-of-the-art aerosol technologies, called particle concentrators, essentially take the air of a typical urban area and convert it to ... Read more

Related support groups: Cough, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Bronchitis, Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Dyspnea, Cough and Nasal Congestion, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Bronchiectasis, Respiratory Tract Disease, Croup, Lewy Body Dementia, Dementia with Depressive Features, Reversible Airways Disease, Alcoholic Dementia, Drug-Induced Dementia

Bilingual People May Have an Edge Against Alzheimer's

Posted 19 days ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Jan. 30, 2017 – People who speak two or more languages appear to weather the ravages of Alzheimer's disease better than people who have only mastered one language, a new Italian study suggests. Bilingual people with Alzheimer's outperformed single-language speakers in short- and long-term memory tasks, even though scans showed more severe deterioration in brain metabolism among the bilingual participants, the scientists said. The ability to speak two languages appears to provide the brain with more resilience to withstand damage from Alzheimer's, said lead researcher Dr. Daniela Perani, a professor of psychology at Vita-Salute San Raffaele University in Milan. The more often a person swapped between two languages during their lifetime, the more capable their brains became of switching to alternate pathways that maintained thinking skills even as Alzheimer's damage accumulated, ... Read more

Related support groups: Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Arteriosclerotic Dementia, Diagnosis and Investigation, Head Imaging

Busy Minds May Be Better at Fighting Dementia

Posted 20 days ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Jan. 30, 2017 – Mentally stimulating activities can protect your brain against aging, even if you're genetically predisposed toward dementia or Alzheimer's disease, a new study reports. Activities that keep the brain busy – using a computer, crafting, playing games and participating in social activities – appear to lower the risk of age-related mental decline in people 70 and older, the Mayo Clinic study found. "These kind of commonly engaged in, stimulating activities actually reduce the risk of people developing mild cognitive impairment," said co-author Dr. Ronald Petersen. He's director of the Mayo Clinic Alzheimer's Disease Research Center in Rochester, Minn. The researchers found the benefits of mental stimulation even helped people who have apolipoprotein E (APOE) E4, a genetic risk factor for dementia and Alzheimer's. For their study, Mayo researchers followed more ... Read more

Related support groups: Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Drug-Induced Dementia, Lewy Body Dementia, Dementia with Depressive Features

Lack of Exercise Might Invite Dementia

Posted 27 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Jan. 27, 2017 – Parking yourself in front of the TV may make you as likely to develop dementia as people genetically predisposed to the condition, a Canadian study suggests. In a study of more than 1,600 adults aged 65 and older, those who led a sedentary life seemed to have the same risk of developing dementia as those who carried the apolipoprotein E (APOE) gene mutation, which increases the chances of developing dementia. Conversely, people who exercised appeared to have lower odds of developing dementia than those who didn't, the five-year study found. "Being inactive may completely negate the protective effects of a healthy set of genes," said lead researcher Jennifer Heisz, an assistant professor in the department of kinesiology at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario. However, the study didn't prove that lack of exercise caused dementia risk to increase. It only ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Diagnosis and Investigation, Lewy Body Dementia, Dementia with Depressive Features

Fitter Seniors May Have Healthier Brains

Posted 25 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Jan. 24, 2017 – Good heart and lung fitness can benefit older adults' brains, researchers report. They assessed the heart/lung fitness of healthy young adults (aged 18 to 31) and older adults (aged 55 to 74), and compared their ability to learn and remember the names of strangers in photos. MRI scans recorded images of their brain activity as they learned the names. The older adults had more difficulty with the memory test than the young adults. But older adults with high levels of heart/lung fitness did better on the test and showed more brain activity when learning new names than those of their peers with lower levels of heart/lung fitness. The increased brain activity in those with higher levels of heart/lung fitness occurred in regions typically affected by age-related decline. The findings suggest that heart/lung fitness may also help keep the brain healthy as people get ... Read more

Related support groups: Dementia, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Respiratory Tract Disease

Hospital-Related Delirium May Help Worsen Dementia

Posted 18 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 18, 2017 – Hospitalization-related delirium may speed mental decline in patients with dementia, a new study suggests. Delirium affects about one-fourth of older hospital patients and causes confusion and disorientation. British researchers looked at brain samples from nearly 1,000 people from the United Kingdom and Finland. They were 65 and older when they died. Records of their last 10 years of memory and thinking abilities, as well as episodes of delirium, were examined. Although the study couldn't prove cause and effect, the researchers found that memory changes were most severe among those with a history of hospital-related delirium and brain abnormalities indicating Alzheimer's disease or other types of dementia. "If delirium is causing brain injury in the short and long-term, then we must increase our efforts to diagnose, prevent and treat delirium. Ultimately, ... Read more

Related support groups: Dementia, Agitation, Alzheimer's Disease, Psychosis, Agitated State, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Lewy Body Dementia, Drug-Induced Dementia

High Blood Pressure May Not Be All Bad in the Elderly: Study

Posted 17 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Jan. 17, 2017 – Developing high blood pressure in very old age may provide some protection from dementia, a new study suggests. In middle age, high blood pressure – also called hypertension – boosts dementia risk later in life, said study lead researcher Maria Corrada. It also raises your risk for heart attack and stroke. But its onset in the eighth or ninth decade of life was linked to lower risk of mental decline in one's 90s, her team found. "Hypertension in the very old is not detrimental for mental health," said Corrada, a professor of neurology and epidemiology at the University of California, Irvine. Several factors may help explain the apparent association between late-life high blood pressure and lower dementia risk, Corrada said. For one, as people age, blood pressure may need to increase to keep blood flowing to the brain for normal functioning. "It's a matter of ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Hypertension, Metoprolol, Atenolol, Losartan, Hydrochlorothiazide, Propranolol, Benicar, Diovan, Dementia, Bystolic, Carvedilol, Alzheimer's Disease, Bisoprolol, Coreg, Inderal, Cozaar, Micardis, Valsartan, Sotalol

Common Viruses a Deadly Threat at Nursing Homes

Posted 13 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Jan. 13, 2017 – Common viruses pose a serious threat in nursing homes, often sabotaging standard infection control measures, a new case study suggests. "Long-term care facilities have unique challenges. Infection-control policies from acute care hospitals cannot simply be mirrored in this setting and expected to work," said study lead author Dr. Schaefer Spires. His report details a 16-day outbreak of two viruses – respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and human metapneumovirus (HMPV) – that swept through a long-term dementia ward in Tennessee. Nearly three-quarters of the patients became sick and five died. "RSV and HMPV are viruses that need to be taken as seriously as we take the flu, especially in older adults," said Spires, an assistant professor of infectious diseases at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine in Nashville. RSV causes infections of the lungs and ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Cough, Dementia, Cold Symptoms, Alzheimer's Disease, Upper Respiratory Tract Infection, Sore Throat, Cough and Nasal Congestion, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Viral Infection, Respiratory Tract Disease, Respiratory Syncytial Virus

'You're Not My Wife, You're an Impostor': Understanding Certain Delusions

Posted 6 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Jan. 6, 2017 – Some quirks of the mind can't yet be understood. But a new study may be closing in on one longstanding mystery: why someone might have delusions that a loved one is a stranger, or fail to recognize the family dog. "In the old days, they'd just say these people were crazy. But they are not crazy," said Dr. Kimford Meador, a professor of neurology and neurological sciences at Stanford University in Palo Alto, Calif. Instead, the delusions typically follow a stroke or similar brain injury, said Meador, who was not involved with the study but reviewed its contents. Such cases are often labeled as "delusional misidentification syndrome." This rare group of disorders leaves patients convinced people and places are not what they seem. Someone with Capgras syndrome, for instance, may recognize a loved one but feel like something is amiss. The brain then concludes that ... Read more

Related support groups: Dementia, Paranoid Disorder, Agitation, Psychosis, Agitated State, Psychiatric Disorders, Mild Cognitive Impairment, ICU Agitation

Want a Sharper Brain as You Age? Volunteer!

Posted 6 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Jan. 5, 2017 – People who are active in local community groups may have slightly sharper mental skills at the age of 50, a new study suggests. British researchers said their findings build on evidence that social engagement may help slow mental decline as people age. The findings were based on over 9,000 adults from the United Kingdom who'd been part of a long-term health study since they were children. At the ages of 33 and 50, they were asked about their involvement in any civic groups – including volunteer organizations, church groups, neighborhood associations and groups involved in politics or social causes, among others. At age 50, all the participants took standard tests of "cognitive" abilities, such as memory, thinking and reasoning skills. Overall, the study found, people involved in groups scored a little higher on those tests – between 0.4 and 0.6 points higher, ... Read more

Related support groups: Dementia, Mild Cognitive Impairment

Does Living Near Major Roads Boost Dementia Risk?

Posted 5 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 4, 2017 – Want to cut your chances for Alzheimer's disease and other dementias? A new study suggests that picking a home far from major roadways might help. The Canadian study found that people who lived relatively close to busy traffic had a slightly higher risk for dementia. More specifically, this type of mental decline was more common among those who lived within about 160 feet of a major street, the study found. And the closer people lived to heavy traffic, the stronger the association. The research, published Jan. 4 in The Lancet, couldn't prove cause-and-effect, only an association, the researchers stressed. However, "our study suggests that busy roads could be a source of environmental stressors that could give rise to the onset of dementia," study author Hong Chen, with Public Health Ontario, said in a journal news release. One neurologist who reviewed the ... Read more

Related support groups: Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Drug-Induced Dementia, Lewy Body Dementia, Dementia with Depressive Features

Plant-Based Diets Score Big for Healthy Weight Loss

Posted 4 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 4, 2017 – If you've resolved to eat healthy and lose weight in 2017, a new report suggests the DASH diet may be your best bet. For the seventh year in a row, U.S. News & World Report has named the plant-based eating plan as the best choice overall, followed by the Mediterranean diet, up from fourth place last year. DASH stands for Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension, but its benefits go beyond preventing high blood pressure, the report found. The DASH and the Mediterranean diets, as well as most of the other recommended diets, focus on eating whole grains, fruits, vegetables, low- or no-fat dairy, lean meats, poultry and fish. They also recommend nuts, seeds and legumes (beans). But these diets limit or exclude most fats and sweets, and recommend modest portions, according to Dr. David Katz. He is president of the American College of Lifestyle Medicine and a member ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Obesity, Hypertension, Heart Disease, Weight Loss, Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Diabetes Mellitus, Ischemic Heart Disease, Abnormal Glucose Tolerance

Antipsychotic Drugs May Up Risk of Early Death in Alzheimer's Patients

Posted 27 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Dec. 27, 2016 – Taking antipsychotic drugs significantly increases the risk of premature death among Alzheimer's patients, a new study indicates. Researchers analyzed data from almost 58,000 people in Finland diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease between 2005 and 2011. Slightly more than a quarter of the Alzheimer's patients took antipsychotic drugs. The study found they had a 60 percent higher risk of death than those who didn't take the drugs. The risk of death was highest when patients first started taking antipsychotics, but the increased risk persisted with long-term use of the drugs. Patients who took two or more antipsychotic drugs at the same time were nearly twice as likely to die early than those who took one antipsychotic. Although the study found an association between antipsychotic drug use and a higher risk of dying, it cannot prove a cause-and-effect link. But, the ... Read more

Related support groups: Seroquel, Abilify, Lithium, Zyprexa, Latuda, Dementia, Risperdal, Risperidone, Saphris, Geodon, Quetiapine, Seroquel XR, Agitation, Alzheimer's Disease, Olanzapine, Invega, Haldol, Haloperidol, Aripiprazole, Clozapine

Beta Blockers May Not Be Best Heart Drugs for Dementia Patients

Posted 12 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Dec. 12, 2016 – Beta blocker drugs are often the go-to medication for people who've survived a heart attack. But a new study suggests that they may not be the medicine of choice for nursing home residents with dementia. Taking the drugs reduced the risk of death during the study period by about a quarter, the researchers said. But the drugs were also associated with 34 percent higher risk that a patient with moderate or severe dementia would be unable to independently perform the functions of daily life. One heart expert who reviewed the findings said the study supports the notion that there's no "one-size-fits-all" approach to cardiovascular care. The findings highlight "the importance of personalizing medical care for an individual elderly patient following a heart attack," said Dr. Kevin Marzo. He is chief of cardiology at Winthrop-University Hospital in Mineola, N.Y. ... Read more

Related support groups: Metoprolol, Atenolol, Propranolol, Dementia, Bystolic, Carvedilol, Alzheimer's Disease, Bisoprolol, Inderal, Coreg, Sotalol, Toprol-XL, Lopressor, Timolol, Nadolol, Metoprolol Succinate ER, Labetalol, Tenormin, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Nebivolol

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Related Condition Support Groups

Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Lewy Body Dementia, Arteriosclerotic Dementia, Dementia with Depressive Features, Alcoholic Dementia, Drug-Induced Dementia, Central Nervous System Disorders

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Haldol, haloperidol, Haldol Decanoate, Hydergine, Cognex, tacrine, Gerimal, Hydergine LC, ergoloid mesylates