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Related terms: Chronic Brain Syndrome, DLB, Memory Loss

Vitamin E, Selenium Supplements Won't Curb Men's Dementia Risk

Posted 7 days ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, March 20, 2017 – A daily dose of vitamin E or selenium supplements won't keep dementia at bay in older men, new research reveals. "After an average of five years of supplementation, and up to 11 years of follow-up, we did not observe fewer new cases of dementia among men who took any of the supplements compared to neither supplement," said study co-author Frederick Schmitt. He's a professor with the Sanders-Brown Center on Aging and the department of neurology at the University of Kentucky in Lexington. "Based on these results, we do not recommend vitamin E or selenium supplements to prevent dementia at these doses," he added. Approximately 5 million American seniors are now living with Alzheimer's, the study authors noted. Selenium is an essential antioxidant, according to the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH). It's involved in promoting hormone metabolism, as well as ... Read more

Related support groups: Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Vitamin E, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Selenium, Aquasol E, Alpha E, Vita-Plus E Natural, Pediatrace, Multitrace-5, Chromic Chloride Hexahydrate/Copper Sulfate/Manganese Sulfate/Selenium/Zinc Sulfate, E Pherol, Nutr-E-Sol, E-Gems, MTE-5, Sele-Pak, NeoQ10, MTE-6, Lewy Body Dementia, Selepen

Dizzy Spells in Middle-Age Tied to Dementia Risk Later

Posted 17 days ago by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, March 10, 2017 – Middle-aged adults who get dizzy when they stand due to a temporary drop in blood pressure may be at increased risk for dementia when they're older, new research suggests. These episodes of sudden low blood pressure – called orthostatic hypotension – may leave lasting damage due to reduced blood flow to the brain, according to researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. For the study, the investigators analyzed data from more than 11,500 adults, average age 54, who were followed for 20 or more years. People with orthostatic hypotension at the outset were 40 percent more likely to develop dementia than others. They also had a 15 percent increased risk of cognitive (mental) decline, the findings showed. However, the study could not prove a cause-and-effect relationship. "Even though these episodes are fleeting, they may have impacts that ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Hypertension, Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Arteriosclerotic Dementia, Lewy Body Dementia, Drug-Induced Dementia

Study: Gene Test Needed Before Using Alzheimer's Drug 'Off-Label'

Posted 20 days ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, March 7, 2017 – A drug used to treat Alzheimer's disease should not be prescribed to people with milder mental impairment without first giving them a genetic test, a new study urges. The drug is donepezil (brand name: Aricept). Donepezil could speed mental decline in someone with mild cognitive impairment who has a specific genetic variation, according to Sophie Sokolow, an associate professor at the UCLA School of Nursing. She and her colleagues found that patients with the K-variant of the butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) gene who took donepezil deteriorated faster than those who took a placebo. Donepezil is approved in the United States to treat Alzheimer's disease but not mild cognitive impairment – the stage between normal age-related decline and dementia. However, doctors often prescribe it "off-label" for patients with mild cognitive impairment, the study authors said. For ... Read more

Related support groups: Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Aricept, Donepezil, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Namzaric, Donepezil/memantine, Dementia with Depressive Features, Head Imaging, Aricept ODT

Annual Death Toll From Alzheimer's Nearly Doubles in 15 Years

Posted 7 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, March 7, 2017 – Alzheimer's disease claims nearly twice as many American lives annually as it did just 15 years ago, a new report shows. "And that's frankly alarming," said Keith Fargo, director of scientific programs and outreach at the Alzheimer's Association, which produced the report. "Now, a lot of people will think it's because we're living longer," he added. "And there is some truth to that. But there's also an assumption that we should just expect to get Alzheimer's disease as we get older. And that's not true. "Most people do not get Alzheimer's, even if they live into their 80s or 90s. It's not normal. It's not something that we should accept. We've definitely got to do something about it," Fargo said. The report also found that more than 5 million American seniors aged 65 and older now live with the memory-robbing disease. That represents approximately 10 percent of ... Read more

Related support groups: Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Diagnosis and Investigation, Head Imaging, Lewy Body Dementia

Immune Disorders Such as MS, Psoriasis May Be Tied to Dementia Risk

Posted 2 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, March 1, 2017 – People with autoimmune diseases – conditions that cause a person's immune system to turn against the body – appear to have an increased risk of developing dementia, a new British study suggests. Researchers found that 18 out of 25 different autoimmune diseases, such as lupus, psoriasis or multiple sclerosis, "showed a statistically significant association with dementia," said study co-author Dr. Michael Goldacre. He's a professor of public health at the University of Oxford. But Goldacre and other experts stressed that the study didn't prove that autoimmune diseases cause dementia. The research only showed that these conditions are associated with a higher risk of dementia. Specifically, the study found that people with multiple sclerosis appeared to have nearly double the risk of dementia. Psoriasis was associated with a 29 percent increased risk of ... Read more

Related support groups: Multiple Sclerosis, Heart Disease, Ischemic Stroke, Psoriasis, Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Transient Ischemic Attack, Plaque Psoriasis, Ischemic Stroke - Prophylaxis, Chronic Spasticity, Spasticity, Ischemic Heart Disease, Psoriatic Arthropathy

Is Need for More Sleep a Sign of Pending Dementia?

Posted 23 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 22, 2017 – Seniors who begin sleeping more than nine hours a night may face a higher risk of dementia down the road, a new study suggests. The researchers estimated that the risk of dementia grew by almost 2.5 times for those who found themselves recently needing extra sleep. The chances of dementia rose sixfold for people without a high school degree who suddenly needed to sleep nine hours or more, the study contended. The study authors said this finding hinted that education might somehow offer a bit of protection from dementia. People with dementia often suffer from disrupted sleep, "but we don't know much about whether these changes come first," said study co-author Matthew Pase. He's a neurology fellow at the Boston University School of Medicine. Dementia "is by no means a certain fate" in those who find themselves sleeping longer as they age, Pase said. The new ... Read more

Related support groups: Sleep Disorders, Insomnia, Fatigue, Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Sleep Apnea, Shift Work Sleep Disorder, Drowsiness, Hypersomnia, Obstructive Sleep Apnea/Hypopnea Syndrome, Diagnosis and Investigation, Drug-Induced Dementia, Lewy Body Dementia

Unhealthy in Middle Age, Dementia in Old Age?

Posted 23 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 22, 2017 – Middle-aged men and women at risk for heart disease may also face a higher chance of dementia later in life, a new study suggests. Risk factors such as smoking, high blood pressure and diabetes might boost the odds of dementia almost as much as carrying the gene that raises the risk of Alzheimer's disease, the researchers reported. "Most of these risk factors are treatable or preventable. And it is important to treat these vascular [circulatory system] risk factors starting at least in middle age, if not earlier," said lead researcher Dr. Rebecca Gottesman. She's an associate professor of neurology and epidemiology at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore. Know your blood pressure, so it can be treated if it's high. Also, know if you have diabetes, so you can control and treat it. And stop smoking, Gottesman said. "These are important risk factors not only ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Hypertension, Smoking, Heart Disease, Dementia, Smoking Cessation, Alzheimer's Disease, Diabetes Mellitus, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Ischemic Heart Disease, Drug-Induced Dementia, Lewy Body Dementia, Dementia with Depressive Features

Staying Socially Active Nourishes the Aging Brain

Posted 20 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Feb. 20, 2017 – Socializing with lots of relatives and friends may help you stay mentally sharp as you age, a new report co-sponsored by AARP finds. "It's not uncommon for our social networks to shrink in size as we get older," said Marilyn Albert, professor of neurology and director of cognitive neuroscience at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore. "This report provides many helpful suggestions about the things we can do to improve the quality of our relationships with family and friends, which may be beneficial in maintaining our mental abilities," Albert said in an AARP news release. The report also discusses the social benefits of having pets, how age-friendly communities boost social ties, how close relationships benefit both physical and mental health, and how social media (including Facebook and Skype) helps older adults maintain social connections. The report is from ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Anxiety and Stress, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Social Anxiety Disorder, Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Performance Anxiety, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Lewy Body Dementia, Dementia with Depressive Features

Small Study Uncovers Brain Disease in Former Soccer Players

Posted 15 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 15, 2017 – For the first time, researchers have confirmed evidence of the devastating brain disease chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) in retired soccer players. Investigators in the United Kingdom examined the brains of six former soccer players with dementia who had died. All six had signs of Alzheimer's disease and four also had signs of CTE, the degenerative brain condition that has been linked to repetitive head trauma. "This is the first time CTE has been confirmed in a group of retired" soccer players, said study lead author Dr. Helen Ling, a neurologist at University College London. The rate of CTE among the former soccer players was higher than the 12 percent found in the general population, the researchers reported. Other studies have found evidence of CTE in the brains of athletes who compete in such contact sports as boxing and American football. While ... Read more

Related support groups: Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Head Injury, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Encephalopathy, Head Injury with Intracranial Hemorrhage, Head Injury w/ Intracranial Hemorrhage and Loss of Consciousness, Lewy Body Dementia, Head Injury with Loss of Consciousness

Can Air Pollution Heighten Alzheimer's Risk?

Posted 1 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 1, 2017 – Air pollution may cause more than just lung disease: New research suggests that if tiny particles in the air from power plants and cars are inhaled, they might also invade the brain, increasing the risk for dementia. "Although the link between air pollution and Alzheimer's disease is a new scientific frontier, we now have evidence that air pollution, like tobacco, is dangerous to the aging brain," said study co-senior author Caleb Finch. He's with the University of Southern California's (USC) Leonard Davis School of Gerontology. For the study, the USC scientists collected samples of air particles with technology designed by university engineers. The researchers used the technology to expose female mice to air pollution. "Our state-of-the-art aerosol technologies, called particle concentrators, essentially take the air of a typical urban area and convert it to ... Read more

Related support groups: Cough, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Bronchitis, Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Dyspnea, Cough and Nasal Congestion, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Bronchiectasis, Respiratory Tract Disease, Croup, Dementia with Depressive Features, Reversible Airways Disease, Alcoholic Dementia, Drug-Induced Dementia, Lewy Body Dementia

Bilingual People May Have an Edge Against Alzheimer's

Posted 31 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Jan. 30, 2017 – People who speak two or more languages appear to weather the ravages of Alzheimer's disease better than people who have only mastered one language, a new Italian study suggests. Bilingual people with Alzheimer's outperformed single-language speakers in short- and long-term memory tasks, even though scans showed more severe deterioration in brain metabolism among the bilingual participants, the scientists said. The ability to speak two languages appears to provide the brain with more resilience to withstand damage from Alzheimer's, said lead researcher Dr. Daniela Perani, a professor of psychology at Vita-Salute San Raffaele University in Milan. The more often a person swapped between two languages during their lifetime, the more capable their brains became of switching to alternate pathways that maintained thinking skills even as Alzheimer's damage accumulated, ... Read more

Related support groups: Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Arteriosclerotic Dementia, Diagnosis and Investigation, Head Imaging

Busy Minds May Be Better at Fighting Dementia

Posted 31 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Jan. 30, 2017 – Mentally stimulating activities can protect your brain against aging, even if you're genetically predisposed toward dementia or Alzheimer's disease, a new study reports. Activities that keep the brain busy – using a computer, crafting, playing games and participating in social activities – appear to lower the risk of age-related mental decline in people 70 and older, the Mayo Clinic study found. "These kind of commonly engaged in, stimulating activities actually reduce the risk of people developing mild cognitive impairment," said co-author Dr. Ronald Petersen. He's director of the Mayo Clinic Alzheimer's Disease Research Center in Rochester, Minn. The researchers found the benefits of mental stimulation even helped people who have apolipoprotein E (APOE) E4, a genetic risk factor for dementia and Alzheimer's. For their study, Mayo researchers followed more ... Read more

Related support groups: Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Drug-Induced Dementia, Lewy Body Dementia, Dementia with Depressive Features

Lack of Exercise Might Invite Dementia

Posted 27 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Jan. 27, 2017 – Parking yourself in front of the TV may make you as likely to develop dementia as people genetically predisposed to the condition, a Canadian study suggests. In a study of more than 1,600 adults aged 65 and older, those who led a sedentary life seemed to have the same risk of developing dementia as those who carried the apolipoprotein E (APOE) gene mutation, which increases the chances of developing dementia. Conversely, people who exercised appeared to have lower odds of developing dementia than those who didn't, the five-year study found. "Being inactive may completely negate the protective effects of a healthy set of genes," said lead researcher Jennifer Heisz, an assistant professor in the department of kinesiology at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario. However, the study didn't prove that lack of exercise caused dementia risk to increase. It only ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Diagnosis and Investigation, Lewy Body Dementia, Dementia with Depressive Features

Fitter Seniors May Have Healthier Brains

Posted 25 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Jan. 24, 2017 – Good heart and lung fitness can benefit older adults' brains, researchers report. They assessed the heart/lung fitness of healthy young adults (aged 18 to 31) and older adults (aged 55 to 74), and compared their ability to learn and remember the names of strangers in photos. MRI scans recorded images of their brain activity as they learned the names. The older adults had more difficulty with the memory test than the young adults. But older adults with high levels of heart/lung fitness did better on the test and showed more brain activity when learning new names than those of their peers with lower levels of heart/lung fitness. The increased brain activity in those with higher levels of heart/lung fitness occurred in regions typically affected by age-related decline. The findings suggest that heart/lung fitness may also help keep the brain healthy as people get ... Read more

Related support groups: Dementia, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Respiratory Tract Disease

Hospital-Related Delirium May Help Worsen Dementia

Posted 18 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 18, 2017 – Hospitalization-related delirium may speed mental decline in patients with dementia, a new study suggests. Delirium affects about one-fourth of older hospital patients and causes confusion and disorientation. British researchers looked at brain samples from nearly 1,000 people from the United Kingdom and Finland. They were 65 and older when they died. Records of their last 10 years of memory and thinking abilities, as well as episodes of delirium, were examined. Although the study couldn't prove cause and effect, the researchers found that memory changes were most severe among those with a history of hospital-related delirium and brain abnormalities indicating Alzheimer's disease or other types of dementia. "If delirium is causing brain injury in the short and long-term, then we must increase our efforts to diagnose, prevent and treat delirium. Ultimately, ... Read more

Related support groups: Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Agitation, Psychosis, Agitated State, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Lewy Body Dementia, Drug-Induced Dementia

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Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Lewy Body Dementia, Arteriosclerotic Dementia, Dementia with Depressive Features, Alcoholic Dementia, Drug-Induced Dementia, Central Nervous System Disorders

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Haldol, haloperidol, Haldol Decanoate, Hydergine, Cognex, tacrine, Gerimal, Hydergine LC, ergoloid mesylates