Skip to Content

Join the 'Dementia with Depressive Features' group to help and get support from people like you.

Dementia with Depressive Features News

Targeting 9 Risk Factors Could Prevent 1 in 3 Dementia Cases: Study

Posted 4 days ago by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, July 20, 2017 – One-third of dementia cases worldwide might be prevented by paying attention to nine risk factors throughout life, researchers say. These measures include: staying in school until you're at least over the age of 15; reducing hearing loss, obesity and high blood pressure in mid-life (ages 45 to 65); and reducing smoking, depression, physical inactivity, social isolation and diabetes in later life (65 and older). Taking care of these risk factors would possibly prevent 35 percent of dementia cases, the study findings suggested. In comparison, targeting the major genetic risk factor – known as ApoE – would prevent less than one in 10 dementia cases (7 percent), the study authors said. The three risk factors that could potentially make the most difference in preventing dementia include: staying in school (which would reduce dementia cases by 8 percent); reducing ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, High Blood Pressure, Obesity, Diabetes, Type 2, Major Depressive Disorder, Hypertension, Smoking, Dementia, Smoking Cessation, Alzheimer's Disease, Insulin Resistance, Dysthymia, Pre-Diabetes, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Diabetes Mellitus, Hearing Loss, Abnormal Glucose Tolerance, Hypertensive Heart Disease, Alcoholic Dementia, Dementia with Depressive Features

Can Daily Crossword Protect You From Dementia?

Posted 7 days ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, July 17, 2017 – Doing a crossword puzzle every day may help keep your brain sharp as you age, researchers report. The British study of people aged 50 and older found the more often they did word puzzles, the higher they scored on attention, reasoning and memory tests. "We found direct relationships between the frequency of word puzzle use and the speed and accuracy of performance on nine cognitive tasks assessing a range of aspects of function including attention, reasoning and memory," said researcher Keith Wesnes. He's a professor of cognitive neuroscience at the University of Exeter in England. Performance was consistently better in those who reported engaging in puzzles, and generally improved incrementally with the frequency of puzzle use, he said. "For example, on test measures of grammatical reasoning speed and short-term memory accuracy, performing word puzzles was ... Read more

Related support groups: Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Arteriosclerotic Dementia, Drug-Induced Dementia, Lewy Body Dementia, Dementia with Depressive Features, Arteriosclerotic Dementia w/ Depressive Features

One Social Hour a Week Can Help Someone With Dementia

Posted 8 days ago by Drugs.com

SUNDAY, July 16, 2017 – Just a slight increase in social interaction benefits older adults with dementia and lowers health care costs, a new British study suggests. "People with dementia who are living in [nursing] homes are among the most vulnerable in our society," said study leader Clive Ballard. He's a professor at the University of Exeter Medical School in England. "Our outcomes show that good staff training and just one hour a week of social interaction significantly improves quality of life for a group of people who can often be forgotten by society," Ballard said in a university news release. The study included more than 800 dementia patients living in 69 nursing homes in the U.K. Two staff members at each home were trained to engage in simple social activities with the patients. This included talking to them about their interests and decisions about their care. When combined ... Read more

Related support groups: Social Anxiety Disorder, Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Arteriosclerotic Dementia, Drug-Induced Dementia, Lewy Body Dementia, Dementia with Depressive Features

Severe Head Injury May Raise Dementia Risk Years Later

Posted 19 days ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, July 5, 2017 – A severe head injury, especially during middle age, could dramatically boost the risk for developing dementia later in life, new research from Finland suggests. The investigation tracked dementia risk among people who had suffered a traumatic brain injury [TBI] at 65 or younger. Ultimately, the researchers determined that not only did the risk go up for those who had a TBI, but the worse the initial head injury, the greater the risk of dementia. "The study showed that 3.5 percent of persons with moderate-to-severe TBI [were] diagnosed with a neurodegenerative disease [such as dementia] later in life," said study lead author Dr. Rahul Raj. He's an associate professor of experimental neurosurgery at Helsinki University Hospital. "This is substantially higher compared to age-matched peers with no history of brain injury," he noted. By comparison, "only 1.6 ... Read more

Related support groups: Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Head Injury, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Arteriosclerotic Dementia, Head Injury with Intracranial Hemorrhage, Head Injury w/ Intracranial Hemorrhage and Loss of Consciousness, Lewy Body Dementia, Arteriosclerotic Dementia w/ Depressive Features, Head Injury with Loss of Consciousness, Dementia with Depressive Features

Lifestyle Changes Might Prevent or Slow Dementia

Posted 22 Jun 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, June 22, 2017 – Simple changes to your lifestyle might delay the start of dementia or slow its progression, a new report suggests. Some scientific evidence indicates that keeping your mind active through "cognitive training," controlling your blood pressure and exercising more may pay dividends in terms of brain health, researchers determined. Although not yet proven to thwart the cognitive decline that accompanies aging or dementia, the public should have access to this information, said Alan Leshner. He led the committee at the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine that compiled the report. "There are a few domains where the evidence that does exist suggests they might have an effect," said Leshner. "At least two of those, we know, are good for a whole lot of other things that people do or that they could suffer from. That's controlling your blood ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Hypertension, Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Arteriosclerotic Dementia, Hypertensive Emergency, Hypertensive Heart Disease, Arteriosclerotic Dementia w/ Depressive Features, Lewy Body Dementia, Dementia with Depressive Features

Seniors' Well-Being May Get a Boost From Green Spaces

Posted 17 Apr 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, April 17, 2017 – Green spaces in cities benefit residents of all ages. Now, British researchers say, they may also boost older people's mental well-being. "We found that older participants experienced beneficial effects of green space whilst walking between busy built urban environments and urban green space environments," said study author Chris Neale. "Indeed, this work is the first to be published in a series of papers understanding the impact of green and urban spaces on brain activity in older adults," said Neale, a research fellow at the University of York's Stockholm Environment Institute in England. The small study included eight people, 65 and older, who wore portable devices that recorded their brain activity as they walked in both busy and green urban locations. They were also interviewed before and after their outings. The participants experienced changes in levels ... Read more

Related support groups: Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Dementia with Depressive Features

Study: Gene Test Needed Before Using Alzheimer's Drug 'Off-Label'

Posted 8 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, March 7, 2017 – A drug used to treat Alzheimer's disease should not be prescribed to people with milder mental impairment without first giving them a genetic test, a new study urges. The drug is donepezil (brand name: Aricept). Donepezil could speed mental decline in someone with mild cognitive impairment who has a specific genetic variation, according to Sophie Sokolow, an associate professor at the UCLA School of Nursing. She and her colleagues found that patients with the K-variant of the butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) gene who took donepezil deteriorated faster than those who took a placebo. Donepezil is approved in the United States to treat Alzheimer's disease but not mild cognitive impairment – the stage between normal age-related decline and dementia. However, doctors often prescribe it "off-label" for patients with mild cognitive impairment, the study authors said. For ... Read more

Related support groups: Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Aricept, Donepezil, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Namzaric, Donepezil/memantine, Dementia with Depressive Features, Head Imaging, Aricept ODT

Unhealthy in Middle Age, Dementia in Old Age?

Posted 23 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 22, 2017 – Middle-aged men and women at risk for heart disease may also face a higher chance of dementia later in life, a new study suggests. Risk factors such as smoking, high blood pressure and diabetes might boost the odds of dementia almost as much as carrying the gene that raises the risk of Alzheimer's disease, the researchers reported. "Most of these risk factors are treatable or preventable. And it is important to treat these vascular [circulatory system] risk factors starting at least in middle age, if not earlier," said lead researcher Dr. Rebecca Gottesman. She's an associate professor of neurology and epidemiology at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore. Know your blood pressure, so it can be treated if it's high. Also, know if you have diabetes, so you can control and treat it. And stop smoking, Gottesman said. "These are important risk factors not only ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Hypertension, Smoking, Heart Disease, Dementia, Smoking Cessation, Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Diabetes Mellitus, Ischemic Heart Disease, Drug-Induced Dementia, Lewy Body Dementia, Dementia with Depressive Features

Staying Socially Active Nourishes the Aging Brain

Posted 20 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Feb. 20, 2017 – Socializing with lots of relatives and friends may help you stay mentally sharp as you age, a new report co-sponsored by AARP finds. "It's not uncommon for our social networks to shrink in size as we get older," said Marilyn Albert, professor of neurology and director of cognitive neuroscience at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore. "This report provides many helpful suggestions about the things we can do to improve the quality of our relationships with family and friends, which may be beneficial in maintaining our mental abilities," Albert said in an AARP news release. The report also discusses the social benefits of having pets, how age-friendly communities boost social ties, how close relationships benefit both physical and mental health, and how social media (including Facebook and Skype) helps older adults maintain social connections. The report is from ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Anxiety and Stress, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Social Anxiety Disorder, Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Performance Anxiety, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Lewy Body Dementia, Dementia with Depressive Features

Can Air Pollution Heighten Alzheimer's Risk?

Posted 1 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 1, 2017 – Air pollution may cause more than just lung disease: New research suggests that if tiny particles in the air from power plants and cars are inhaled, they might also invade the brain, increasing the risk for dementia. "Although the link between air pollution and Alzheimer's disease is a new scientific frontier, we now have evidence that air pollution, like tobacco, is dangerous to the aging brain," said study co-senior author Caleb Finch. He's with the University of Southern California's (USC) Leonard Davis School of Gerontology. For the study, the USC scientists collected samples of air particles with technology designed by university engineers. The researchers used the technology to expose female mice to air pollution. "Our state-of-the-art aerosol technologies, called particle concentrators, essentially take the air of a typical urban area and convert it to ... Read more

Related support groups: Cough, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Bronchitis, Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Dyspnea, Cough and Nasal Congestion, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Bronchiectasis, Respiratory Tract Disease, Croup, Dementia with Depressive Features, Reversible Airways Disease, Alcoholic Dementia, Drug-Induced Dementia, Lewy Body Dementia

Busy Minds May Be Better at Fighting Dementia

Posted 31 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Jan. 30, 2017 – Mentally stimulating activities can protect your brain against aging, even if you're genetically predisposed toward dementia or Alzheimer's disease, a new study reports. Activities that keep the brain busy – using a computer, crafting, playing games and participating in social activities – appear to lower the risk of age-related mental decline in people 70 and older, the Mayo Clinic study found. "These kind of commonly engaged in, stimulating activities actually reduce the risk of people developing mild cognitive impairment," said co-author Dr. Ronald Petersen. He's director of the Mayo Clinic Alzheimer's Disease Research Center in Rochester, Minn. The researchers found the benefits of mental stimulation even helped people who have apolipoprotein E (APOE) E4, a genetic risk factor for dementia and Alzheimer's. For their study, Mayo researchers followed more ... Read more

Related support groups: Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Drug-Induced Dementia, Lewy Body Dementia, Dementia with Depressive Features

Lack of Exercise Might Invite Dementia

Posted 27 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Jan. 27, 2017 – Parking yourself in front of the TV may make you as likely to develop dementia as people genetically predisposed to the condition, a Canadian study suggests. In a study of more than 1,600 adults aged 65 and older, those who led a sedentary life seemed to have the same risk of developing dementia as those who carried the apolipoprotein E (APOE) gene mutation, which increases the chances of developing dementia. Conversely, people who exercised appeared to have lower odds of developing dementia than those who didn't, the five-year study found. "Being inactive may completely negate the protective effects of a healthy set of genes," said lead researcher Jennifer Heisz, an assistant professor in the department of kinesiology at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario. However, the study didn't prove that lack of exercise caused dementia risk to increase. It only ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Diagnosis and Investigation, Lewy Body Dementia, Dementia with Depressive Features

Does Living Near Major Roads Boost Dementia Risk?

Posted 5 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 4, 2017 – Want to cut your chances for Alzheimer's disease and other dementias? A new study suggests that picking a home far from major roadways might help. The Canadian study found that people who lived relatively close to busy traffic had a slightly higher risk for dementia. More specifically, this type of mental decline was more common among those who lived within about 160 feet of a major street, the study found. And the closer people lived to heavy traffic, the stronger the association. The research, published Jan. 4 in The Lancet, couldn't prove cause-and-effect, only an association, the researchers stressed. However, "our study suggests that busy roads could be a source of environmental stressors that could give rise to the onset of dementia," study author Hong Chen, with Public Health Ontario, said in a journal news release. One neurologist who reviewed the ... Read more

Related support groups: Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Drug-Induced Dementia, Lewy Body Dementia, Dementia with Depressive Features

Beta Blockers May Not Be Best Heart Drugs for Dementia Patients

Posted 12 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Dec. 12, 2016 – Beta blocker drugs are often the go-to medication for people who've survived a heart attack. But a new study suggests that they may not be the medicine of choice for nursing home residents with dementia. Taking the drugs reduced the risk of death during the study period by about a quarter, the researchers said. But the drugs were also associated with 34 percent higher risk that a patient with moderate or severe dementia would be unable to independently perform the functions of daily life. One heart expert who reviewed the findings said the study supports the notion that there's no "one-size-fits-all" approach to cardiovascular care. The findings highlight "the importance of personalizing medical care for an individual elderly patient following a heart attack," said Dr. Kevin Marzo. He is chief of cardiology at Winthrop-University Hospital in Mineola, N.Y. ... Read more

Related support groups: Metoprolol, Atenolol, Propranolol, Dementia, Bystolic, Carvedilol, Alzheimer's Disease, Bisoprolol, Coreg, Inderal, Sotalol, Toprol-XL, Lopressor, Timolol, Nadolol, Metoprolol Succinate ER, Labetalol, Tenormin, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Metoprolol Tartrate

Aerobic Exercise May Help Guard Against Dementia

Posted 30 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 30, 2016 – Aerobic exercise may strengthen memory and thinking skills in older adults with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), a small study suggests. People with mild cognitive impairment are at increased risk for Alzheimer's disease. The study included 16 people, average age 63, who did aerobic workouts such as on a treadmill, stationary bike or elliptical training. They worked out four times a week for six months. There was also a control group of 19 people, average age 67, who did stretching exercises four times a week for six months but no aerobic activity. All of the participants had mild cognitive impairment. After six months, brain scans revealed that those in the aerobic exercise group had greater increases in brain volume than those in the stretching group, the researchers said. Those in the exercise group also showed significant improvement in thinking and ... Read more

Related support groups: Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Arteriosclerotic Dementia, Lewy Body Dementia, Dementia with Depressive Features, Drug-Induced Dementia

Page 1 2 Next

Ask a Question

Further Information

Related Condition Support Groups

Dementia