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Dementia with Depressive Features News

Aerobic Exercise May Help Guard Against Dementia

Posted 9 days ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 30, 2016 – Aerobic exercise may strengthen memory and thinking skills in older adults with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), a small study suggests. People with mild cognitive impairment are at increased risk for Alzheimer's disease. The study included 16 people, average age 63, who did aerobic workouts such as on a treadmill, stationary bike or elliptical training. They worked out four times a week for six months. There was also a control group of 19 people, average age 67, who did stretching exercises four times a week for six months but no aerobic activity. All of the participants had mild cognitive impairment. After six months, brain scans revealed that those in the aerobic exercise group had greater increases in brain volume than those in the stretching group, the researchers said. Those in the exercise group also showed significant improvement in thinking and ... Read more

Related support groups: Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Arteriosclerotic Dementia, Drug-Induced Dementia, Lewy Body Dementia, Dementia with Depressive Features

Brain Scans May Improve Dementia Diagnosis, Treatment

Posted 8 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Nov. 8, 2016 – Tens of millions of people worldwide suffer from memory loss and mental impairment due to dementia. While there's no cure, medication may temporarily improve some symptoms. Proper treatment, however, depends on identifying the type of dementia and early detection. A new study shows that MRI brain scans can help doctors tell which people with certain thinking and memory problems might go on to develop dementia with Lewy bodies rather than Alzheimer's disease. The researchers found that scans from people who eventually developed Lewy body dementia showed a lack of shrinkage in a portion of the brain related to memory, known as the hippocampus. "Identifying people with mild cognitive impairment at risk for dementia with Lewy bodies is critical for early interventions with the potential treatments emerging in the field," said study author Dr. Kejal Kantarci. She's a ... Read more

Related support groups: Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Arteriosclerotic Dementia, Lewy Body Dementia, Alcoholic Dementia, Drug-Induced Dementia, Head Imaging, Dementia with Depressive Features

Sudden Drops in Blood Pressure Tied to Higher Odds for Dementia

Posted 11 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Oct. 11, 2016 – There seems to be an association between sudden drops in blood pressure upon standing up – a condition called orthostatic hypotension – and an increased risk for dementia, according to a new study. The study of 6,000 Dutch people could only point to an association between sudden low blood pressure and dementia, and couldn't prove cause-and-effect. However, a geriatrician in the United States said the link is worth investigating. "The study adds to the increasing body of knowledge that links cerebral blood flow to cognitive [thinking] disorders," said Dr. Irving Gomolin, chief of geriatric medicine at Winthrop-University Hospital in Mineola, N.Y. The new study was led by Arfan Ikram and Frank Wolters, of Erasmus Medical Center in the Netherlands. They analyzed 24 years of data from more than 6,000 people and found that those with orthostatic hypotension – low ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Hypertension, Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Hypotension, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Hypertensive Heart Disease, Lewy Body Dementia, Dementia with Depressive Features

Mars-Bound Astronauts Could Face Dementia Risk, Study Contends

Posted 11 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Oct. 11, 2016 – President Barack Obama's declaration Tuesday to send astronauts to Mars and back by the 2030s might come with health risks to the space travelers, a new study suggests. The study, which was done with rodents, suggests that astronauts traveling to Mars could be at risk for developing dementia because of high levels of cosmic ray exposure. It's a condition the study authors have dubbed "space brain." Researchers found that rodents exposed to highly energetic charged particles – similar to galactic cosmic ray exposure faced by astronauts on lengthy space flights – developed long-term brain damage that led to mental impairment and dementia. The effects included significant levels of brain inflammation and damage to neurons, the researchers said. It's important to note, however, that animal studies frequently fail to produce similar results in humans. The rodents ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety, Anxiety and Stress, Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Diagnosis and Investigation, Dementia with Depressive Features

Even a Little Exercise May Help Stave Off Dementia

Posted 26 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Aug. 26, 2016 – Couch potatoes have a higher risk of developing dementia in old age, a new study reports. Seniors who get little to no exercise have a 50 percent greater risk of dementia compared with those who regularly take part in moderate or heavy amounts of physical activity, the researchers found. Moderate physical activity can include walking briskly, bicycling slower than 10 miles an hour, ballroom dancing or gardening, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. "It doesn't require intensive physical activity to decrease risk of dementia," said senior researcher Dr. Zaldy Tan. He is medical director of the Alzheimer's and Dementia Care Program at University of California, Los Angeles. "Even moderate amounts are fine." Study participants aged 75 or older gained the most protective benefit from exercise against the onset of dementia, the findings ... Read more

Related support groups: Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Arteriosclerotic Dementia, Drug-Induced Dementia, Lewy Body Dementia, Dementia with Depressive Features

Calcium Supplements Might Raise Older Women's Dementia Risk

Posted 18 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 17, 2016 – Taking calcium supplements with the hope of keeping osteoporosis at bay may raise an older woman's risk of dementia, a new study suggests. And that seems particularly true if a woman has already sustained an event causing poor blood flow to the brain (cerebrovascular disease), such as from a stroke, researchers said. The study can't prove cause-and-effect. However, dementia risk was seven times higher in female stroke survivors who took calcium supplements, compared to women with a history of stroke who didn't use the supplements, the findings showed. The risk of dementia also was three times higher in women with white matter brain lesions who took calcium supplements, compared to women with white matter lesions who didn't take the supplements. Lesions in white matter tissue are evidence of a mini-stroke or some other problem impeding blood flow within the ... Read more

Related support groups: Osteoporosis, Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Fracture, bone, Prevention of Osteoporosis, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Caltrate 600 with D, Calcium/Vitamin D, Citracal + D, Oysco 500 with D, Citracal Petites, Oyster Shell Calcium, Citracal Creamy Bites, Calcet, Calcium 600 D, Calcarb with D, Calcio Del Mar, Focalgin-B, Dical-D, Caltrate Colon Health

Acupuncture May Slow Pre-Dementia Memory Loss: Study

Posted 5 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Aug. 4, 2016 – Acupuncture may benefit people who have memory loss, but don't yet have dementia, suggests a review by Chinese researchers of five earlier studies. Nothing has yet been proven to halt the progression to dementia in those who are destined to progress. But, acupuncture used alone or along with another treatment, such as the medication nimodipine, might help retain some memory function, the researchers said. But several doctors not involved with the review said it was too soon to say that acupuncture might be effective against dementia. For the study, Min Deng and Xu-Feng Wang, from Wuhan University in China, reviewed five previously published studies done in 2012 and 2013. The trials included nearly 600 people with mild cognitive impairment, a type of memory loss that's considered pre-dementia. About 5 percent to 10 percent of people with mild cognitive ... Read more

Related support groups: Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Arteriosclerotic Dementia, Lewy Body Dementia, Alcoholic Dementia, Drug-Induced Dementia, Arteriosclerotic Dementia w/ Depressive Features, Dementia with Depressive Features

2 in 10 Alzheimer's Cases May Be Misdiagnosed

Posted 26 Jul 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, July 26, 2016 – Alzheimer's disease is often misdiagnosed, possibly causing undue stress for those who don't have the disease but are told they do, and delays in treatment for others, two new studies reveal. Although no cure or effective treatment for Alzheimer's disease exists, a correct diagnosis is essential because some drugs can delay its progress and help preserve quality of life for as long as possible. An early diagnosis also gives patients time to plan for their end-of-life care, experts say. "There are drugs that are beneficial for at least a short amount of time that can be given at a very early stage and possibly boost memory," said Dean Hartley, director of science initiatives, medical and scientific relations at the Alzheimer's Association. "Planning your care and finances is extremely important," he said. "With a correct diagnosis people can also be put into a ... Read more

Related support groups: Parkinson's Disease, Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Arteriosclerotic Dementia, Diagnosis and Investigation, Lewy Body Dementia, Alcoholic Dementia, Arteriosclerotic Dementia w/ Depressive Features, Drug-Induced Dementia, Dementia with Depressive Features

Does Dementia Diagnosis Have Silver Lining for Some?

Posted 26 Jul 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, July 26, 2016 – Is it possible that a diagnosis as devastating as dementia could have some positive effects? Yes, a small study suggests. Researchers asked 48 people with early dementia or mild cognitive impairment to complete a questionnaire that measured their quality of life and personal outlook after getting their diagnosis. The "Silver Lining Questionnaire" was designed to measure how much patients believe their illness has a positive impact in areas such as: relationships, appreciation for life, positive influence on others, inner strength and life philosophy. The questionnaire has been used before with cancer patients. But, this was the first time it was used with dementia/mild cognitive impairment patients, the researchers said. "The overall assumption is that this diagnosis would have a uniformly negative impact on a patient's outlook on life, but we were surprised to ... Read more

Related support groups: Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Arteriosclerotic Dementia, Diagnosis and Investigation, Dementia with Depressive Features, Arteriosclerotic Dementia w/ Depressive Features, Lewy Body Dementia, Alcoholic Dementia, Drug-Induced Dementia

'Managing' Elderly Patients Without Powerful Antipsychotics

Posted 26 Jul 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, July 25, 2016 – About 25 percent of dementia patients in U.S. nursing homes are still quieted with risky antipsychotic medications. Now, a small study suggests that managing these difficult patients, instead of medicating them, could obtain better results. "Drugs have a place, but should not be first-line treatments. They don't work well, and there are side effects," said study author Dr. Henry Brodaty, a professor of aging and mental health at the University of New South Wales in Sydney, Australia. Antipsychotic drugs such as Risperdal (risperidone), Abilify (aripiprazole) and Seroquel (quetiapine) are approved to treat serious psychiatric conditions such as bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. But in seniors, they're often used to calm aggressive or violent behavior linked to dementia. "They're basically a sedative," said Dean Hartley, director of science initiatives with the ... Read more

Related support groups: Bipolar Disorder, Seroquel, Abilify, Schizophrenia, Mania, Latuda, Zyprexa, Risperdal, Risperidone, Schizoaffective Disorder, Dementia, Geodon, Saphris, Quetiapine, Seroquel XR, Alzheimer's Disease, Olanzapine, Invega, Clozapine, Rexulti

Why Some Seniors Don't Take Their Meds

Posted 1 Jul 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, June 30, 2016 – Anyone who's helped care for an aging loved one knows that managing their daily medications can be a challenge. Now, new research suggests that the problem of missed pills rises with age and failing memory, especially for men. The problem can have serious consequences, the study's lead author noted. "Health conditions may worsen or not improve if older adults skip or don't take their medications properly," said Brenda Jamerson, of the Center on Biobehavioral Health Disparities Research at Duke University, in Durham, N.C. "Serious side effects may also occur from taking medications at the wrong time or in the wrong dose," Jamerson said in a news release from the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, which published the findings earlier this month. The research involved more than 4,100 North Carolina residents aged 65 and older. All had health conditions ... Read more

Related support groups: Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Arteriosclerotic Dementia, Lewy Body Dementia, Alcoholic Dementia, Drug-Induced Dementia, Arteriosclerotic Dementia w/ Depressive Features, Dementia with Depressive Features

Memory Loss: Normal or a Sign of Trouble?

Posted 1 Jul 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, June 30, 2016 – Mild memory lapses such as forgetting where you put your keys or reading glasses, though worrisome, are normal, experts say. But certain memory problems – such as putting your car keys in the fridge – may indicate a more serious issue. So, what kind of memory issue suggests the need for a medical assessment? Some examples include: memory loss that disrupts daily activities such as balancing a checkbook, maintaining personal hygiene and driving; or frequent memory lapses such as regularly forgetting appointments or where you parked your car, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) said in a news release. Other warning signs include forgetting whole conversations, forgetting the names of relatives or close friends, frequently repeating yourself, or asking the same questions in the same conversation. Another red flag is memory loss that's getting worse over ... Read more

Related support groups: Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Diagnosis and Investigation, Dementia with Depressive Features

Type of Disease May Dictate End-of-Life Care

Posted 27 Jun 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, June 27, 2016 – Patients who have cancer or dementia tend to receive more end-of-life care than those dying from other conditions, a new study of Veteran Affairs hospitals finds. The study also found that fewer cancer and dementia patients died in intensive care units, because these patients had more palliative care and end-of-life planning, such as do-not-resuscitate orders, than people with other serious illnesses. Those other illnesses included end-stage kidney disease, heart failure, lung disease or frailty, researchers said. "Historically, efforts to improve end-of-life care have focused on cancer and more recently on dementia," said lead researcher Dr. Melissa Wachterman. She is an assistant professor of medicine at the VA Boston Healthcare System and Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston. "We really do need to expand efforts to improve care to other patients that haven't ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Dementia with Depressive Features, Drug-Induced Dementia

Delays in Spotting Dementia Can Bring Dangers

Posted 2 Jun 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, June 2, 2016 – A delay in diagnosing dementia can put people at risk, a new study suggests. People who have signs of probable dementia but haven't yet been formally diagnosed are nearly twice as likely as those who've been diagnosed to be performing potentially unsafe activities such as cooking, driving, and managing their medications and finances. The study included information from more than 7,600 Americans. All were 65 or older. The findings showed: About 17 percent of people diagnosed with dementia and 28 percent of undiagnosed people were still driving. Twelve percent of diagnosed people and 29 percent of undiagnosed people kept handling their finances. Seventeen percent of diagnosed people and 42 percent of undiagnosed people continued to cook meals for themselves. Nearly 22 percent of diagnosed people and 50 percent of undiagnosed people were still handling their own ... Read more

Related support groups: Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Arteriosclerotic Dementia, Diagnosis and Investigation, Drug-Induced Dementia, Arteriosclerotic Dementia w/ Depressive Features, Lewy Body Dementia, Dementia with Depressive Features

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