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Try Home Remedies for Child's Cough or Cold

Posted 6 Jan 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Jan. 5, 2016 – Instead of turning to over-the-counter cough and cold remedies, parents should consider treating their children with home remedies, says a leading group of U.S. pediatricians. Like all medications, even cold and could remedies available without a prescription can cause serious side effects in young children, the American Academy of Pediatrics cautions. Because of the risks, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in 2008 recommended that children younger than 4 years old never be treated with over-the-counter cough and cold medicines. Children between 4 and 6 years old should only take these remedies under the direction of their doctor, the academy said in a news release. But children older than 6 can safely take over-the-counter drugs if the dosage instructions on the package are followed correctly. There are safer, more convenient and less costly ways to provide ... Read more

Related support groups: Hydrocodone, Cough, Codeine, Influenza, Cold Symptoms, NyQuil, Dry Cough, Mucinex DM, Dextromethorphan, Benzonatate, Sore Throat, Alka-Seltzer, Cough and Nasal Congestion, DayQuil, Delsym, Daytime, Bromfed DM, C-Phen DM, Tylenol Cold, Tessalon

Health Tip: Who Gets Pneumonia?

Posted 3 Dec 2015 by Drugs.com

-- Anyone can get pneumonia, but your age and general health are risk factors for the dangerous infection. The National Heart Lung and Blood Institute says other risk factors include: Being a child under age 2. The immune systems of young children are still developing. Being an adult over age 65. Having asthma, bronchitis or COPD. Having cystic fibrosis. Having a weakened immune system. Having sickle cell anemia, diabetes or heart failure. Having trouble coughing, following a stroke. Being in a hospital's intensive care unit, especially if on a ventilator. Having had the flu recently. Smoking or alcohol abuse. Read more

Related support groups: Hydrocodone, Cough, Codeine, Sinusitis, Pneumonia, Cold Symptoms, Upper Respiratory Tract Infection, Dry Cough, Dextromethorphan, Benzonatate, Sore Throat, Cough and Nasal Congestion, Delsym, Tessalon, Tessalon Perles, Respiratory Tract Disease, Hysingla ER, Aspiration Pneumonia, Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Zohydro ER

That Lingering Cough Could Be Bronchitis

Posted 21 May 2015 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, May 21, 2015 – If you have a cold that lasts a long time or a persistent cough, you could have bronchitis and should see a doctor, a doctor says. "We see a lot of cases of bronchitis at our immediate care centers," said Dr. Khalilah Babino, an assistant professor of family Medicine at Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine. Although most cases are caused by the common cold virus or influenza virus, bronchitis can lead to more serious conditions, such as pneumonia, which require medical treatment, she added. Symptoms of bronchitis – a serious disorder of the lower respiratory tract – include fever, chills, chest congestion and productive cough that lasts more than five days, Babino said. "The cough can last two to three weeks and could be an indicator of a more serious condition. If symptoms persist for more than seven to 10 days or symptoms start to get worse, ... Read more

Related support groups: Hydrocodone, Cough, Codeine, Bronchitis, Mucinex, Pneumonia, Guaifenesin, Dry Cough, Dextromethorphan, Robitussin, Benzonatate, Cough and Nasal Congestion, Delsym, Tussin, Tessalon, Acetylcysteine, Tessalon Perles, Mucomyst, Potassium Iodide, NAC

Avoid Medication Overdoses in Children

Posted 27 Mar 2015 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, March 27, 2015 – Medications for children – even those you can buy over-the-counter – can be dangerous if a child is given too much, one expert says. That's why pharmacist Sheila Goertemoeller, of the Cincinnati Drug and Poison Information Center, wants parents and other caregivers to know how to safely administer these drugs. Before giving medication to children, parents should carefully read the instructions first and use the appropriate measuring device to prevent accidental overdoses, cautioned Goertemoeller. These precautions are especially important if you're giving medicine to a sick child in the middle of the night, Goertemoeller noted. Dosing errors are made by 41 percent of parents, according to research from the American Academy of Pediatrics. Just taking a few minutes to turn on a light and read the directions will help ensure children get the right amount, ... Read more

Related support groups: Percocet, Vicodin, Norco, Lortab, Tylenol, Benadryl, Acetaminophen, Sta-D, Diphenhydramine, Paracetamol, Fioricet, Excedrin, Endocet, Darvocet-N 100, NyQuil, Tylenol PM, Dry Cough, Acetaminophen/Hydrocodone, Mucinex DM, Phenylephrine

Health Tip: When Food and Drugs Interact

Posted 27 Feb 2014 by Drugs.com

-- When food and drinks interact with medication, the medication may not work sufficiently or the drug can become too powerful as the body has trouble handling it properly. The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics mentions these common examples of food and drug interaction: Grapefruit juice interacts with several drugs and may affect the way the body metabolizes medication. Drugs that may interact with grapefruit juice include: some statins, antihistamines, thyroid medications, blood pressure medications, birth control pills, cough suppressants and medications that block stomach acids. Blood-thinning medications can interact with leafy green vegetables, affecting the blood's clotting ability. Natural black licorice may interact with certain blood pressure medications and blood-thinning medications. Salt substitutes can interact with ACE inhibitors and digoxin. Tyramine (found in foods ... Read more

Related support groups: Plan B, Hydrocodone, Mirena, Sprintec, NuvaRing, Provera, Nexplanon, Implanon, Depo-Provera, Codeine, Ortho Tri-Cyclen, Tri-Sprintec, Yasmin, Microgestin Fe 1/20, Amlodipine, Loestrin 24 Fe, Ortho Evra, Plan B One-Step, TriNessa, Lutera

Fewer ER Visits for Kids After Cold Medicine Restrictions

Posted 11 Nov 2013 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Nov. 11 – Restrictions placed on cough and cold medicines may be working, with fewer young children ending up in the ER because of bad side effects tied to the drugs, new research shows. The drop in kids' illnesses came about after drug manufacturers voluntarily withdrew cough and cold medications for this age group from the market in 2007, and after drug labeling changes put in place in 2008. The labeling changes advised that the products were not for use in children under 4. "The change [in ER admissions] was associated with those two events," said study author Dr. Lee Hamilton, a medical officer in the division of healthcare quality promotion at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. "We saw that in children under 2 years old, adverse events from cough and cold medicines dropped from one in 25 of all emergency department visits for adverse drug events to about ... Read more

Related support groups: Sta-D, Cold Symptoms, NyQuil, Dry Cough, Phenylephrine, Mucinex DM, Dextromethorphan, Alka-Seltzer, DayQuil, Delsym, Daytime, Bromfed, Bromfed DM, C-Phen DM, Tylenol Cold, Rondec, Tussin DM, Promethazine DM, Rondec-DM, C-Phen DM Drops

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