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Delivery News

Pregnant Women Still Getting UTI Meds Linked to Birth Defects

Posted 5 days ago by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Jan. 12, 2018 – Urinary tract infections (UTIs) can be problematic for pregnant women and their babies, but so can two antibiotics used to treat these infections, U.S. health officials warn. The antibiotics – trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (Bactrim) and nitrofurantoin (Macrobid) – have been linked to a small risk for birth defects in pregnant women when given in the first trimester. Despite the risk, many pregnant women are still getting these antibiotics, according to a new report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. "Birth defects associated with these drugs include heart, brain and facial defects," said Elizabeth Ailes, a health scientist at the CDC and lead author of the report. A 3 percent risk of birth defects is associated with all pregnancies, she said. "The increased risks associated with these antibiotics is relatively small, but significant – ... Read more

Related support groups: Bactrim, Trimethoprim, Nitrofurantoin, Sulfamethoxazole, Macrobid, Bactrim DS, Sulfamethoxazole/Trimethoprim, Delivery, Macrodantin, Septra, Premature Labor, SMZ-TMP DS, Septra DS, Sulfatrim, Cotrimoxazole, Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation during Pregnancy/Lactation, Polytrim, Polymyxin B/Trimethoprim, Sulfatrim Pediatric, Cotrim

Serena Williams Shares Childbirth Ordeal

Posted 6 days ago by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Jan. 11, 2018 – Though Serena Williams commands the tennis court with ease when she plays, life-threatening complications following the birth of her daughter sidelined her for six weeks. Williams tells the story of her medical ordeal in the latest issue of Vogue, published Wednesday. After an easy pregnancy, things turned precarious when she had to have an emergency C-section because the baby's heart rate was dropping rapidly during contractions. The C-section went off without a hitch and her daughter, Olympia, was born on Sept. 1. But what followed was far from smooth, Williams told the magazine. The next day, Williams suddenly felt short of breath. Having suffered a pulmonary embolism in 2011 following a fall, Williams knew in her bones what was wrong. She had a history of blood clots in her lungs and she had been taken off blood thinners before delivery, so she did not ... Read more

Related support groups: Bleeding Disorder, Delivery, Cesarean Section, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Acetaminophen in Pregnancy Tied to Language Delays -- in Baby Girls

Posted 7 days ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 10, 2018 – Toddlers whose mothers used acetaminophen – best known as Tylenol – early in pregnancy may have a heightened risk of language delays, a new study suggests. Researchers found that when moms-to-be used the painkiller during the first trimester, their daughters were more likely to have language delays at age 2.5 years. No such link was seen among boys, however. A "language delay" meant the child was using fewer than 50 words, according to the report. The study is the latest to link prenatal acetaminophen to developmental issues. Experts, however, said the findings do not prove the blame lies with acetaminophen. But they also said pregnant women should use the drug only when necessary – to bring down a fever, for example, since a high temperature can be dangerous for the fetus. "This medication should probably be used only with caution, and limited to absolute ... Read more

Related support groups: Birth Control, Contraception, Percocet, Vicodin, Norco, Lortab, Tylenol, Acetaminophen, Excedrin, Paracetamol, Fioricet, Endocet, Darvocet-N 100, Tylenol PM, Acetaminophen/Hydrocodone, Delivery, Percocet 10/325, Tylenol with Codeine, DayQuil, Tylenol with Codeine 3

Too Many Babies Still Die Needlessly of SIDS, CDC Says

Posted 8 days ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Jan. 9, 2018 – Many parents still regularly risk their babies' lives as they put them to bed, according to a new report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Analyzing data from the states, the CDC found that parents continue to practice unsafe habits that have been associated with sleep-related infant deaths, including sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). For instance: One in 5 mothers says she places her baby to sleep on his or her side or stomach. Two in 5 leave loose bedding and soft objects in the baby's sleep area, most often bumper pads and thick blankets. Three in 5 sometimes share their bed with their baby. These practices contribute to about 3,500 sleep-related deaths of U.S. babies every year, according to the CDC. "Unfortunately, this report reveals that unsafe sleep practices are common," said Dr. Brenda Fitzgerald, the CDC director. "We need ... Read more

Related support groups: Delivery, Premature Labor, Cesarean Section, Apnea of Prematurity, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Child Death Rate Higher in U.S. Than Other Wealthy Nations

Posted 9 days ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Jan. 8, 2018 – The United States has had the smallest decline in child death rates among wealthy nations over the past 50 years, despite spending more on health care per child than the other countries, a new study finds. Researchers analyzed child death rates from 1961 to 2010 in the United States and 19 other economically similar countries, including Canada, Australia, Germany, Italy and Switzerland. All of the countries registered a reduction in the death rate among children. But the rate in the United States has been slowest to decline and has been higher than in the other 19 countries since the 1980s, the findings showed. Over the 50-year study period, the slower reduction in the U.S. child death rate has resulted in more than 600,000 excess deaths, according to the study. In all of the countries, about 90 percent of child deaths occurred among infants and older teens (aged ... Read more

Related support groups: Delivery, Premature Labor, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy

Special Baby Formula Doesn't Seem to Prevent Type 1 Diabetes

Posted 15 days ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Jan. 2, 2018 – A specially prepared baby formula does not protect children with a genetically high risk for type 1 diabetes, according to new research. The study focused on babies born to families in which one person already had the disease. Earlier research suggested that feeding such at-risk babies a standard formula of normal cow milk might increase their eventual risk for developing diabetes. This led to the theory that the culprit might be the complex protein structure found in standard cow's milk. The new study tested whether delaying babies' exposure to these complex proteins might decrease the risk for developing type 1 diabetes. Nearly 2,200 infants from 15 countries were included in the study. All of the babies faced a genetically high risk for type 1 diabetes. The study was led by Mikael Knip from the University of Helsinki, in Finland. After the infants' initial ... Read more

Related support groups: Diabetes, Type 1, Delivery, Premature Labor, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Health Tip: Ways to Bond With Baby

Posted 15 days ago by Drugs.com

-- Early encounters between parents and a newborn help the infant feel more secure. The time it takes to bond varies from a few hours to a few weeks. The U.S. National Library of Medicine suggests how to promote bonding between you and baby: If you chose to breast-feed, your baby will identify with your smell and touch during feedings. If you bottle feed, your baby can become acquainted with your smell and touch, as well. Hold baby skin-to-skin when you can. Make eye contact with baby. Respond to baby when he or she cries. Play with baby. Talk, read and sing to baby to help him or her become acquainted with the sound of your voice. Read more

Related support groups: Birth Control, Contraception, Delivery, Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation during Pregnancy/Lactation, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Cervical Device May Help Lower Preemie Birth Risk

Posted 19 Dec 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Dec. 19, 2017 – Women with a relatively short cervix are at higher risk of preterm delivery, but new research shows that a cervical device may cut that risk substantially. The Italian study included 300 women with a short cervix. Half of them used a small silicone ring called a cervical pessary, while the other half acted as a "control" group and did not use the device. A cervical pessary is designed to keep the cervix closed and to change the inclination of the cervical canal. Previous findings about the effectiveness of the device have been contradictory, the researchers noted. In this study, women who used the cervical device had about half the risk of preterm birth – defined as delivery at less than 34 weeks of pregnancy – compared to women in the control group. Women who used the pessary also tended to deliver larger, healthier babies that did not require neonatal ICU ... Read more

Related support groups: Delivery, Premature Labor, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy

Is Air Pollution a Threat to a Fetus?

Posted 11 Dec 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Dec. 11, 2017 – Women who are exposed to air pollution right before or after they become pregnant may be more likely to have a baby with birth defects, new research suggests. The increased risk is modest, but scientists say their findings warrant more investigation since all pregnant women are exposed to some level of pollution. "The most susceptible time of exposure appears to be the one month before and after conception," said study senior author Dr. Emily DeFranco, a physician at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center. "Public health efforts should continue to highlight the importance of minimizing population-level exposure to harmful particulate matter in the air," she added in a hospital news release. For the study, the researchers investigated the effects of fine particulate matter – tiny particles and droplets of liquid that get into the air. Once inhaled, they ... Read more

Related support groups: Delivery, Brain Anomalies incl Congenital, Cesarean Section, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Breathing Trouble May Follow Preemies to Adulthood

Posted 1 Dec 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Dec. 1, 2017 – People who were born prematurely may have smaller-than-normal airways in adulthood, which can cause respiratory problems, researchers say. Premature birth is associated with poorer heart and lung function, but the reasons why have not been fully understood. In a new study, investigators compared adults who were born eight weeks or more early with people who were born at full-term. Both groups were the same age and height. The researchers used lung function tests to calculate the airway size of each study participant, and concluded that airway size in the premature group was smaller than in the full-term group. "Our study might suggest that respiratory treatments would be less effective in individuals born prematurely, but more work needs to be done to directly test this," said study author Joseph Duke. He's an assistant professor at Northern Arizona University. ... Read more

Related support groups: Delivery, Premature Labor, Respiratory Tract Disease, Cesarean Section, Apnea of Prematurity, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Lock Eyes With Your Baby, Synchronize Brain Waves?

Posted 1 Dec 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Dec. 1, 2017 – Gazing at your baby may do more than strengthen that bond with your newborn, a new study suggests. Eye contact between parents and their infants actually helps synchronize their brain waves, researchers report. "When the adult and infant are looking at each other, they are signaling their availability and intention to communicate with each other. We found that both adult and infant brains respond to a gaze signal by becoming more in sync with their partner," said study lead author Victoria Leong. She's an affiliated lecturer in the department of psychology at Cambridge University in England. "This mechanism could prepare parents and babies to communicate, by synchronizing when to speak and when to listen, which would also make learning more effective," Leong said in a university news release. Previous studies have shown that when parents and their infants ... Read more

Related support groups: Delivery, Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation during Pregnancy/Lactation, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Newborns in Pain Might Not Show It

Posted 30 Nov 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Nov. 30, 2017 – Just because your newborn isn't a crybaby doesn't mean he doesn't feel pain, new research suggests. Newborns display a stronger brain response to pain when they're under stress, but it isn't reflected in their behavior, British researchers found. For the study, the investigators monitored brain activity and facial expressions of 56 healthy newborns to assess their response to the pain of a medically necessary heel stick. Those with higher levels of background stress – as determined by heart rate and levels of a stress hormone in saliva – had more brain activity in reaction to the pain. But that didn't seem to trigger a change in their behavior. The study was published Nov. 30 in the journal Current Biology. "When newborn babies experience a painful procedure, there is a reasonably well-coordinated increase in their brain activity and their behavioral ... Read more

Related support groups: Pain, Delivery, Pain/Fever, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Hospital Midwives, Lower C-Section Rates?

Posted 16 Nov 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Nov. 16, 2017 – Expectant mothers seeking to lower their risk of a cesarean delivery might want to consider getting a midwife involved, a new study suggests. In addition, midwives were tied to less need for a surgical incision called an episiotomy during childbirth, the researchers reported. "More midwife-attended births may correlate with fewer obstetric procedures, which could lower costs without lowering the quality of care," wrote study co-authors Laura Attanasio, of the University of Massachusetts Amherst, and Katy Kozhimannil of the University of Minnesota School of Public Health. The study findings are based on 126 hospitals in New York state. About 25 percent of those hospitals had no midwives. About half had midwives, but they attended less than 15 percent of births. At 7 percent of the hospitals, however, midwives attended more than four out of 10 births, according ... Read more

Related support groups: Delivery, Premature Labor, Labor Induction, Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation during Pregnancy/Lactation, Labor Pain, Cervical Ripening, Cesarean Section, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Weighing Too Much or Too Little When Pregnant Can Be Risky

Posted 14 Nov 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Nov. 14, 2017 – For women contemplating having a baby, new research adds to the evidence suggesting that starting a pregnancy at a normal weight is best. The study found that too much or even too little weight increases an expectant mom's risk for severe illnesses and death. "Not only for baby's sake, but also for your own sake, have a healthy diet and get regular exercise before pregnancy," said study lead author Dr. Sarka Lisonkova. She's an assistant professor in the department of obstetrics and gynecology at the University of British Columbia and the Children's and Women's Health Centre in Vancouver. "It's never too late, even if you're already pregnant," Lisonkova said, adding that weight gain during pregnancy can also increase the risk for severe illnesses and even death in expectant mothers. The study, published Nov. 14 in Journal of the American Medical Association, ... Read more

Related support groups: Birth Control, Contraception, Obesity, Weight Loss, Female Infertility, Delivery, Ovulation Induction, Premature Labor, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Health Tip: Supporting Breast-feeding Moms on the Job

Posted 3 Nov 2017 by Drugs.com

-- There are a number of options available if businesses want to make it more convenient for mothers to express breast milk at work. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services suggests: Find a devoted space for nursing mothers. If a mother has a safe and private place to pump, she will not have to go elsewhere, such as a car or home. This space requires a comfortable chair, a place for a breast pump and an electrical outlet. If you do not have room for a dedicated area, consider sharing space with other nearby businesses. Many women have their own breast pumps, since insurance plans often cover them. But some businesses buy hospital-grade pumps for employees. These devices may speed up the pumping process and prevent the need for a mother to carry a pump back and forth from home. Ensure that there is adequate refrigeration for nursing mothers. Read more

Related support groups: Delivery, Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation during Pregnancy/Lactation, Cesarean Section, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation, Lactation Augmentation

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