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Health Tip: Asthma and Air Pollution

Posted 6 Apr 2017 by Drugs.com

-- Air pollution makes the air unhealthy – a particularly serious problem for people with asthma. The American Academy of Family Physicians says you should talk with your doctor about: Symptoms of exposure to air pollution, which could include chest pain and coughing. Long-term medication to manage asthma. Whether you are more sensitive to polluted air than the average person. Read more

Related support groups: Bronchitis, Dyspnea, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Acute, Bronchiectasis, Respiratory Tract Disease, Croup

City Tax on Cars Cut Pollution, Kids' Asthma Risk

Posted 7 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, March 7, 2017 – A tax designed to reduce mid-city traffic in Stockholm, Sweden, was tied to a reduction in asthma attacks in children, a new study suggests. "The key takeaways of this paper are that health gains can be realized through efforts to lower air pollution, and that we need to be patient in waiting for the complete picture to emerge," said study author Emilia Simeonova, an assistant professor at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore. After Stockholm introduced the "congestion tax" as an experiment in 2006 to discourage people from driving in the center of the city, traffic flow got better and air pollution levels fell by 5 to 10 percent. The tax was made into law in 2007. The tax costs drivers the U.S. equivalent of $2.60 when they drive in certain areas of the city at congested times of the workday. The tax is collected through scanners that gather license plate ... Read more

Related support groups: Cough, Asthma, Bronchitis, Asthma - Maintenance, Asthma - Acute, Bronchiectasis, Bronchospasm Prophylaxis, Respiratory Tract Disease, Croup, Allergic Asthma, Reversible Airways Disease, Bronchospastic Disease

Can Mom's Vitamin E Head Off Child's Asthma Risk?

Posted 5 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

SATURDAY, March 4, 2017 – Kids born to moms with low levels of vitamin E might be more likely to develop asthma, new research suggests. When moms had low levels of a specific type of vitamin E measured right after birth, their children were more likely to develop wheezing and to have been treated with asthma medications in their first two years of life, the study found. "The major sources of vitamin E are oils" such as sunflower, safflower, corn, soy and canola oils, study lead author Dr. Cosby Stone said in a news release from the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology (AAAAI). Stone said his team's previous research in mice had suggested the link between vitamin E and asthma. Stone is with Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville. "We hypothesized that maternal vitamin E levels, reflecting levels that the fetus encounters during pregnancy," would affect how kids ... Read more

Related support groups: Cough, Asthma, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Bronchitis, Asthma - Maintenance, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Maintenance, Dyspnea, Asthma - Acute, Cough and Nasal Congestion, Vitamin E, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Acute, Bronchiectasis, Respiratory Tract Disease, Croup, Allergic Asthma, Alpha E, Aquasol E, E Pherol, Aqua Gem-E, Nutr-E-Sol

Flu Shot May Curb Respiratory Infections in People With Heart Failure

Posted 2 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Feb. 2, 2017 – Flu and pneumonia vaccines may reduce heart failure patients' risk of dangerous respiratory infections, a new review suggests. More than 5 million Americans have heart failure, when the heart is too weak to pump enough blood to meet the body's needs. Respiratory infections are the leading cause of hospitalization for people with heart failure. These infections are associated with high death rates in a hospital, the review authors said. The researchers reviewed studies published from January 1990 to July 2016. These studies suggested that flu and pneumonia vaccines seem to help protect people with heart failure from life-threatening respiratory infections. People older than 65 with heart failure may benefit more from high-dose vaccination, the researchers said. "Vaccination represents a low-cost intervention that may be able to prevent the significant disease, ... Read more

Related support groups: Influenza, Pneumonia, Heart Failure, Congestive Heart Failure, Upper Respiratory Tract Infection, Left Ventricular Dysfunction, Prevnar 13, Respiratory Tract Disease, Croup, FluLaval, Pneumovax 23, Afluria, Pneumococcal 23-polyvalent Vaccine, Pneumococcal Disease Prophylaxis, Fluzone, FluMist, Flucelvax, Influenza Virus Vaccine, Inactivated, Vaccination and Prophlaxis, Influenza Prophylaxis

Can Air Pollution Heighten Alzheimer's Risk?

Posted 1 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 1, 2017 – Air pollution may cause more than just lung disease: New research suggests that if tiny particles in the air from power plants and cars are inhaled, they might also invade the brain, increasing the risk for dementia. "Although the link between air pollution and Alzheimer's disease is a new scientific frontier, we now have evidence that air pollution, like tobacco, is dangerous to the aging brain," said study co-senior author Caleb Finch. He's with the University of Southern California's (USC) Leonard Davis School of Gerontology. For the study, the USC scientists collected samples of air particles with technology designed by university engineers. The researchers used the technology to expose female mice to air pollution. "Our state-of-the-art aerosol technologies, called particle concentrators, essentially take the air of a typical urban area and convert it to ... Read more

Related support groups: Cough, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Bronchitis, Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Dyspnea, Cough and Nasal Congestion, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Bronchiectasis, Respiratory Tract Disease, Croup, Dementia with Depressive Features, Reversible Airways Disease, Alcoholic Dementia, Drug-Induced Dementia, Lewy Body Dementia

How to Spot a Common, Potentially Dangerous, Childhood Illness

Posted 12 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 11, 2017 – Nearly all children get respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) by age 2. But just because the infection is common doesn't mean it should be taken lightly, one nursing specialist warns. Symptoms of this lung and respiratory infection – coughing, sneezing and a runny nose – are often mistaken for a cold, according to Alison Pittman, clinical assistant professor at Texas A&M College of Nursing. "Most healthy children will experience cold-like symptoms, but it can easily spread to babies with pre-existing conditions," and put them at risk for serious health problems, she said in a college news release. Those at greatest risk for a severe infection include premature babies, children born with heart or lung problems, and people of any age who have weakened immune systems. Most babies with RSV develop a cough, runny nose and other cold-like symptoms for one to two ... Read more

Related support groups: Influenza, Cold Symptoms, Dyspnea, Sore Throat, Respiratory Tract Disease, Croup, Respiratory Syncytial Virus, Vaccination and Prophlaxis

How to Exercise Safely in Smog

Posted 11 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Nov. 11, 2016 – Scientists say they have figured out the ideal speeds for cyclists and pedestrians to move in order to limit their inhalation of air pollution and still get the full benefits of exercise. "The faster you move, the harder you breathe and the more pollution you could potentially inhale, but you also are exposed to traffic for a shorter period of time. This analysis shows where the sweet spot is," study author Alex Bigazzi, a transportation expert at the University of British Columbia, said in a school news release. The researchers used a computer model of 10,000 people. The investigators found that cyclists should ride between 7.5 to 12.4 miles per hour on city roads. And, pedestrians should walk between 1.2 and 3.7 miles per hour. There are different recommended speeds depending on gender, age and road grades. For example, on flat roads the ideal speeds are: 7.8 ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Cough, Asthma, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Weight Loss, Bronchitis, Upper Respiratory Tract Infection, Dyspnea, Sore Throat, Cough and Nasal Congestion, Bronchiectasis, Bronchospasm Prophylaxis, Respiratory Tract Disease, Croup, Bronchospastic Disease, Reversible Airways Disease

As Traffic Piles Up, So Does Air Pollution

Posted 12 Sep 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Sept. 12, 2016 – Stuck in traffic? Shut your car windows and turn your ventilation system to re-circulate air, researchers advise. Doing so can reduce your exposure to toxic air pollution from a traffic jam by up to 76 percent, a new study suggests. "Where possible and with weather conditions allowing, it is one of the best ways to limit your exposure by keeping windows shut, fans turned off and to try and increase the distance between you and the car in front while in traffic jams or stationary at traffic lights," said study senior author Prashant Kumar. "If the fan or heater needs to be on, the best setting would be to have the air re-circulating within the car without drawing in air from outdoors," Kumar, who's with the University of Surrey in England, said in a university news release. The investigators also found that pedestrians are exposed to high levels of vehicle air ... Read more

Related support groups: Cough, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Bronchitis, Dyspnea, Cough and Nasal Congestion, Bronchiectasis, Respiratory Tract Disease, Croup

Doctors' Decision-Making Tool Could Cut Unnecessary Antibiotic Use

Posted 2 Sep 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Sept. 2, 2016 – A new decision-making tool for doctors may help reduce unnecessary use of antibiotics in children with respiratory tract infections and cough, researchers report. Respiratory tract infections with cough are the most common reason children are prescribed antibiotics. But as many as one-third of those prescriptions may be unnecessary, the study authors said. Using information from more than 8,000 children, the investigators identified seven key predictors that could be used to help determine whether a child with a respiratory tract infection and cough is likely to require antibiotics. Those predictors are: short illness (less than three days); fever of 100 F or higher; younger than 2 years old; respiratory distress; wheeze; asthma; and moderate/severe vomiting in the previous 24 hours. Children with none, or just one, of these predictors are at very low risk of ... Read more

Related support groups: Cough, Cough and Nasal Congestion, Respiratory Tract Disease, Croup, Reversible Airways Disease

Clean Pools Can Still Pose Health Hazards

Posted 2 Jun 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, June 2, 2016 – Nothing seems better on a hot day than hopping into a cool swimming pool. But, new research might prompt you to shower first and make sure your kids don't pee in the water. Researchers from the University of South Carolina report that the disinfectants used to keep pools clean can create dangerous disinfection byproducts (DBPs) when combined with sweat, personal care products and urine. Some of these byproducts have caused genetic damage to cells in laboratory tests, while other reports have found higher rates of bladder cancer and respiratory issues in people who are around pools regularly, the researchers said. And though the study findings held true for public pools, private pools and hot tubs, the researchers flagged indoor pools and hot tubs as a top concern, too. "I never had my kids on a swim team in an indoor pool, swimming every day. I would make that ... Read more

Related support groups: Cough, Asthma, Sinusitis, Cold Symptoms, Upper Respiratory Tract Infection, Sore Throat, Cough and Nasal Congestion, Rhinitis, Respiratory Tract Disease, Croup, Vasomotor Rhinitis

Health Tip: Breathe Healthier Air at Home

Posted 27 May 2016 by Drugs.com

-- To help prevent breathing problems, keep the air inside your home clean. The American Lung Association recommends: Allowing no one to smoke inside your home. Performing a radon test to check for the invisible gas, which has been linked to lung cancer. Running a dehumidifier or air conditioner to keep humidity levels below 50 percent. Keep the filters inside those appliances clean. Repairing any leaking water pipes immediately. Keeping pests away by cleaning up food spills and storing food properly. Never using an outdoor wood burning stove inside the home. Finding the source of odors and cleaning them, rather than masking the smell with candles and room sprays. Opting for less toxic household cleaning supplies. Read more

Related support groups: Cough, Cough and Nasal Congestion, Respiratory Tract Disease, Croup

4 Ways You Can Cut Smog in Your Town

Posted 4 May 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, May 4, 2016 – Those hazy days of summer may mean high smog levels for some northeastern U.S. states, but you can help reduce air pollution where you live, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency says. Smog is a combination of ground-level ozone and fine particle air pollution. "Air pollution is a significant public health issue in New England," said Curt Spalding, regional administrator of the EPA's New England office. "New Englanders need to pay close attention to air-quality alerts and limit strenuous outdoor activity on air-quality alert days. In addition, we can all take individual actions to reduce the air pollution that contributes to this public health risk," he said in an agency news release. As part of Air Quality Awareness Week May 2-6, the EPA outlined four steps you can take to reduce air pollution, including: Use public transit or walk whenever possible. Set ... Read more

Related support groups: Cough, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Sinusitis, Bronchitis, Tonsillitis/Pharyngitis, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Maintenance, Cough and Nasal Congestion, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Acute, Bronchiectasis, Sinus Symptoms, Respiratory Tract Disease, Croup

Smog May Boost Risk for Several Cancers

Posted 29 Apr 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, April 29, 2016 – Long-term exposure to fine particles of air pollution – from cars, trucks, power plants and manufacturing facilities – is tied to an increased risk of dying from several kinds of cancer, a new study suggests. "Air pollution remains a clear, modifiable public health concern," said researcher G. Neil Thomas, a reader in epidemiology at the University of Birmingham in England. "Put simply, the more of these particulates there are in the air, the greater the risk of getting these cancers," Thomas said, although the study did not prove the particles actually cause cancer. The study, involving more than 66,000 older residents of Hong Kong, found an increased risk of dying from cancer for even small increases in exposure to these tiny particles of air pollution, which are measured in micrograms per cubic meter (mcg/m3). For example, the overall risk of dying from ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Cough, Smoking, Breast Cancer, Bronchitis, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Maintenance, Upper Respiratory Tract Infection, Colorectal Cancer, Lung Cancer, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Acute, Bronchiectasis, Croup, Toxic Reactions Incl Drug and Substance Abuse

Climate Change May Mean More Smoggy Days to Come: Study

Posted 21 Apr 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, April 21, 2016 – Climate change could cause many major American cities to experience more days with heavy ozone pollution in the coming decades, a new study predicts. If emission rates continue unchecked, regions within the United States could experience between three and nine additional days of unhealthy ozone levels between May and September by 2050, the study authors said. The researchers are concerned that climate change could undo the progress made under the Clean Air Act to rid U.S. skies of air pollution. "We found, in fact, that climate change could be a monkey wrench in our plans," said study co-author Loretta Mickley. She is a senior research fellow at Harvard's School of Engineering and Applied Sciences in Cambridge, Mass. "The number of bad ozone days per summer could double – could increase by as much as a week – by the 2050s," she said. California, the ... Read more

Related support groups: Cough, Asthma, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Sinusitis, Bronchitis, Pneumonia, Cold Symptoms, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Maintenance, Upper Respiratory Tract Infection, Asthma - Acute, Cough and Nasal Congestion, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Acute, Bronchiectasis, Respiratory Tract Disease, Croup, Allergic Asthma, Bronchospastic Disease

Doctors Issue Call to Combat Climate Change

Posted 18 Apr 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, April 18, 2016 – Climate change is already harming people's health by promoting illnesses linked to warmer temperatures and changing weather patterns, a leading group of U.S. doctors says in a new position paper. As a result, the American College of Physicians (ACP) is calling for "aggressive, concerted" action to fight climate change by curbing man-made greenhouse gas emissions. Respiratory illnesses, heat stroke and infectious diseases like Zika virus, dengue fever and cholera are flourishing as global temperatures rise, said Dr. Wayne Riley, president of the college. "Our climate is already changing and people are already being harmed. If we don't begin to address climate change, we're going to see more and more manifestations of these health problems," Riley said. "There is clear, compelling scientific consensus that climate change is real," he added. "There is no dispute." ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Anxiety and Stress, Migraine, Major Depressive Disorder, Allergies, Asthma, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Sinusitis, Migraine Prevention, Bronchitis, Pneumonia, Asthma - Maintenance, Cold Symptoms, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Maintenance, Upper Respiratory Tract Infection, Dyspnea, Migraine Prophylaxis, Psychiatric Disorders, Dysthymia

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