Skip to Content

Join the 'Crohn's Disease - Acute' group to help and get support from people like you.

Crohn's Disease - Acute News

Drug Stelara May Ease Crohn's Disease

Posted 20 days ago by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Nov. 17, 2016 – People with moderate to severe Crohn's disease who haven't responded to other treatments may benefit from the drug ustekinumab (Stelara), a new study suggests. Stelara is a monoclonal antibody that blocks the action of the inflammatory agents interleukin-12 and interleukin-23. The drug had been approved for the treatment of psoriasis and is now approved for treating Crohn's disease as well. Crohn's disease is a chronic inflammatory condition of the gastrointestinal tract. Crohn's usually affects the end of the small bowel and the beginning of the colon. But it may affect any part of the gastrointestinal tract, from the mouth to the anus, according to the Crohn's and Colitis Foundation of America (CCFA). Crohn's can cause diarrhea, rectal bleeding, an urgent need to move the bowels, stomach cramps, pain and constipation, the CCFA says. "Stelara is effective for ... Read more

Related support groups: Humira, Crohn's Disease, Remicade, Crohn's Disease - Maintenance, Cimzia, Stelara, Crohn's Disease - Acute, Ustekinumab

Study Identifies Genetic Subtypes of Crohn's Disease

Posted 14 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Oct. 14, 2016 – Crohn's disease appears to have at least two distinct genetic subtypes, which could explain why the condition is so hard to treat, a new study suggests. "The one-treatment-fits-all approach doesn't seem to be working for Crohn's patients," said study co-senior author Dr. Shehzad Sheikh. He's an assistant professor in the departments of medicine and genetics at the University of North Carolina School of Medicine. "It's plausible that this is because only a subset of patients has the type of disease that responds to standard therapy, whereas, for the rest of the patients, we're really not hitting the right targets," Sheikh said in a university news release. Crohn's is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the intestinal tract. The most common symptoms are diarrhea, stomach cramps and weight loss. The course and severity of the disease vary widely from patient to ... Read more

Related support groups: Humira, Crohn's Disease, Asacol, Crohn's Disease - Maintenance, Sulfasalazine, Pentasa, Inflammatory Bowel Disease, Lialda, Stelara, Crohn's Disease - Acute, Apriso, Canasa, Mesalamine, Azulfidine, Diagnosis and Investigation, Asacol HD, Delzicol, Sulfazine, Rowasa, Mesasal Enteric Coated

Amjevita OK'd to Treat Inflammatory Diseases

Posted 27 Sep 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Sept. 26, 2016 – Amjevita (adalimumab-atto) – a biosimilar drug similar to the popular anti-inflammatory drug Humira – has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Amjevita has been approved for moderate-to-severe rheumatoid arthritis; psoriatic arthritis; ankylosing spondylitis (an arthritis that affects the spine); Crohn's disease; ulcerative colitis; plaque psoriasis and juvenile idiopathic arthritis, the FDA said in a news release. Biological drugs are generally derived from a living organism and can come from many sources, including humans, animals, microorganisms or yeast, the FDA said. A biosimilar drug is a biological product that's sanctioned after its maker proves it is "highly similar" to an already-approved biologic drug. The manufacturer of the biosimilar drug must prove that the product has "no clinically meaningful differences" in safety, purity ... Read more

Related support groups: Rheumatoid Arthritis, Humira, Crohn's Disease, Psoriatic Arthritis, Ulcerative Colitis, Ankylosing Spondylitis, Crohn's Disease - Maintenance, Ulcerative Colitis - Active, Plaque Psoriasis, Crohn's Disease - Acute, Ulcerative Colitis - Maintenance, Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis, Adalimumab, Amjevita

Smoking Linked to Higher Relapse Risk After Surgery for Crohn's

Posted 2 Sep 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Sept. 1, 2016 – Smoking increases the risk that Crohn's disease patients will have relapses after bowel surgery, new research suggests. The study included 240 Crohn's disease patients in the United Kingdom who were followed for three years after bowel surgery. Crohn's disease occurs when the immune system attacks the lining of the gut and bowel, and causes severe inflammation, the study authors noted. This can result in diarrhea, abdominal pain, nausea and reduced appetite. Patients are usually initially treated with drugs to suppress their immune system. But the study authors said that more than half of Crohn's patients eventually have surgery to remove the affected section of their bowel. However, surgery does not cure Crohn's, and relapses are common. According to the researchers from the University of Edinburgh in Scotland, smokers were much more likely than nonsmokers to ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Smoking, Crohn's Disease, Smoking Cessation, Crohn's Disease - Maintenance, Crohn's Disease - Acute

Inflectra Approved as 'Biosimilar' to Remicade

Posted 7 Apr 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, April 6, 2016 – The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved its second-ever "biosimilar" drug, Inflectra, for adults with Crohn's disease, rheumatoid arthritis or chronic plaque psoriasis, among other prescribed uses. In a media release, the agency said Inflectra was biosimilar to Janssen Biotech's Remicade (infliximab), first licensed in 1998. A biosimilar drug is sanctioned based on its maker's ability to show that it is "highly similar" to an already-approved biological drug that is generally derived from a living organism, such as a person, animal, microorganism or yeast, the FDA said. The maker of a biosimilar drug also must prove that the product has no "clinically meaningful difference" in safety and effectiveness from the original drug, and that the newer product has only "minor differences in clinically inactive components" from the original. Inflectra's most ... Read more

Related support groups: Rheumatoid Arthritis, Psoriasis, Crohn's Disease, Remicade, Psoriatic Arthritis, Ulcerative Colitis, Ankylosing Spondylitis, Crohn's Disease - Maintenance, Ulcerative Colitis - Active, Plaque Psoriasis, Crohn's Disease - Acute, Ulcerative Colitis - Maintenance, Infliximab, Inflectra

Health Tip: Get Enough Nutrients

Posted 14 Jan 2016 by Drugs.com

-- A nutritious diet is especially important for people with irritable bowel disease (IBD), since they may be at increased risk of malnutrition. The Crohn's and Colitis Foundation of America says possible benefits of a nutritious diet include: Fewer symptoms of IBD. Reduced risk of iron or calcium deficiency. Improved bone health. Healthier body weight. Better regulation of hormone levels in girls and women. Read more

Related support groups: Irritable Bowel Syndrome, Crohn's Disease, Crohn's Disease - Maintenance, Crohn's Disease - Acute

Stem Cell Transplants May Not Help Tough-to-Treat Crohn's, Study Says

Posted 15 Dec 2015 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Dec. 15, 2015 – Stem cell transplants seem no better than conventional therapy for Crohn's disease that hasn't responded to other treatments, a new study finds. The European study also found that for patients who cannot undergo surgery for the condition, stem cell transplants resulted in serious side effects, including infections. "In this group of the most resistant cases of Crohn's disease, stem cell transplant was an effective treatment, but it is not a miracle cure that could be applied to anyone with Crohn's disease, because it only seems to work in a minority of patients and the treatment is challenging and hazardous," said lead researcher Christopher Hawkey. He is a professor of gastroenterology at Queen's Medical Centre in Nottingham, England. For the study, Hawkey and colleagues randomly assigned 45 patients with Crohn's disease to transplants with their own stem ... Read more

Related support groups: Crohn's Disease, Asacol, Crohn's Disease - Maintenance, Sulfasalazine, Pentasa, Lialda, Crohn's Disease - Acute, Apriso, Canasa, Mesalamine, Azulfidine, Delzicol, Diagnosis and Investigation, Asacol HD, Sulfazine, Rowasa, Salofalk, FIV-ASA, Mesasal Enteric Coated, Azulfidine EN-tabs

Ultrasound Might Speed Up Digestive Drug Delivery: Animal Study

Posted 21 Oct 2015 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 21, 2015 – Ultrasound waves could be used to rapidly deliver drugs to the digestive system, new animal research suggests. This new approach to drug delivery might potentially benefit people with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), such as Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. However, this new method of drug delivery hasn't yet been tested in humans. "With additional research, our technology could prove invaluable in both clinical and research settings, enabling improved therapies and expansion of research techniques applied to the [gastrointestinal] tract," said co-senior study author Daniel Blankschtein, a professor of chemical engineering at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in Cambridge. "[Our study] demonstrates for the first time the active administration of drugs, including biologics, through the GI tract," he said in an MIT news release. The ... Read more

Related support groups: Crohn's Disease, Colitis, Ulcerative Colitis, Crohn's Disease - Maintenance, Ulcerative Colitis - Active, Inflammatory Bowel Disease, Crohn's Disease - Acute, Ulcerative Colitis - Maintenance, Diagnosis and Investigation

Crohn's Disease Treatments for Kids May Not Get Gut Back to Normal

Posted 14 Oct 2015 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 14, 2015 – Current therapies for children with Crohn's disease don't fully restore healthy bacteria and fungi populations in their digestive systems, a new study shows. These findings suggest that treatments don't have to bring bacteria and other microbe levels back to normal levels in the gut to be useful. This knowledge could lead to new approaches for diagnosing and treating inflammatory bowel disease, according to the Oct. 14 study in the journal Cell Host & Microbe. "We show that microbes in the gut respond to treatment of inflammatory bowel disease in a much more complex way than has been previously appreciated," co-principal investigator Gary Wu, from the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, said in a journal news release. "The results of our study provide information that could be used to track or predict disease, as well as new diet-based therapeutic ... Read more

Related support groups: Prednisone, Methylprednisolone, Crohn's Disease, Prednisolone, Hydrocortisone, Medrol, Cortisone, Dexamethasone, Triamcinolone, Asacol, Crohn's Disease - Maintenance, Betamethasone, Sulfasalazine, Pentasa, Budesonide, Lialda, Decadron, Crohn's Disease - Acute, Entocort, Solu-Medrol

Crohn's Disease, Colitis Tied to Anxiety in Study

Posted 4 Aug 2015 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Aug. 4, 2015 – People with inflammatory bowel disease, such as Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis, have an increased risk for an anxiety disorder, especially women, a new study suggests. Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a group of disorders that cause chronic inflammation of the digestive tract. "Patients with IBD face substantial chronic physical problems associated with the disease," lead author Esme Fuller-Thomson, a professor from the University of Toronto, said in a university news release. "The additional burden of anxiety disorders makes life much more challenging so this 'double jeopardy' must be addressed." The study authors looked at 269 Canadian adults who had been diagnosed with an inflammatory bowel disease. The researchers found that these patients were two times more likely to have had generalized anxiety disorder at some point in their lives than adults ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Panic Disorder, Anxiety and Stress, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Social Anxiety Disorder, Crohn's Disease, Colitis, Ulcerative Colitis, Crohn's Disease - Maintenance, Ulcerative Colitis - Active, Performance Anxiety, Crohn's Disease - Acute, Ulcerative Colitis - Maintenance, Lymphocytic Colitis, Allergic Colitis

Stem Cells, Fecal Transplants Show Promise for Crohn's Disease

Posted 10 Apr 2015 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, April 10, 2015 – Two experimental therapies might help manage the inflammatory bowel disorder Crohn's disease, if this early research pans out. In one study, researchers found that a fecal transplant – stool samples taken from a healthy donor – seemed to send Crohn's symptoms into remission in seven of nine children treated. In another, a separate research team showed that stem cells can have lasting benefits for a serious Crohn's complication called fistula. According to the Crohn's & Colitis Foundation, up to 700,000 Americans have Crohn's – a chronic inflammatory disease that causes abdominal cramps, diarrhea, constipation and rectal bleeding. It arises when the immune system mistakenly attacks the lining of the digestive tract. A number of drugs are available to treat Crohn's, including drugs called biologics, which block certain immune-system proteins. But fecal ... Read more

Related support groups: Crohn's Disease, Crohn's Disease - Maintenance, Crohn's Disease - Acute

New Drug for Crohn's Disease Shows Early Promise

Posted 18 Mar 2015 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, March 18, 2015 – An experimental drug may quickly quash symptoms of the digestive disorder Crohn's disease – at least for the short term, an early clinical trial finds. The study, of more than 150 adults with Crohn's, found that just two weeks of treatment sent many into remission – meaning they had few to no symptoms of the inflammatory bowel disease 28 days after the study began. Experts said the findings are encouraging. For one, the drug is a pill, whereas the current "biologic" drugs for Crohn's – such as Remicade and Humira – are given by injection or IV. And the drug worked quickly. "There was a pretty high remission rate in a short period of time. That's impressive," said Dr. Raymond Cross, a gastroenterologist at the University of Maryland Medical Center, who was not involved in the study. In theory, the new drug – dubbed mongersen – could be safer than ... Read more

Related support groups: Crohn's Disease, Crohn's Disease - Acute

Black Children May Fare Worse With Crohn's Disease

Posted 10 Mar 2015 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, March 10, 2015 – Race may play a role in outcomes for children and teens with Crohn's disease, with black patients faring worse than whites, a new study suggests. "We found racial inequalities exist among children and adolescents with Crohn's disease, likely due to a combination of genetic and environmental differences," Dr. Jennifer Dotson, a gastroenterologist at Nationwide Children's Hospital and principal investigator in the Center for Innovation and Pediatric Practice, said in a hospital news release. Researchers analyzed data from more than 4,000 white and black patients with moderate to severe Crohn's disease. They were all aged 21 or younger. All had been hospitalized due to the digestive system disease between 2004 and 2012. Black patients were 1.5 times more likely to be readmitted to the hospital and required readmission sooner than white patients, according to the ... Read more

Related support groups: Crohn's Disease, Crohn's Disease - Maintenance, Crohn's Disease - Acute

Scientists Grow, Implant Human Intestinal Tissue in Mice

Posted 20 Oct 2014 by Drugs.com

SUNDAY, Oct. 19, 2014 – New stem cell-based research could improve understanding of intestinal diseases and eventually lead to new treatments, a new study suggests. Scientists used stem cells to grow "organoids" of functioning human intestinal tissue in a lab dish. They then transplanted the organoids into mice, creating a new model for studying intestinal disorders, according to the researchers. "This provides a new way to study the many diseases and conditions that can cause intestinal failure, from genetic disorders appearing at birth to conditions that strike later in life, such as cancer and Crohn's disease," lead investigator Dr. Michael Helmrath, surgical director of the Intestinal Rehabilitation Program at the Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, said in a center news release. "These studies also advance the longer-term goal of growing tissues that can replace damaged ... Read more

Related support groups: Crohn's Disease, Crohn's Disease - Maintenance, Crohn's Disease - Acute

Entyvio Approved for Ulcerative Colitis and Crohn's Disease

Posted 20 May 2014 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, May 20, 2014 – Entyvio (vedolizumab) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat adults with moderate-to-severe forms of two gastrointestinal conditions – ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. The approval applies to people for whom standard therapies – such as corticosteroids or tumor necrosis factor-blocking medications – have failed. Ulcerative colitis, affecting about 620,000 Americans, causes inflammation and ulcers in the large intestine. This can lead to abdominal discomfort, bleeding and diarrhea, the FDA said in a news release. Crohn's causes inflammation and irritation of any part of the gastrointestinal tract. More than 500,000 Americans have been diagnosed with Crohn's, the FDA said. The most common side effects of Entyvio include headache, joint pain, nausea and fever. More serious adverse reactions observed during clinical testing ... Read more

Related support groups: Crohn's Disease, Ulcerative Colitis, Crohn's Disease - Maintenance, Ulcerative Colitis - Active, Crohn's Disease - Acute, Ulcerative Colitis - Maintenance

Page 1 2 Next

Ask a Question

Further Information

Related Condition Support Groups

Crohn's Disease

Related Drug Support Groups

metronidazole, Humira, Flagyl, Remicade, sulfasalazine, Imuran, budesonide, Cimzia, azathioprine, view more... Metro, mercaptopurine, Entocort EC, Flagyl IV, infliximab, adalimumab, Azasan, Purinethol, certolizumab, Amjevita, Metryl, Metro IV, Flagyl 375, Protostat