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Related terms: Enteritis, Noninfectious

Ultrasound Might Speed Up Digestive Drug Delivery: Animal Study

Posted 21 Oct 2015 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 21, 2015 – Ultrasound waves could be used to rapidly deliver drugs to the digestive system, new animal research suggests. This new approach to drug delivery might potentially benefit people with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), such as Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. However, this new method of drug delivery hasn't yet been tested in humans. "With additional research, our technology could prove invaluable in both clinical and research settings, enabling improved therapies and expansion of research techniques applied to the [gastrointestinal] tract," said co-senior study author Daniel Blankschtein, a professor of chemical engineering at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in Cambridge. "[Our study] demonstrates for the first time the active administration of drugs, including biologics, through the GI tract," he said in an MIT news release. The ... Read more

Related support groups: Crohn's Disease, Colitis, Ulcerative Colitis, Crohn's Disease - Maintenance, Ulcerative Colitis - Active, Inflammatory Bowel Disease, Crohn's Disease - Acute, Ulcerative Colitis - Maintenance, Diagnosis and Investigation

Review Finds Fecal Transplants Work Well But Need Tight Regulation

Posted 21 Oct 2015 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 21, 2015 – The growing use of fecal transplants needs to be carefully controlled, experts say. The therapy is increasingly being used to treat people with life-threatening intestinal infections, such as those caused by the bacterium Clostridium difficile. The procedure involves transferring fecal matter from a healthy donor into the intestine of a patient so that healthy bacteria can re-colonize the bowel. Researchers analyzed available evidence and found that fecal transplants were 85 percent successful in treating patients, compared with 20 percent for standard antibiotic treatment. A recent clinical trial was halted early because fecal transplantation proved so effective, with a 90 percent success rate compared to 26 percent for powerful antibiotics, the researchers noted. After more than 7,000 fecal transplants, few harmful effects have been reported and the ... Read more

Related support groups: Diabetes, Type 2, Obesity, Irritable Bowel Syndrome, Colitis, Clostridial Infection, Pseudomembranous Colitis

Health Tip: Should I Talk to my Doctor About Gas?

Posted 10 Aug 2015 by Drugs.com

-- While everyone has intestinal gas, some people have severe bloating that causes discomfort and other problems. The Mayo Clinic mentions these warning signs that you may need to see a doctor: Intestinal gas that is persistent and severe. Intestinal gas that occurs with vomiting. Long-term diarrhea, bloody stool or constipation. Weight loss for no apparent reason. Heartburn. Read more

Related support groups: GERD, Diarrhea, Constipation, Gas, Weight Loss, Abdominal Distension, Colitis, Indigestion, Constipation - Chronic, Hemorrhoids, Gastrointestinal Disorders, Inflammatory Bowel Disease, Duodenitis/Gastritis, Constipation - Acute, Diarrhea, Chronic, Anal Fissure and Fistula, Diarrhea, Acute, Infectious Diarrhea, Functional Gastric Disorder, Acute Abdomen

Crohn's Disease, Colitis Tied to Anxiety in Study

Posted 4 Aug 2015 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Aug. 4, 2015 – People with inflammatory bowel disease, such as Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis, have an increased risk for an anxiety disorder, especially women, a new study suggests. Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a group of disorders that cause chronic inflammation of the digestive tract. "Patients with IBD face substantial chronic physical problems associated with the disease," lead author Esme Fuller-Thomson, a professor from the University of Toronto, said in a university news release. "The additional burden of anxiety disorders makes life much more challenging so this 'double jeopardy' must be addressed." The study authors looked at 269 Canadian adults who had been diagnosed with an inflammatory bowel disease. The researchers found that these patients were two times more likely to have had generalized anxiety disorder at some point in their lives than adults ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Panic Disorder, Anxiety and Stress, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Social Anxiety Disorder, Crohn's Disease, Colitis, Ulcerative Colitis, Crohn's Disease - Maintenance, Ulcerative Colitis - Active, Crohn's Disease - Acute, Performance Anxiety, Ulcerative Colitis - Maintenance, Lymphocytic Colitis, Allergic Colitis

Fecal Transplant Helps Fight Off Dangerous Gut Infection: Review

Posted 4 May 2015 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, May 4, 2015 – Though saddled with an undeniable "yuck factor," fecal transplantation appears to be a safe and effective way to combat a serious intestinal infection, according to a new review. Fecal transplantation, also known as fecal bacteriotherapy, is a procedure that involves the removal of stool from a healthy donor and infusion of that stool – and all the healthy bacteria it contains – into the microbial environment of the sick patient. Specifically, the review found that for recurrent infections caused by the bacteria Clostridium difficile (C. difficile), the intervention is successful 85 percent of the time. Fecal transplants also helped 55 percent of patients for whom standard drug treatments didn't work. C. difficile can be picked up in hospitals and doctors' offices, and in 2011 the bacteria was to blame for 500,000 infections and 29,000 deaths, according to the ... Read more

Related support groups: Diarrhea, Colitis, Gastrointestinal Disorders, Bowel Preparation, Diarrhea, Chronic, Clostridial Infection, Erosive Gastritis

Viruses May Play Role in Crohn's Disease, Colitis: Study

Posted 23 Jan 2015 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Jan. 23, 2015 – Viruses may play a role in inflammatory bowel diseases, including the two most common types, Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, a new study reveals. Previous research has linked these bowel diseases with a lower variety of bacteria in the gut, according to the researchers. In this new study, people with inflammatory bowel disease had a greater variety of viruses in their digestive systems compared to healthy people, the investigators found. The findings suggest that viruses, as well as bacteria, are a factor in inflammatory bowel disease, according to the study published online Jan. 22 in the journal Cell. The findings are the "tip of the iceberg," said study senior author Dr. Herbert Virgin IV, a professor of pathology and head of the department of pathology and immunology at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. Much more research is ... Read more

Related support groups: Crohn's Disease, Colitis, Ulcerative Colitis

Crohn's and Colitis May Be Tied to Risk of Heart Attack, Stroke

Posted 14 Oct 2013 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Oct. 14 – People with inflammatory bowel disease may be at increased risk for heart attack and stroke, a new study suggests. Researchers analyzed data from more than 150,000 inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients who took part in nine studies. They found that these patients had a 10 percent to 25 percent increased risk of stroke and heart attack, and that this increased risk was more prevalent among women. Doctors need to be aware of this link and should focus on controlling other stroke and heart attack risk factors, such as smoking, high blood pressure and diabetes, study author Siddharth Singh, of the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., said in a news release from the clinic. The study was scheduled for presentation Monday at the annual meeting of the American College of Gastroenterology, in San Diego. Research presented at medical meetings should be viewed as preliminary ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Attack, Crohn's Disease, Colitis, Myocardial Infarction

Flu Vaccine Safe for Kids With Crohn's, Colitis: Study

Posted 6 May 2013 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, May 6 – Yearly flu vaccinations are safe for children with inflammatory bowel disease, but too few of these youngsters get a flu shot because their parents worry about possible side effects, researchers report. Not only does vaccination help protect against the flu, it may even reduce inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) symptoms, according to the study, which was published May 6 in the journal Pediatrics. Children with inflammatory bowel disease, which includes Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, often experience chronic abdominal pain, diarrhea, joint pain and other symptoms. The researchers looked at all children under age 19 diagnosed with IBD in Ontario, Canada, between 1999 and 2009. They found that about 25 percent of the IBD patients received a flu shot from a doctor or nurse practitioner and that these youngsters had no increase in IBD-related health issues after being ... Read more

Related support groups: Crohn's Disease, Colitis, FluLaval, Afluria, Fluzone, Flucelvax, Influenza Virus Vaccine, Inactivated, Fluzone Preservative-Free, Fluarix, Fluzone WV, Fluogen, Fluvirin, Agriflu, Fluzone PFS, Fluzone SV, Flushield

Study Finds No Tie Between Acne Drug Accutane and Crohn's, Colitis

Posted 20 Feb 2013 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 20 – A new study counters the notion that the prescription acne drug Accutane raises the risk of Crohn's disease or colitis in women. The study of more than 45,000 women found no such link between Accutane (isotretinoin) use and these illnesses, which are collectively known as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). One expert not connected to the study called it a "welcome review." "There has been a lot of speculation and even litigation that Accutane causes inflammatory bowel disease," said Dr. Michele Green, a dermatologist at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City. "Dermatologists have been discouraged from using Accutane and the makers of Accutane have discontinued their production due to countless lawsuits," she noted, but "this study once again highlights the safety of Accutane." Ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease are the most common forms of IBD, a group of ... Read more

Related support groups: Acne, Accutane, Crohn's Disease, Colitis, Isotretinoin, Claravis, Inflammatory Bowel Disease, Amnesteem, Sotret, Absorica, Myorisan

Gene Study Yields New Clues to Crohn's Disease, Colitis

Posted 31 Oct 2012 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 31 – Scientists say research into the genetics of inflammatory bowel disease – which includes Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis – is revealing new insights into the origin of this set of illnesses. The researchers said they have linked genetic variations in 163 regions of the human genome with a heightened risk of developing inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Of those regions, 71 are newly discovered. IBD comprises a group of chronic, autoimmune digestive disorders that affect 2.5 million people worldwide. Symptoms include abdominal pain and diarrhea and patients typically require lifelong treatment with drug therapy. Many also require surgery to repair tissue damage caused by the disease. In this study, researchers analyzed data from about 34,000 people who took part in 15 previous studies of either Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis. They also examined data ... Read more

Related support groups: Crohn's Disease, Colitis, Inflammatory Bowel Disease

Antibiotics in Childhood May Increase Bowel Disease Risk: Study

Posted 24 Sep 2012 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Sept. 24 – Use of certain antibiotics may put children at higher risk for developing bowel diseases, new research has found. The earlier children take antibiotics and the more they take, the higher the risk of later developing the inflammatory bowel diseases known as Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, the researchers found. "There appears to be a 'dose response' effect," said Dr. Matt Kronman, assistant professor of pediatric infectious diseases at the University of Washington School of Medicine in Seattle. "The more antibiotics children took, the more their risk increased." Earlier studies had suggested a link between bowel disease and antibiotics use, but most of those studies had limitations. The new study, published online Sept. 24 in the journal Pediatrics, looked at data on more than 1 million children 17 years old or younger in nearly 500 health practices ... Read more

Related support groups: Amoxicillin, Metronidazole, Penicillin, Crohn's Disease, Flagyl, Colitis, Ulcerative Colitis, Tetracycline, Inflammatory Bowel Disease, Amoxil, Penicillin VK, Metro, Flagyl IV, Flagyl IV RTU, Amoxil Pediatric Drops, Flagyl ER, Trimox, Bicillin LA, Biomox, Moxatag

Mouse Study Suggests Certain Fats Could Trigger Crohn's, Colitis

Posted 13 Jun 2012 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, June 13 – Certain types of saturated fats common in today's Western diet may change gut bacteria and trigger inflammatory bowel disease in people genetically predisposed to the disorder, according to a new study that looked at this relationship in mice. Inflammatory bowel disease includes ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. The University of Chicago researchers said their findings help explain why once rare immune-system-related disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease have become more common in the United States and other Westernized nations in the last half-century. The researchers said their study may shed some light on why many people who are genetically prone to the condition still don't develop it and how certain environmental factors can cause inflammation in those at risk. Scientists note, however, that research with animals often fails to provide similar ... Read more

Related support groups: Crohn's Disease, Colitis, Ulcerative Colitis, Crohn's Disease - Maintenance, Ulcerative Colitis - Active, Crohn's Disease - Acute, Ulcerative Colitis - Maintenance

Travel to High Altitudes Tied to Crohn's, Colitis Flare-Ups

Posted 25 May 2012 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, May 25 – People with inflammatory bowel disease, which includes Crohn's disease and colitis, may be at increased risk for flare-ups when they fly or travel to high altitudes for skiing or mountain climbing, a new study suggests. This complications affected patients with either Crohn's disease (which typically involves the small intestine) or ulcerative colitis (which typically involves the large intestine and rectum), but the risk appears to be higher in those with Crohn's disease, the researchers found. The study included 103 patients who were seen at inflammatory bowel disease clinics in Switzerland. The 52 patients with flares and the 51 patients who were in remission were asked about their activities during the previous month. Overall, patients with flares had made many more frequent flights or trips to areas above 6,500 feet. The study was to be presented Monday at the ... Read more

Related support groups: Crohn's Disease, Colitis, Ulcerative Colitis, Inflammatory Bowel Disease

Kids With Crohn's Disease, Colitis Often Struggle at School: Study

Posted 17 Feb 2012 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Feb. 17 – Children with inflammatory bowel disease may have difficulty in school due to frequent absences that are largely the result of mental struggles such as depression rather than the disease itself, a new study finds. Researchers from Nationwide Children's Hospital in Columbus, Ohio, had students aged 11 to 17 years with and without inflammatory bowel disease – which generally takes the form of Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis – answer questionnaires about their mental health, school functioning and quality of life. Schools provided report cards and school absence information. Children with the condition missed more days of school than healthy kids, and those who missed lots of school had lower grade point averages, according to the study. Kids with inflammatory bowel disease were also at risk of "internalizing" problems, such as depression, according to the study. ... Read more

Related support groups: Crohn's Disease, Colitis

Chronic Bowel Disease Drugs Linked to Skin Cancer Risk

Posted 23 Nov 2011 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Nov. 22 – Some patients with inflammatory bowel disease may be at increased risk for skin cancer due to their use of immunosuppressant drugs to treat the intestinal disorder, according to the results of two new studies. The studies, published in the November issue of the journal Gastroenterology, noted that immunosuppressants are commonly used to treat patients with inflammatory bowel disease, or IBD. Currently, there are no specific recommendations for skin cancer screening in IBD patients. In one study, French researchers led by Dr. Laurent Peyrin-Biroulet, of University Hospital of Nancy, found that both past and present use of a widely used class of immunosuppressants called thiopurines significantly increased the risk of non-melanoma skin cancer in irritable bowel disease patients. "The increased risk of skin cancer that we found in our study was observed in all patients, ... Read more

Related support groups: Crohn's Disease, Colitis, Ulcerative Colitis, Crohn's Disease - Maintenance, Basal Cell Carcinoma, Ulcerative Colitis - Active, Inflammatory Bowel Disease, Crohn's Disease - Acute, Ulcerative Colitis - Maintenance, Squamous Cell Carcinoma

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Ulcerative Colitis, Noninfectious Colitis, Pseudomembranous Colitis, Enterocolitis, Allergic Colitis, Gastrointestinal Disorders