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Coagulation Defects and Disorders News

FDA Approves Rebinyn (Coagulation Factor IX (Recombinant), GlycoPEGylated) for Patients with Hemophilia B

Posted 2 days 6 hours ago by Drugs.com

PLAINSBORO, N.J., May 31, 2017 /PRNewswire/ – Novo Nordisk today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved the Biologics License Application for Rebinyn (Coagulation Factor IX (Recombinant), GlycoPEGylated) for the treatment of adults and children with hemophilia B. Hemophilia B is a chronic and inherited bleeding disorder that affects approximately 5,000 people in the U.S.1 People with hemophilia B have deficient blood clotting factor IX activity that results in prolonged or spontaneous bleeding, especially into the muscles, joints or internal organs.2 Rebinyn® is the brand name for nonacog beta pegol, N9-GP. Rebinyn® is indicated for on-demand treatment and control of bleeding episodes, and the perioperative management of bleeding in adults and children with hemophilia B. Rebinyn® is not indicated for routine prophylaxis or for immune tolerance in ... Read more

Related support groups: Hemophilia B, Hemophilia, Coagulation Defects and Disorders, Coagulation Modifiers, Coagulation Factor Ix, Rebinyn

Common Food Nutrient Tied to Risky Blood Clotting

Posted 25 Apr 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, April 24, 2017 – A nutrient in meat and eggs may conspire with gut bacteria to make the blood more prone to clotting, a small study suggests. The nutrient is called choline. Researchers found that when they gave 18 healthy volunteers choline supplements, it boosted their production of a chemical called TMAO. That, in turn, increased their blood cells' tendency to clot. But the researchers also found that aspirin might reduce that risk. TMAO is short for trimethylamine N-oxide. It's produced when gut bacteria digest choline and certain other substances. Past studies have linked higher TMAO levels in the blood to heightened risks of blood clots, heart attack and stroke, said Dr. Stanley Hazen, the senior researcher on the new study. These findings, he said, give the first direct evidence that choline revs up TMAO production in the human gut, which then makes platelets (a type of ... Read more

Related support groups: Aspirin, Ischemic Stroke, Heart Attack, Excedrin, Transient Ischemic Attack, Myocardial Infarction, Aggrenox, Alka-Seltzer, Fiorinal, Excedrin Migraine, Arthritis Pain, Ecotrin, Ischemic Stroke - Prophylaxis, Fiorinal with Codeine, Arthritis Pain Formula, Bayer Aspirin, Soma Compound, Norgesic, Excedrin Extra Strength, Norgesic Forte

Nerve 'Zap' Treatment May Speed Stroke Recovery

Posted 1 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, March 1, 2017 – An implanted device that provides electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve leading to the brain enhanced arm movement in a small group of stroke patients, researchers report. Evaluating 17 stroke patients with chronic arm weakness who also received intense physical therapy, scientists found that three-quarters improved with vagus nerve stimulation (VNS), while only one-quarter of those receiving "sham" nerve stimulation did. "Arm weakness affects three of every four of our stroke patients and persists to a disabling degree in at least 50 percent of them, so it's a hugely important problem in the long term," explained study author Dr. Jesse Dawson. He's director of the Scottish Stroke Research Network and a clinical researcher at University of Glasgow. "A unique aspect of this [device] is that patients can deliver the brain stimulation technique in their own ... Read more

Related support groups: Ischemic Stroke, Transient Ischemic Attack, Ischemic Stroke - Prophylaxis, Coagulation Defects and Disorders

Study Tracks Bleeding Risk From Common Blood Thinners

Posted 28 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Feb. 28, 2017 – Blood thinners can help prevent dangerous clots, but they also come with risks for excess bleeding. Now, new research shows that use of the medications does boost the odds of "subdural hematomas" – bleeds occurring within the skull and near the brain. And some blood thinners carry higher risk than others. The Danish research team stressed that the results don't mean patients who need blood thinners should avoid them altogether – just that their data adds to decisions around their use. "The present data add one more piece of evidence to the complex risk-benefit equation of [blood thinner] use," wrote a team led by Dr. David Gaist, of Odense University Hospital and the University of Southern Denmark. Despite the bleeding risk, "it is known that these drugs result in net benefits overall in patients with clear therapeutic indications," the study authors added. ... Read more

Related support groups: Bleeding Disorder, Aspirin, Warfarin, Coumadin, Plavix, Xarelto, Pradaxa, Eliquis, Clopidogrel, Excedrin, Aggrenox, Alka-Seltzer, Fiorinal, Excedrin Migraine, Arthritis Pain, Ecotrin, Fiorinal with Codeine, Arthritis Pain Formula, Bayer Aspirin, Soma Compound

'Ablation' Procedure Helps 3 out of 4 Patients With Irregular Heartbeat

Posted 25 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 25, 2017 – Just how successful is the procedure called catheter ablation at fixing irregular heartbeats that can be potentially fatal? Pretty successful, a new study found, but there are caveats. Burning or freezing specific areas of the heart can alleviate the common irregular heart beat called atrial fibrillation in 74 percent of patients. However, the procedure doesn't work for everyone and there are risks of complications, researchers report. Atrial fibrillation increases the risk of early death by two times in women and 1.5 times in men. It causes 20 to 30 percent of all strokes and can decrease quality of life due to palpitations, shortness of breath, tiredness, weakness and psychological distress, the study authors explained. About 2.7 million Americans suffer from atrial fibrillation, according to the American Heart Association. For those whose atrial ... Read more

Related support groups: Blood Disorders, Warfarin, Coumadin, Atrial Fibrillation, Arrhythmia, Pradaxa, Prevention of Thromboembolism in Atrial Fibrillation, Cardiac Arrhythmia, Jantoven, Dabigatran, Coagulation Defects and Disorders, Atrial Tachycardia, Argatroban, Refludan, Desirudin, Angiomax, Lepirudin, Iprivask, Anisindione, Miradon

Could a Therapy for Irregular Heartbeat Harm the Brain?

Posted 24 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Jan. 24, 2017 – Catheter ablation is a common treatment for a form of irregular heartbeat known as premature ventricular contractions. Now, a small new study suggests the approach may put some patients at risk for brain injury. The findings are preliminary, but are "relevant to a large number of patients undergoing this procedure," study senior author Dr. Gregory Marcus said in a news release from the University of California, San Francisco. The study suggests that the procedure may help encourage the formation of brain lesions. Marcus, who directs clinical research at UCSF's department of cardiology, said he hopes the research "will inspire many studies to understand the meaning of and how to mitigate these lesions." The study included 18 patients who underwent catheter ablation for premature ventricular contractions (PVCs) – a type of abnormal heartbeat originating in a ... Read more

Related support groups: Bleeding Disorder, Arrhythmia, Diagnosis and Investigation, Brain Anomalies incl Congenital, Coagulation Defects and Disorders, Premature Ventricular Depolarizations, Head Imaging

Blood Banks Face Seasonal Shortages, New Screening Rules

Posted 23 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Dec. 23, 2016 – There's typically a shortage of both blood and platelets during the holiday season. But, tighter testing for a rare complication of transfusions makes the need for platelets even more urgent, experts at UT Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas say. Platelets are a component of blood that are essential for clotting. The complication, called transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI), is the leading cause of death due to transfusions, the experts said. "One reason the supply of blood platelets has decreased is that we now have additional required testing of platelets after donation," said Dr. Thomas Froehlich, medical director at the Harold C. Simmons Comprehensive Cancer Center. Blood and platelet shortages are traditionally common during the holidays. The shortages put cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy, trauma victims and people with health issues that ... Read more

Related support groups: Blood Disorders, Bleeding Disorder, Anemia, Blood Transfusion, Folic Acid Deficiency, Coagulation Defects and Disorders, Bleeding Associated with Coagulation Defect, Anemia Associated with Chronic Disease, Blood Cell Transplantation

Taking a Holiday Trip? Protect Yourself From Blood Clots

Posted 16 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Dec. 16, 2016 – Many Americans will travel afar to celebrate the holidays, potentially putting themselves at risk for deadly blood clots. Sitting for long periods in a car or airplane can limit blood circulation and cause a condition called deep vein thrombosis (DVT). In DVT, blood clots form in the deep veins of the lower legs and thighs. A clot can travel through the bloodstream and lodge in the brain, lungs, heart and other areas, causing severe organ damage and even death. But deep vein thrombosis is easy to prevent, according to Dr. Alan Lumsden, chief of cardiovascular surgery at Houston Methodist DeBakey Heart & Vascular Center. "If you plan to travel overseas or cross-country, make sure you get up and walk around at least every two hours, and try not to sleep more than four hours at a time. Drink plenty of water or juices, wear loose-fitting clothing, eat light meals ... Read more

Related support groups: Blood Disorders, Bleeding Disorder, Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT), Pulmonary Embolism, Deep Vein Thrombosis, Deep Vein Thrombosis - First Event, Deep Vein Thrombosis - Recurrent Event, Deep Vein Thrombosis - Prophylaxis, Coagulation Defects and Disorders

Drones a Safe Way to Transport Blood: Study

Posted 9 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Dec. 9, 2016 – Blood products don't seem to suffer damage when transported by drones, researchers report. The findings lend support to advocates who say that drones could offer a safe, effective and fast way to deliver blood products to accident sites, natural disasters or remote locations. "My vision is that, in the future, when a first responder arrives to the scene of an accident, he or she can test the victim's blood type right on the spot and send for a drone to bring the correct blood product," study first author Dr. Timothy Amukele said in a Johns Hopkins University news release. He is an assistant professor of pathology at the university's School of Medicine in Baltimore. Amukele and his Hopkins colleagues placed large bags of blood products – the size used for transfusion – into a cooler loaded on a drone that was flown 8 to 12 miles at about 328 feet off the ground. ... Read more

Related support groups: Blood Disorders, Anemia, Blood Transfusion, Coagulation Defects and Disorders, Blood Cell Transplantation

Another Step Closer to Artificial Blood

Posted 4 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

SATURDAY, Dec. 3, 2016 – Artificial blood stored as a powder could one day revolutionize emergency medicine and provide trauma victims a better chance of survival. Researchers have created an artificial red blood cell that effectively picks up oxygen in the lungs and delivers it to tissues throughout the body. This artificial blood can be freeze-dried, making it easier for combat medics and paramedics to keep on hand for emergencies, said senior researcher Dr. Allan Doctor. He is a critical care specialist at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. "It's a dried powder that looks like paprika, basically," Doctor said. "It can be stored in an IV plastic bag that a medic would carry, either in their ambulance or in a backpack, for a year or more. When they need to use it, they spike the bag with sterile water, mix it, and it's ready to inject right then and there." The ... Read more

Related support groups: Blood Disorders, Bleeding Disorder, Anemia, Blood Transfusion, Diagnosis and Investigation, Coagulation Defects and Disorders, Blood Cell Transplantation

Pradaxa Blood Thinner May Beat Warfarin After Bleeding Episode: Study

Posted 2 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Dec. 1, 2016 – Use of a blood thinner is routine for many heart patients, but these drugs come with a risk of episodes of excess bleeding. What, if any, anticoagulant (blood thinner) should these patients take after such episodes arise? A new study suggests that the blood thinner Pradaxa (dabigatran) may be a better choice than the standby drug warfarin in these cases. The reason: Pradaxa is less likely than warfarin to cause recurrent bleeding in patients who recently suffered a bleeding stroke or other major bleeding event, the researchers found. "Our results should encourage clinicians to seriously consider resuming anticoagulation among patients who survived a major bleeding event, particularly if the source of bleeding was identified and addressed," said study senior author Dr. Samir Saba. He's associate chief of cardiology at the University of Pittsburgh Heart and ... Read more

Related support groups: Bleeding Disorder, Warfarin, Coumadin, Ischemic Stroke, Xarelto, Pradaxa, Eliquis, Lovenox, Transient Ischemic Attack, Heparin, Rivaroxaban, Ischemic Stroke - Prophylaxis, Apixaban, Fragmin, Enoxaparin, Clexane, Arixtra, Hep-Pak, Dalteparin, Jantoven

Testosterone Therapy May Be Linked to Serious Blood Clots

Posted 1 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 30, 2016 – Testosterone treatment can increase a man's risk of potentially fatal blood clots, a new study suggests. Researchers found that men taking the male hormone seem to have a 63 percent increased risk of a blood clot forming in a vein, a condition known as venous thromboembolism (VTE). These clots can cause a heart attack, stroke, organ damage or even death, according to the American Heart Association. "Risk peaks rapidly in the first six months of treatment and lasts for about nine months, and fades gradually thereafter," said lead researcher Dr. Carlos Martinez of the Institute for Epidemiology, Statistics and Informatics in Frankfurt, Germany. Millions of American men currently use testosterone pills, gels or injections, hoping that the male hormone will boost their sex drive, stamina and strength. It's been known for a while that the estrogen in birth control ... Read more

Related support groups: Bleeding Disorder, Testosterone, Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT), AndroGel, Testim, Deep Vein Thrombosis, Axiron, Androderm, Depo-Testosterone, Testopel, Fortesta, Sexual Deviations or Disorders, Hypoactive Sexual Desire Disorder, Testopel Pellets, Venous Thromboembolism, Testim 5 g/packet, Delatestryl, Coagulation Defects and Disorders, FIRST-Testosterone, Striant

These Medicines Often Send Americans to ERs

Posted 22 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Nov. 22, 2016 – An estimated one in 250 Americans lands in the hospital emergency department each year because of a medication-related reaction or problem, a new federal study finds. Among adults 65 and older, the rate is about one in 100, the study authors said. Remarkably, the medicines causing the most trouble haven't changed in a decade, the researchers noted. Blood thinners, diabetes medicines and antibiotics top the list. These drugs accounted for 47 percent of emergency department visits for adverse drug events in 2013 and 2014, according to the analysis. Among older adults, blood thinners, diabetes medicines and opioid painkillers are implicated in nearly 60 percent of emergency department visits for adverse drug events. "The same drugs are causing the most problems," said study co-author Dr. Daniel Budnitz. The study doesn't tease out what went wrong. The reasons ... Read more

Related support groups: Pain, Suboxone, Oxycodone, Diabetes, Type 2, Back Pain, Hydrocodone, Tramadol, Percocet, Methadone, OxyContin, Vicodin, Norco, Fentanyl, Morphine, Codeine, Lortab, Opana, Warfarin, Coumadin, Subutex

Drug Combo for Irregular Heartbeat Might Raise Bleeding Risk

Posted 21 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Nov. 21, 2016 – Because the irregular heartbeat known as atrial fibrillation can trigger stroke-inducing clots, many patients are prescribed a blood thinner. But a new Canadian study suggests that combining one blood thinner, Pradaxa, with certain statin medications could raise the odds for bleeding in these patients. "An increase in the risk of bleeding requiring hospital admission or emergency department visits was seen with lovastatin [Mevacor] and simvastatin [Zocor] compared with the other statins," said study author Tony Antoniou, a pharmacist at St. Michael's Hospital in Toronto. His team tracked outcomes for nearly 46,000 patients ages 65 and older. All had atrial fibrillation and took Pradaxa (dabigatran) to reduce their risk of stroke. Those who also took either lovastatin or simvastatin had a 40 percent higher risk of bleeding than those who took other statins, the ... Read more

Related support groups: Bleeding Disorder, Atrial Fibrillation, Lipitor, Simvastatin, Crestor, Atorvastatin, Pravastatin, Pradaxa, Zocor, Lovastatin, Prevention of Thromboembolism in Atrial Fibrillation, Vytorin, Rosuvastatin, Pravachol, Livalo, Red Yeast Rice, Caduet, Simcor, Lescol, Dabigatran

Health Tip: Control a Bleeding Wound

Posted 9 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

-- Rinsing a wound with cold water helps clean it, but it may not be enough to prevent infection. Bleeding is the body's natural way of cleansing a wound. Then again, too much bleeding isn't healthy either. Here's how to stop heavy bleeding, courtesy of the American Academy of Family Physicians: If available, use a sterile or clean piece of cloth, gauze or tissue. Hold the material over the wound, gently applying pressure. Have another piece of clean material on hand. If the bleeding soaks the first piece, apply another clean piece on top, but don't remove the first piece. Hold the clean material in place for another 20 minutes with firm pressure. Raise a bleeding leg or arm above the level of your heart. Read more

Related support groups: Bleeding Disorder, Scrapes, Coagulation Defects and Disorders, Wound Cleansing, Minor Cuts, Minor Skin Conditions, Wound Debridement

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von Willebrand's Disease, Factor IX Deficiency, Anticoagulation During Pregnancy, Bleeding Associated with Coagulation Defect, Factor VII Deficiency, Congenital Fibrinogen Deficiency, Hemophilia, Antithrombin III Deficiency, Factor XIII Deficiency, Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation, Factor X Deficiency, Coagulopathy of Renal Failure, Hypoprothrombinemia, Bleeding Disorder