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Coagulation Defects and Disorders News

Newer Blood Thinners May Not Bring Higher Bleeding Risk

Posted 2 days 18 hours ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 18, 2017 – New anti-clotting drugs – like Xarelto, Pradaxa and Eliquis – aren't linked with a higher risk of bleeding than the older drug warfarin, a new study finds. Many patients who suffer from blood clots in their legs – called venous thromboembolism (VTE) – or have the abnormal heart rhythm called atrial fibrillation take blood thinners to help prevent life-threatening clots that can travel to the heart, lung or brain. "Given the advantages associated with these new drugs not requiring frequent monitoring, our results suggest that they may be considered as a treatment option for patients with VTE who are candidates for receiving oral anticoagulant therapy," said lead researcher Min Jun. He is a senior research fellow at the University of New South Wales in Sydney, Australia. Jun cautioned, however, that the Canadian-Australian study was an observational one, so ... Read more

Related support groups: Bleeding Disorder, Atrial Fibrillation, Xarelto, Pradaxa, Eliquis, Pulmonary Embolism, Prevention of Thromboembolism in Atrial Fibrillation, Venous Thromboembolism, Coagulation Defects and Disorders

Is Blood Donated by Mothers Less Safe for Men?

Posted 4 days ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Oct. 17, 2017 – Men who receive blood donated by previously pregnant women may face an increased risk of death following the transfusion, a new study from the Netherlands suggests. Males transfused with blood from a woman with a history of pregnancy appear to be 13 percent overall more likely to die in coming years, compared with those who received blood from another man, said researchers from Sanquin, the Dutch national blood bank. The highest risk seemed to be in men 18 to 50 years old. They had a 50 percent increased risk of death after receiving blood from a previously pregnant female, said Sanquin spokesman Merlijn van Hasselt, who answered questions on behalf of the research team. "The risk remained increased for many years after transfusion. No such increase was observed for female recipients, or for male recipients over 50 years," van Hasselt said. Pregnancy might ... Read more

Related support groups: Blood Transfusion, von Willebrand's Disease, Hemophilia A, Hemophilia, Hemophilia B, Coagulation Defects and Disorders, Bleeding Associated with Coagulation Defect, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation, Blood Cell Transplantation

First Test to Detect Zika in Blood Donations Approved

Posted 14 days ago by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Oct. 6, 2017 – The cobas Zika test has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration – the first approved screening test to detect the Zika virus in blood donations. The test is not designed to diagnose any particular person's Zika infection, however, the FDA said. In August 2016, the agency recommended that all U.S. states and territories screen blood for Zika, according to an FDA media release. "Screening blood donations for the Zika virus is critical to preventing infected donations from entering the U.S. blood supply," said Dr. Peter Marks, director of the FDA's Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research. Some blood-collection centers had already been using the cobas test in order to comply with the 2016 edict. Data collected from this testing, in tandem with additional information provided by the test's manufacturer, were used to approve the diagnostic, the FDA ... Read more

Related support groups: Blood Transfusion, Insect Bites, von Willebrand's Disease, Hemophilia, Coagulation Defects and Disorders, Zika Virus Infection, Blood Cell Transplantation

FDA Approves Test to Screen Donated Blood for Zika

Posted 15 days ago by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Oct. 6, 2017 – The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved a new test – called the cobas Zika test – to screen donated blood for the Zika virus. "Today's action represents the first approval of a Zika virus detection test for use with screening the nation's blood supply," Dr. Peter Marks said Thursday in an agency news release. Marks is director of the FDA's Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research. "Screening blood donations for the Zika virus is critical to preventing infected donations from entering the U.S. blood supply. Today's approval is the result of a commitment by the manufacturer to work rapidly and collaboratively with the FDA and the blood collection industry to respond to a public health crisis, and ensure the safety of blood in the U.S. and its territories." Zika is spread mainly through mosquitoes carrying the virus. It can also be transmitted ... Read more

Related support groups: Blood Transfusion, Diagnosis and Investigation, Coagulation Defects and Disorders, Zika Virus Infection, Blood Cell Transplantation

Blood Thinners Can Come With Dangerous Side Effects

Posted 18 days ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Oct. 3, 2017 – Blood-thinning drugs can save your life by preventing a heart attack or stroke caused by artery-blocking blood clots. But these are powerful drugs, and a pair of new studies detail side effects people need to understand before taking them. The effectiveness of a class of blood thinners called nonvitamin K oral anticoagulants (NOACs) can be significantly altered through interaction with other drugs, the first study reveals. In some cases, these drug interactions increase a person's risk of life-threatening bleeding in locations such as the brain and gastrointestinal tract. In other cases, the NOACs' effectiveness is reduced, robbing patients of some protection against stroke and heart attack. "NOACs alone do not pose a significant risk of bleeding, but the concurrent use of NOACs with certain drugs that share the same metabolic pathways may cause increased risk ... Read more

Related support groups: Warfarin, Coumadin, Xarelto, Lipitor, Atorvastatin, Pradaxa, Eliquis, Erythromycin, Clarithromycin, Digoxin, Biaxin, Rivaroxaban, Prevpac, MY-E, Apixaban, Caduet, Lanoxin, Erythrocin, Ery-Tab, A/T/S

Older Blood Is OK to Use in Transfusions To Critically Ill

Posted 27 Sep 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 27, 2017 – Using older red blood cells to give transfusions to critically ill patients doesn't appear to affect their risk of dying, Australian researchers report. It was once believed that fresh red blood cells were best suited for transfusions. But this new study adds to the evidence that older blood is just as good, if not better, the study authors said. "Red blood cells for transfusion for critically ill patients are like a good red wine – a little older, a little better," said researcher Dr. Jamie Cooper. He is professor and director of the Australian and New Zealand Intensive Care Research Center at Monash University in Melbourne. Study co-author Alistair Nichol added that a lot of inadequate research had suggested that fresher blood would be better to use in critically ill patients. Nichol is an associate professor of epidemiology and preventive medicine in the ... Read more

Related support groups: Bleeding Disorder, Blood Transfusion, Coagulation Defects and Disorders, Bleeding Associated with Coagulation Defect, Blood Cell Transplantation

Genetic Testing May Help Make Blood Thinner Safer

Posted 26 Sep 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Sept. 26, 2017 – Genetic testing can improve the safety of the blood thinner warfarin, a new study reports. Warfarin (Coumadin, Jantoven) is often prescribed to prevent life-threatening blood clots in high-risk patients. However, a patient's genes can influence how warfarin is processed in the body. Too little warfarin will not prevent blood clots while too much can trigger internal bleeding, the researchers explained. Warfarin is "a widely used anticoagulant, but it causes more major adverse events than any other oral drug. Thousands of patients end up in the emergency department or hospital because of warfarin-induced bleeding. But we continue to prescribe it because it is highly effective, reversible and inexpensive," said study first author Dr. Brian Gage. He is a professor of medicine at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. The researchers said they ... Read more

Related support groups: Warfarin, Coumadin, Knee Joint Replacement, Hip Replacement, Diagnosis and Investigation, Jantoven, Coagulation Defects and Disorders

Drone Sets New Record for Transporting Blood Samples

Posted 20 Sep 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Sept. 19, 2017 – A new distance record for delivery of blood samples by a medical drone has been set. A Johns Hopkins University drone transported dozens of human blood samples across 161 miles of Arizona desert. Throughout the three-hour flight, proper temperature control was maintained and the samples were usable for laboratory testing after reaching their destination. "We expect that in many cases, drone transport will be the quickest, safest and most efficient option to deliver some biological samples to a laboratory from rural or urban settings," senior study author Dr. Timothy Amukele said in a university news release. Amukele is an assistant professor of pathology at Johns Hopkins. He noted that drones can operate where there are no roads and overcome obstacles to timely diagnosis and care. "Drones are likely to be the 21st century's best medical sample delivery ... Read more

Related support groups: Blood Disorders, Diagnosis and Investigation, Coagulation Defects and Disorders

Nurses Learn How to Get Patients to Say 'Yes' to Blood Thinners

Posted 17 Aug 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Aug. 17, 2017 – Online training for nurses increased hospital patients' use of medication that can prevent potentially deadly blood clots, a new study reveals. Nurses sometimes won't give the blood thinning drugs if patients don't want them. So researchers developed the training to teach nurses how to respond when patients say they don't want to take blood thinners. The study included more than 900 nurses at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore. After the online training, the number of patients who refused to take prescribed blood thinners dropped from 12.4 percent to 11.1 percent, the findings showed. "We teach in hopes of improving patient care, but there's actually very little evidence that online professional education can have a measurable impact. Our results show that it does," study senior author Dr. Elliott Haut said in a Johns Hopkins news release. Haut is vice chair ... Read more

Related support groups: Bleeding Disorder, Warfarin, Coumadin, Atrial Fibrillation, Xarelto, Pradaxa, Eliquis, Lovenox, Prevention of Thromboembolism in Atrial Fibrillation, Heparin, Rivaroxaban, Enoxaparin, Apixaban, Fragmin, Clexane, Arixtra, Hep-Pak, Dalteparin, Jantoven, Dabigatran

Imbruvica Approval Expanded to Include Graft Versus Host Disease

Posted 3 Aug 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 2, 2017 – The U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Wednesday expanded approval for the anti-cancer drug Imbruvica (ibrutinib) to include adults with chronic graft versus host disease (cGVHD). cGVHD is a deadly condition that affects up to 70 percent of people who receive a stem cell transplant to treat cancers of the blood or bone marrow, the FDA said in a news release. The condition occurs when the transplanted cells attack healthy cells in a patient's tissues. "This approval highlights how a known treatment for cancer is finding a new use in treating a serious and life-threatening condition that may occur in patients with blood cancer who receive a stem cell transplant," said Dr. Richard Pazdur, director of the FDA's Oncology Center of Excellence. Use of Imbruvica to treat cGVHD was studied in a clinical trial of 42 people whose symptoms lingered despite standard ... Read more

Related support groups: Bleeding Disorder, Prednisone, Methylprednisolone, Prednisolone, Medrol, Hydrocortisone, Dexamethasone, Cortisone, Triamcinolone, Betamethasone, Budesonide, Decadron, Blood Transfusion, Entocort, Solu-Medrol, Florinef, Entocort EC, Imbruvica, Fludrocortisone, Cortef

10 Factors to Predict Bleeding Risk in Stroke Survivors

Posted 3 Aug 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 2, 2017 – Stroke survivors at high risk for bleeding from drugs meant to prevent another stroke can be identified using a new scoring system, new research contends. Many patients who have an ischemic stroke – which occurs when a clot blocks blood flow to the brain – are given drugs to prevent another clot. But these anti-clotting medications increase the risk of bleeding problems that can cause disability or death. In the new report, researchers analyzed data from six large studies of people who survived a stroke or mini-stroke (transient ischemic attack). Just over 43,000 people were included in the analysis. Of those, 1,530 had a major bleeding event – defined as bleeding within the skull or that led to death, a hospital stay or disability. The risk of such an event was 1.9 percent in the first year and 4.6 percent over three years, the investigators found. To ... Read more

Related support groups: Bleeding Disorder, Ischemic Stroke, Ischemic Stroke - Prophylaxis, Coagulation Defects and Disorders, Bleeding Associated with Coagulation Defect

McCain's Recovery Time After Surgery Uncertain, Experts Say

Posted 17 Jul 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, July 17, 2017 – A pending pathology report will reveal the health risk posed by a blood clot that forced U.S. Sen. John McCain to undergo brain surgery last week, experts say. The future of the Affordable Care Act may rest on McCain's recovery and return to Congress. A Senate vote to repeal the ACA – often called Obamacare – was shelved after McCain, 80, underwent a minimally invasive craniotomy above his left eye Friday. Doctors drilled into his skull and removed a roughly 2-inch blood clot, according to a statement from his office. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell needs McCain's support if he is to dismantle the ACA, a longstanding Republican goal. Repeal of the Obama health care act will require approval from 50 of the Senate's 52 Republicans, and two have already pledged to oppose the bill. McConnell has said voting will start when McCain, who is serving his sixth ... Read more

Related support groups: Ischemic Stroke, Head Injury, Transient Ischemic Attack, Ischemic Stroke - Prophylaxis, Surgical Prophylaxis, Coagulation Defects and Disorders

Viagra Might Make for a Safer, More Effective Stent

Posted 11 Jul 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, July 10, 2017 – It's worked wonders for men battling erectile dysfunction, and now early research suggests that Viagra – when added to artery-opening stents – might cut a patient's odds for clots. Stents are tiny mesh tubes surgically inserted to prop up failing blood vessels. But as South Korean researchers explained, these devices can become less effective over time as the growth of tissue around the metal device narrows the artery again. But in their new study in rats, the researchers found that coating stents with Viagra (sildenafil) might help prevent this re-closure from happening. "If similar results are found in clinical trials, sildenafil could be an ideal drug for coating drug-eluting [emitting] stents or to give orally after stent implantation," study lead author Dr. Han-Mo Yang said in a news release from the American Heart Association. Yang is an associate ... Read more

Related support groups: Viagra, Sildenafil, Revatio, Coagulation Defects and Disorders, Cardiothoracic Surgery

FDA Approves New Drug, Endari, for Sickle Cell Disease

Posted 7 Jul 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, July 7, 2017 – The U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Friday approved the first new drug for sickle cell disease in nearly two decades. Endari (L-glutamine oral powder) helps reduce severe complications associated with the blood disorder, the agency said. Sickle cell disease is an inherited disorder in which the red blood cells are shaped like a sickle, which limits the flow of vital oxygen to organs and tissues. In turn, this triggers severe pain and organ damage. Approximately 100,000 Americans, mostly minorities, have sickle cell disease, according to the U.S. National Institutes of Health. "Endari is the first treatment approved for patients with sickle cell disease in almost 20 years," said Dr. Richard Pazdur, acting director of the Office of Hematology and Oncology Products at the FDA's Center for Drug Evaluation and Research. "Until now, only one other drug was ... Read more

Related support groups: Blood Disorders, Bleeding Disorder, Anemia, Anemia - Sickle Cell, Coagulation Defects and Disorders

Blood Shortage Prompts Call for Donations

Posted 6 Jul 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, July 6, 2017 – The American Red Cross needs your blood, and it needs it now. The group issued an emergency call for donations on Wednesday. Over the past two months, there have been about 61,000 fewer donations than what is needed, the organization said. "The decline in summer donations is causing a significant draw-down of our overall blood supply, and we urgently need people to give now to restock hospital shelves and help save lives," said Shaun Gilmore, president of Red Cross Biomedical Services. The July 4th holiday has been especially challenging: Nearly 700 fewer blood drives were held this week than during an average week. That's the equivalent of no blood drives nationwide for an entire day, the agency explained. "Every day, patients recovering from accidents or those receiving treatments for cancer or blood disorders rely on lifesaving blood products, regardless of ... Read more

Related support groups: Blood Disorders, Bleeding Disorder, Iron Deficiency Anemia, Blood Transfusion, Thalassemia, Coagulation Defects and Disorders, Blood Cell Transplantation

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von Willebrand's Disease, Factor IX Deficiency, Anticoagulation During Pregnancy, Bleeding Associated with Coagulation Defect, Factor VII Deficiency, Antithrombin III Deficiency, Hemophilia, Congenital Fibrinogen Deficiency, Factor XIII Deficiency, Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation, Factor X Deficiency, Coagulopathy of Renal Failure, Hypoprothrombinemia, Bleeding Disorder