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Coagulation Defects and Disorders News

Another Step Closer to Artificial Blood

Posted 3 hours 54 minutes ago by Drugs.com

SATURDAY, Dec. 3, 2016 – Artificial blood stored as a powder could one day revolutionize emergency medicine and provide trauma victims a better chance of survival. Researchers have created an artificial red blood cell that effectively picks up oxygen in the lungs and delivers it to tissues throughout the body. This artificial blood can be freeze-dried, making it easier for combat medics and paramedics to keep on hand for emergencies, said senior researcher Dr. Allan Doctor. He is a critical care specialist at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. "It's a dried powder that looks like paprika, basically," Doctor said. "It can be stored in an IV plastic bag that a medic would carry, either in their ambulance or in a backpack, for a year or more. When they need to use it, they spike the bag with sterile water, mix it, and it's ready to inject right then and there." The ... Read more

Related support groups: Blood Disorders, Bleeding Disorder, Anemia, Blood Transfusion, Diagnosis and Investigation, Coagulation Defects and Disorders, Blood Cell Transplantation

Pradaxa Blood Thinner May Beat Warfarin After Bleeding Episode: Study

Posted 2 days 22 hours ago by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Dec. 1, 2016 – Use of a blood thinner is routine for many heart patients, but these drugs come with a risk of episodes of excess bleeding. What, if any, anticoagulant (blood thinner) should these patients take after such episodes arise? A new study suggests that the blood thinner Pradaxa (dabigatran) may be a better choice than the standby drug warfarin in these cases. The reason: Pradaxa is less likely than warfarin to cause recurrent bleeding in patients who recently suffered a bleeding stroke or other major bleeding event, the researchers found. "Our results should encourage clinicians to seriously consider resuming anticoagulation among patients who survived a major bleeding event, particularly if the source of bleeding was identified and addressed," said study senior author Dr. Samir Saba. He's associate chief of cardiology at the University of Pittsburgh Heart and ... Read more

Related support groups: Bleeding Disorder, Warfarin, Coumadin, Ischemic Stroke, Xarelto, Pradaxa, Lovenox, Eliquis, Transient Ischemic Attack, Heparin, Rivaroxaban, Enoxaparin, Ischemic Stroke - Prophylaxis, Apixaban, Fragmin, Clexane, Arixtra, Hep-Pak, Intracranial Hemorrhage, Jantoven

Testosterone Therapy May Be Linked to Serious Blood Clots

Posted 4 days ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 30, 2016 – Testosterone treatment can increase a man's risk of potentially fatal blood clots, a new study suggests. Researchers found that men taking the male hormone seem to have a 63 percent increased risk of a blood clot forming in a vein, a condition known as venous thromboembolism (VTE). These clots can cause a heart attack, stroke, organ damage or even death, according to the American Heart Association. "Risk peaks rapidly in the first six months of treatment and lasts for about nine months, and fades gradually thereafter," said lead researcher Dr. Carlos Martinez of the Institute for Epidemiology, Statistics and Informatics in Frankfurt, Germany. Millions of American men currently use testosterone pills, gels or injections, hoping that the male hormone will boost their sex drive, stamina and strength. It's been known for a while that the estrogen in birth control ... Read more

Related support groups: Bleeding Disorder, Testosterone, Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT), AndroGel, Testim, Deep Vein Thrombosis, Axiron, Androderm, Depo-Testosterone, Fortesta, Testopel, Sexual Deviations or Disorders, Hypoactive Sexual Desire Disorder, Testopel Pellets, Delatestryl, Coagulation Defects and Disorders, Venous Thromboembolism, Testim 5 g/packet, Striant, AndroGel 1.25 g/actuation

These Medicines Often Send Americans to ERs

Posted 12 days ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Nov. 22, 2016 – An estimated one in 250 Americans lands in the hospital emergency department each year because of a medication-related reaction or problem, a new federal study finds. Among adults 65 and older, the rate is about one in 100, the study authors said. Remarkably, the medicines causing the most trouble haven't changed in a decade, the researchers noted. Blood thinners, diabetes medicines and antibiotics top the list. These drugs accounted for 47 percent of emergency department visits for adverse drug events in 2013 and 2014, according to the analysis. Among older adults, blood thinners, diabetes medicines and opioid painkillers are implicated in nearly 60 percent of emergency department visits for adverse drug events. "The same drugs are causing the most problems," said study co-author Dr. Daniel Budnitz. The study doesn't tease out what went wrong. The reasons ... Read more

Related support groups: Pain, Suboxone, Oxycodone, Diabetes, Type 2, Back Pain, Hydrocodone, Methadone, Percocet, Tramadol, OxyContin, Vicodin, Norco, Fentanyl, Morphine, Codeine, Lortab, Opana, Warfarin, Coumadin, Subutex

Drug Combo for Irregular Heartbeat Might Raise Bleeding Risk

Posted 13 days ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Nov. 21, 2016 – Because the irregular heartbeat known as atrial fibrillation can trigger stroke-inducing clots, many patients are prescribed a blood thinner. But a new Canadian study suggests that combining one blood thinner, Pradaxa, with certain statin medications could raise the odds for bleeding in these patients. "An increase in the risk of bleeding requiring hospital admission or emergency department visits was seen with lovastatin [Mevacor] and simvastatin [Zocor] compared with the other statins," said study author Tony Antoniou, a pharmacist at St. Michael's Hospital in Toronto. His team tracked outcomes for nearly 46,000 patients ages 65 and older. All had atrial fibrillation and took Pradaxa (dabigatran) to reduce their risk of stroke. Those who also took either lovastatin or simvastatin had a 40 percent higher risk of bleeding than those who took other statins, the ... Read more

Related support groups: Bleeding Disorder, Atrial Fibrillation, Lipitor, Simvastatin, Crestor, Atorvastatin, Pravastatin, Pradaxa, Zocor, Lovastatin, Prevention of Thromboembolism in Atrial Fibrillation, Vytorin, Rosuvastatin, Pravachol, Livalo, Red Yeast Rice, Caduet, Simcor, Lescol, Lescol XL

Health Tip: Control a Bleeding Wound

Posted 9 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

-- Rinsing a wound with cold water helps clean it, but it may not be enough to prevent infection. Bleeding is the body's natural way of cleansing a wound. Then again, too much bleeding isn't healthy either. Here's how to stop heavy bleeding, courtesy of the American Academy of Family Physicians: If available, use a sterile or clean piece of cloth, gauze or tissue. Hold the material over the wound, gently applying pressure. Have another piece of clean material on hand. If the bleeding soaks the first piece, apply another clean piece on top, but don't remove the first piece. Hold the clean material in place for another 20 minutes with firm pressure. Raise a bleeding leg or arm above the level of your heart. Read more

Related support groups: Bleeding Disorder, Scrapes, Coagulation Defects and Disorders, Wound Cleansing, Minor Cuts, Wound Debridement, Minor Skin Conditions

Gene Test May ID Chemo Patients at Risk of Clots: Study

Posted 1 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Nov. 1, 2016 – Genetic testing could help identify breast cancer patients at high risk for the formation of blood clots in their veins, new research suggests. This problem, called venous thromboembolism (VTE), is a serious and potentially fatal complication that can occur during cancer treatment, particularly chemotherapy. Because breast cancer is one of the most common cancers, breast cancer patients account for a large number of cancer-related VTE cases, said study author Judith Brand. She's a postdoctoral researcher in the department of medical epidemiology and biostatistics at Karolinska Institute in Stockholm, Sweden. Venous thromboembolism is preventable through treatment with an anti-clotting drug. But side effects, such as bleeding, mean this therapy is not routinely used in patients undergoing chemotherapy, the researchers explained. The new study included more than ... Read more

Related support groups: Blood Disorders, Cancer, Warfarin, Coumadin, Breast Cancer, Xarelto, Prostate Cancer, Pradaxa, Lovenox, Eliquis, Colorectal Cancer, Lung Cancer, Heparin, Melanoma, Rivaroxaban, Enoxaparin, Fragmin, Apixaban, Clexane, Arixtra

Irregular Heart Rhythm Patients May Not Always Need Blood Thinners: Study

Posted 18 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Oct. 18, 2016 – People with an abnormal heart rhythm called atrial fibrillation typically take powerful blood thinners to prevent strokes. But, some patients who have implanted pacemakers or defibrillators may not always need the drugs, a new study suggests. Those who suffered only short bouts of atrial fibrillation – estimated at 20 seconds or less – were at no more risk for stroke or other heart complications than people without atrial fibrillation, the researchers found. "Some patients have atrial fibrillation 100 percent of the time, while others might have only a few seconds of atrial fibrillation once a year," explained study author Dr. Steven Swiryn. He's a clinical professor of cardiology at the Feinberg School of Medicine at Northwestern University in Chicago. "Where atrial fibrillation only happens rarely and lasts a short time, it can be difficult to detect," ... Read more

Related support groups: Warfarin, Coumadin, Atrial Fibrillation, Ischemic Stroke, Xarelto, Eliquis, Transient Ischemic Attack, Prevention of Thromboembolism in Atrial Fibrillation, Rivaroxaban, Ischemic Stroke - Prophylaxis, Apixaban, Thromboembolic Stroke Prophylaxis, Arixtra, Jantoven, Fondaparinux, Coagulation Defects and Disorders, Savaysa, Edoxaban, Arixtra 10 mg/dose, Arixtra 7.5 mg/dose

Sleep Apnea May Boost Risk for Post-Op Problems

Posted 17 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Oct. 17, 2016 – Sleep apnea may boost the odds of developing two serious health complications following surgery. So, finding out if you have the sleep disorder beforehand – and seeking treatment – could boost your odds for good recovery from surgery, researchers say. The two post-op complications are blood clots in the veins and an irregular heartbeat called atrial fibrillation, according to two new studies. These problems occurred more often among surgical patients who had not yet been diagnosed – and therefore weren't treated – with sleep apnea. Obstructive sleep apnea is characterized by repeated breathing disruptions during sleep. Symptoms include excessive daytime sleepiness, restless sleep and loud snoring – often with periods of silence followed by gasps. More than half of surgery patients who have sleep apnea don't know it, the authors of one new study said. ... Read more

Related support groups: Blood Disorders, Bleeding Disorder, Atrial Fibrillation, Sleep Apnea, Prevention of Thromboembolism in Atrial Fibrillation, Obstructive Sleep Apnea/Hypopnea Syndrome, Coagulation Defects and Disorders

Some Increased Bleeding Risk Seen With Blood Thinner Xarelto Vs. Pradaxa

Posted 3 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Oct. 3, 2016 – The blood thinner Xarelto may pose a slightly greater risk of serious bleeding than Pradaxa in patients with the abnormal heartbeat known as atrial fibrillation, new research suggests. Most patients with the condition take a blood thinner to reduce the risk of stroke. Although these drugs help prevent stroke, they can also cause uncontrollable bleeding, which can be fatal, the researchers said. Two newer drugs – Xarelto (rivaroxaban) and Pradaxa (dabigatran) – are replacing the older drug warfarin, a medication that is notoriously difficult to monitor. Which of these newer drugs is safer, however, hasn't been proven, said the U.S. Food and Drug Administration researchers behind the new study. "There are now several new oral anticoagulants and we don't have a lot of studies that compare one to the other," said Dr. Rita Redberg. A professor of cardiology at the ... Read more

Related support groups: Warfarin, Coumadin, Atrial Fibrillation, Xarelto, Pradaxa, Prevention of Thromboembolism in Atrial Fibrillation, Jantoven, Coagulation Defects and Disorders, Reversal of Dabigatran

Clot Retrieval Device Approval Expanded

Posted 6 Sep 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Sept. 6, 2016 – Two similar devices that help doctors retrieve blood clots and avoid potential disability among stroke victims have been approved for new uses by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The Trevo devices were first cleared in 2012 to help people who could not be given the clot-busting drug t-PA. The devices, when fully expanded to up to six millimeters in diameter, allow doctors to grip a blood clot inside a vessel and remove it via catheter or sheath, the FDA said in a news release. The new approval expands the devices' use to include a broader group of patients, the agency said. Stroke kills some 130,000 people in the United States annually, making it the 5th-leading cause of death, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Potential risks of the devices include failure to retrieve a clot, device breakage and blood vessel damage. The ... Read more

Related support groups: Bleeding Disorder, Ischemic Stroke, Transient Ischemic Attack, Ischemic Stroke - Prophylaxis, Coagulation Defects and Disorders, IV Catheter Clot

Is Binge-Watching Hazardous to Your Health?

Posted 26 Jul 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, July 25, 2016 – Binge-watchers, beware: Too much time in front of the TV could boost your risk of death from a blood clot in the lung, researchers warn. A lung blood clot (pulmonary embolism) typically begins as a clot in the leg or pelvis that develops due to inactivity and reduced blood flow. The clot can break free and travel to a lung and lodge in a small blood vessel, posing a serious threat. This new study included more than 86,000 people in Japan, aged 40 to 70. They were asked how many hours they spent watching television and then were followed for 19 years. During that time, 59 participants died of a pulmonary embolism. Compared to those who watched less than 2.5 hours of television a day, the risk of dying from pulmonary embolism increased 70 percent among those who watched 2.5 to 4.9 hours daily. It was 40 percent greater for each additional two hours of television ... Read more

Related support groups: Blood Disorders, Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT), Pulmonary Embolism, Pulmonary Embolism - First Event, Deep Vein Thrombosis, Deep Vein Thrombosis - First Event, Deep Vein Thrombosis - Recurrent Event, Pulmonary Embolism - Recurrent Event, Deep Vein Thrombosis - Prophylaxis, Coagulation Defects and Disorders

2 New Findings Offer Hope for Those With Severe Hemophilia

Posted 26 May 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, May 25, 2016 – Two new studies could pave the way to major changes in how doctors treat severe cases of hemophilia – a rare genetic disorder that can cause uncontrolled bleeding. Both studies tackle a key challenge: Up to one-third of children with severe hemophilia develop antibodies against the standard therapy. But one study highlights the value of an old therapy, while the other shows promising early results with an experimental drug. Experts said both should stir discussion among doctors, patients and parents who deal with hemophilia. But they were especially hopeful about the new drug, known as emicizumab. In the United States, about 20,000 people – mostly boys and men – are living with hemophilia, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The disorder is caused by a defect in one of the genes that controls proteins needed for normal blood ... Read more

Related support groups: Blood Disorders, Bleeding Disorder, Anemia, Blood Transfusion, Hemophilia A, Hemophilia, Coagulation Defects and Disorders, Hemophilia B, Blood Cell Transplantation, Hemophilia A with Inhibitors

Is Daily Blood Thinner Needed for Irregular Heartbeat?

Posted 7 May 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, May 6, 2016 – A smartphone app might offer an alternative for certain patients with an irregular heartbeat who must take risky blood-thinning medication every day to lower their risk for stroke. New research suggests some people with atrial fibrillation might do just as well by diligently monitoring their pulse, perhaps recording their heartbeat via a smartphone EKG, and only taking such drugs on an as-needed basis. Atrial fibrillation is a serious condition characterized by an abnormal or irregular heart rhythm. Uncontrolled, it can lead to blood clotting and stroke. Blood-thinning drugs, called anticoagulants, are the usual treatment. For years, the blood thinner warfarin (Coumadin) has been the top go-to drug for such patients. "The problem is that long-term use of anticoagulants is associated with an increased risk of bleeding," explained study co-author Dr. Francis ... Read more

Related support groups: Bleeding Disorder, Warfarin, Coumadin, Atrial Fibrillation, Xarelto, Arrhythmia, Pradaxa, Eliquis, Prevention of Thromboembolism in Atrial Fibrillation, Rivaroxaban, Apixaban, Jantoven, Dabigatran, Coagulation Defects and Disorders, Reversal of Dabigatran

Restoring Blood Flow Beats Exercise for Poor Leg Circulation

Posted 5 May 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, May 5, 2016 – For people with poor circulation in their leg arteries, a medical procedure to restore blood flow may have greater benefits than exercise, preliminary research suggests. People with peripheral artery disease (PAD) experience pain and fatigue while walking. These symptoms develop because poor circulation in the arteries that supply blood to the limbs causes damage and scarring in the muscles, the researchers explained. There is currently no way to reverse the scarring associated with PAD. But a procedure to reopen or bypass blockages in the blood vessels and restore blood flow to the limbs – also known as revascularization – prevents it from getting worse, the researchers said. For the study, the researchers analyzed levels of a protein, called TGF-Beta1, that triggers scarring in patients with severe PAD. The investigators also measured levels of collagen, ... Read more

Related support groups: Blood Disorders, Peripheral Arterial Disease, Coagulation Defects and Disorders

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