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Coagulation Defects and Disorders News

Imbruvica Approval Expanded to Include Graft Versus Host Disease

Posted 14 days ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 2, 2017 – The U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Wednesday expanded approval for the anti-cancer drug Imbruvica (ibrutinib) to include adults with chronic graft versus host disease (cGVHD). cGVHD is a deadly condition that affects up to 70 percent of people who receive a stem cell transplant to treat cancers of the blood or bone marrow, the FDA said in a news release. The condition occurs when the transplanted cells attack healthy cells in a patient's tissues. "This approval highlights how a known treatment for cancer is finding a new use in treating a serious and life-threatening condition that may occur in patients with blood cancer who receive a stem cell transplant," said Dr. Richard Pazdur, director of the FDA's Oncology Center of Excellence. Use of Imbruvica to treat cGVHD was studied in a clinical trial of 42 people whose symptoms lingered despite standard ... Read more

Related support groups: Prednisone, Bleeding Disorder, Methylprednisolone, Prednisolone, Hydrocortisone, Medrol, Cortisone, Dexamethasone, Triamcinolone, Betamethasone, Budesonide, Decadron, Blood Transfusion, Entocort, Solu-Medrol, Entocort EC, Florinef, Imbruvica, Fludrocortisone, Cortef

10 Factors to Predict Bleeding Risk in Stroke Survivors

Posted 14 days ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 2, 2017 – Stroke survivors at high risk for bleeding from drugs meant to prevent another stroke can be identified using a new scoring system, new research contends. Many patients who have an ischemic stroke – which occurs when a clot blocks blood flow to the brain – are given drugs to prevent another clot. But these anti-clotting medications increase the risk of bleeding problems that can cause disability or death. In the new report, researchers analyzed data from six large studies of people who survived a stroke or mini-stroke (transient ischemic attack). Just over 43,000 people were included in the analysis. Of those, 1,530 had a major bleeding event – defined as bleeding within the skull or that led to death, a hospital stay or disability. The risk of such an event was 1.9 percent in the first year and 4.6 percent over three years, the investigators found. To ... Read more

Related support groups: Bleeding Disorder, Ischemic Stroke, Ischemic Stroke - Prophylaxis, Bleeding Associated with Coagulation Defect, Coagulation Defects and Disorders

McCain's Recovery Time After Surgery Uncertain, Experts Say

Posted 17 Jul 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, July 17, 2017 – A pending pathology report will reveal the health risk posed by a blood clot that forced U.S. Sen. John McCain to undergo brain surgery last week, experts say. The future of the Affordable Care Act may rest on McCain's recovery and return to Congress. A Senate vote to repeal the ACA – often called Obamacare – was shelved after McCain, 80, underwent a minimally invasive craniotomy above his left eye Friday. Doctors drilled into his skull and removed a roughly 2-inch blood clot, according to a statement from his office. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell needs McCain's support if he is to dismantle the ACA, a longstanding Republican goal. Repeal of the Obama health care act will require approval from 50 of the Senate's 52 Republicans, and two have already pledged to oppose the bill. McConnell has said voting will start when McCain, who is serving his sixth ... Read more

Related support groups: Ischemic Stroke, Head Injury, Transient Ischemic Attack, Ischemic Stroke - Prophylaxis, Surgical Prophylaxis, Coagulation Defects and Disorders

Viagra Might Make for a Safer, More Effective Stent

Posted 11 Jul 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, July 10, 2017 – It's worked wonders for men battling erectile dysfunction, and now early research suggests that Viagra – when added to artery-opening stents – might cut a patient's odds for clots. Stents are tiny mesh tubes surgically inserted to prop up failing blood vessels. But as South Korean researchers explained, these devices can become less effective over time as the growth of tissue around the metal device narrows the artery again. But in their new study in rats, the researchers found that coating stents with Viagra (sildenafil) might help prevent this re-closure from happening. "If similar results are found in clinical trials, sildenafil could be an ideal drug for coating drug-eluting [emitting] stents or to give orally after stent implantation," study lead author Dr. Han-Mo Yang said in a news release from the American Heart Association. Yang is an associate ... Read more

Related support groups: Viagra, Sildenafil, Revatio, Coagulation Defects and Disorders, Cardiothoracic Surgery

FDA Approves New Drug, Endari, for Sickle Cell Disease

Posted 7 Jul 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, July 7, 2017 – The U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Friday approved the first new drug for sickle cell disease in nearly two decades. Endari (L-glutamine oral powder) helps reduce severe complications associated with the blood disorder, the agency said. Sickle cell disease is an inherited disorder in which the red blood cells are shaped like a sickle, which limits the flow of vital oxygen to organs and tissues. In turn, this triggers severe pain and organ damage. Approximately 100,000 Americans, mostly minorities, have sickle cell disease, according to the U.S. National Institutes of Health. "Endari is the first treatment approved for patients with sickle cell disease in almost 20 years," said Dr. Richard Pazdur, acting director of the Office of Hematology and Oncology Products at the FDA's Center for Drug Evaluation and Research. "Until now, only one other drug was ... Read more

Related support groups: Blood Disorders, Bleeding Disorder, Anemia, Anemia - Sickle Cell, Coagulation Defects and Disorders

Blood Shortage Prompts Call for Donations

Posted 6 Jul 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, July 6, 2017 – The American Red Cross needs your blood, and it needs it now. The group issued an emergency call for donations on Wednesday. Over the past two months, there have been about 61,000 fewer donations than what is needed, the organization said. "The decline in summer donations is causing a significant draw-down of our overall blood supply, and we urgently need people to give now to restock hospital shelves and help save lives," said Shaun Gilmore, president of Red Cross Biomedical Services. The July 4th holiday has been especially challenging: Nearly 700 fewer blood drives were held this week than during an average week. That's the equivalent of no blood drives nationwide for an entire day, the agency explained. "Every day, patients recovering from accidents or those receiving treatments for cancer or blood disorders rely on lifesaving blood products, regardless of ... Read more

Related support groups: Blood Disorders, Bleeding Disorder, Iron Deficiency Anemia, Blood Transfusion, Thalassemia, Coagulation Defects and Disorders, Blood Cell Transplantation

FDA Approves Rebinyn (Coagulation Factor IX (Recombinant), GlycoPEGylated) for Patients with Hemophilia B

Posted 27 Jun 2017 by Drugs.com

PLAINSBORO, N.J., May 31, 2017 /PRNewswire/ – Novo Nordisk today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved the Biologics License Application for Rebinyn (Coagulation Factor IX (Recombinant), GlycoPEGylated) for the treatment of adults and children with hemophilia B. Hemophilia B is a chronic and inherited bleeding disorder that affects approximately 5,000 people in the U.S.1 People with hemophilia B have deficient blood clotting factor IX activity that results in prolonged or spontaneous bleeding, especially into the muscles, joints or internal organs.2 Rebinyn® is the brand name for nonacog beta pegol, N9-GP. Rebinyn® is indicated for on-demand treatment and control of bleeding episodes, and the perioperative management of bleeding in adults and children with hemophilia B. Rebinyn® is not indicated for routine prophylaxis or for immune tolerance in ... Read more

Related support groups: Hemophilia B, Coagulation Defects and Disorders, Hemophilia, Coagulation Modifiers, Coagulation Factor Ix, Rebinyn

Common Food Nutrient Tied to Risky Blood Clotting

Posted 25 Apr 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, April 24, 2017 – A nutrient in meat and eggs may conspire with gut bacteria to make the blood more prone to clotting, a small study suggests. The nutrient is called choline. Researchers found that when they gave 18 healthy volunteers choline supplements, it boosted their production of a chemical called TMAO. That, in turn, increased their blood cells' tendency to clot. But the researchers also found that aspirin might reduce that risk. TMAO is short for trimethylamine N-oxide. It's produced when gut bacteria digest choline and certain other substances. Past studies have linked higher TMAO levels in the blood to heightened risks of blood clots, heart attack and stroke, said Dr. Stanley Hazen, the senior researcher on the new study. These findings, he said, give the first direct evidence that choline revs up TMAO production in the human gut, which then makes platelets (a type of ... Read more

Related support groups: Aspirin, Ischemic Stroke, Heart Attack, Excedrin, Transient Ischemic Attack, Myocardial Infarction, Aggrenox, Alka-Seltzer, Fiorinal, Excedrin Migraine, Arthritis Pain, Ecotrin, Ischemic Stroke - Prophylaxis, Fiorinal with Codeine, Arthritis Pain Formula, Bayer Aspirin, Norgesic, Soma Compound, Excedrin Extra Strength, Norgesic Forte

Nerve 'Zap' Treatment May Speed Stroke Recovery

Posted 1 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, March 1, 2017 – An implanted device that provides electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve leading to the brain enhanced arm movement in a small group of stroke patients, researchers report. Evaluating 17 stroke patients with chronic arm weakness who also received intense physical therapy, scientists found that three-quarters improved with vagus nerve stimulation (VNS), while only one-quarter of those receiving "sham" nerve stimulation did. "Arm weakness affects three of every four of our stroke patients and persists to a disabling degree in at least 50 percent of them, so it's a hugely important problem in the long term," explained study author Dr. Jesse Dawson. He's director of the Scottish Stroke Research Network and a clinical researcher at University of Glasgow. "A unique aspect of this [device] is that patients can deliver the brain stimulation technique in their own ... Read more

Related support groups: Ischemic Stroke, Transient Ischemic Attack, Ischemic Stroke - Prophylaxis, Coagulation Defects and Disorders

Study Tracks Bleeding Risk From Common Blood Thinners

Posted 28 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Feb. 28, 2017 – Blood thinners can help prevent dangerous clots, but they also come with risks for excess bleeding. Now, new research shows that use of the medications does boost the odds of "subdural hematomas" – bleeds occurring within the skull and near the brain. And some blood thinners carry higher risk than others. The Danish research team stressed that the results don't mean patients who need blood thinners should avoid them altogether – just that their data adds to decisions around their use. "The present data add one more piece of evidence to the complex risk-benefit equation of [blood thinner] use," wrote a team led by Dr. David Gaist, of Odense University Hospital and the University of Southern Denmark. Despite the bleeding risk, "it is known that these drugs result in net benefits overall in patients with clear therapeutic indications," the study authors added. ... Read more

Related support groups: Bleeding Disorder, Aspirin, Warfarin, Coumadin, Plavix, Xarelto, Pradaxa, Eliquis, Excedrin, Clopidogrel, Aggrenox, Alka-Seltzer, Fiorinal, Excedrin Migraine, Arthritis Pain, Ecotrin, Fiorinal with Codeine, Norgesic, Arthritis Pain Formula, Bayer Aspirin

'Ablation' Procedure Helps 3 out of 4 Patients With Irregular Heartbeat

Posted 25 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 25, 2017 – Just how successful is the procedure called catheter ablation at fixing irregular heartbeats that can be potentially fatal? Pretty successful, a new study found, but there are caveats. Burning or freezing specific areas of the heart can alleviate the common irregular heart beat called atrial fibrillation in 74 percent of patients. However, the procedure doesn't work for everyone and there are risks of complications, researchers report. Atrial fibrillation increases the risk of early death by two times in women and 1.5 times in men. It causes 20 to 30 percent of all strokes and can decrease quality of life due to palpitations, shortness of breath, tiredness, weakness and psychological distress, the study authors explained. About 2.7 million Americans suffer from atrial fibrillation, according to the American Heart Association. For those whose atrial ... Read more

Related support groups: Blood Disorders, Warfarin, Coumadin, Atrial Fibrillation, Arrhythmia, Pradaxa, Prevention of Thromboembolism in Atrial Fibrillation, Cardiac Arrhythmia, Jantoven, Dabigatran, Coagulation Defects and Disorders, Atrial Tachycardia, Bivalirudin, Acova, Dicumarol, Argatroban, Refludan, Desirudin, Angiomax, Lepirudin

Could a Therapy for Irregular Heartbeat Harm the Brain?

Posted 24 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Jan. 24, 2017 – Catheter ablation is a common treatment for a form of irregular heartbeat known as premature ventricular contractions. Now, a small new study suggests the approach may put some patients at risk for brain injury. The findings are preliminary, but are "relevant to a large number of patients undergoing this procedure," study senior author Dr. Gregory Marcus said in a news release from the University of California, San Francisco. The study suggests that the procedure may help encourage the formation of brain lesions. Marcus, who directs clinical research at UCSF's department of cardiology, said he hopes the research "will inspire many studies to understand the meaning of and how to mitigate these lesions." The study included 18 patients who underwent catheter ablation for premature ventricular contractions (PVCs) – a type of abnormal heartbeat originating in a ... Read more

Related support groups: Bleeding Disorder, Arrhythmia, Diagnosis and Investigation, Brain Anomalies incl Congenital, Coagulation Defects and Disorders, Premature Ventricular Depolarizations, Head Imaging

Blood Banks Face Seasonal Shortages, New Screening Rules

Posted 23 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Dec. 23, 2016 – There's typically a shortage of both blood and platelets during the holiday season. But, tighter testing for a rare complication of transfusions makes the need for platelets even more urgent, experts at UT Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas say. Platelets are a component of blood that are essential for clotting. The complication, called transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI), is the leading cause of death due to transfusions, the experts said. "One reason the supply of blood platelets has decreased is that we now have additional required testing of platelets after donation," said Dr. Thomas Froehlich, medical director at the Harold C. Simmons Comprehensive Cancer Center. Blood and platelet shortages are traditionally common during the holidays. The shortages put cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy, trauma victims and people with health issues that ... Read more

Related support groups: Blood Disorders, Bleeding Disorder, Anemia, Blood Transfusion, Folic Acid Deficiency, Coagulation Defects and Disorders, Bleeding Associated with Coagulation Defect, Anemia Associated with Chronic Disease, Blood Cell Transplantation

Taking a Holiday Trip? Protect Yourself From Blood Clots

Posted 16 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Dec. 16, 2016 – Many Americans will travel afar to celebrate the holidays, potentially putting themselves at risk for deadly blood clots. Sitting for long periods in a car or airplane can limit blood circulation and cause a condition called deep vein thrombosis (DVT). In DVT, blood clots form in the deep veins of the lower legs and thighs. A clot can travel through the bloodstream and lodge in the brain, lungs, heart and other areas, causing severe organ damage and even death. But deep vein thrombosis is easy to prevent, according to Dr. Alan Lumsden, chief of cardiovascular surgery at Houston Methodist DeBakey Heart & Vascular Center. "If you plan to travel overseas or cross-country, make sure you get up and walk around at least every two hours, and try not to sleep more than four hours at a time. Drink plenty of water or juices, wear loose-fitting clothing, eat light meals ... Read more

Related support groups: Blood Disorders, Bleeding Disorder, Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT), Pulmonary Embolism, Deep Vein Thrombosis, Deep Vein Thrombosis - First Event, Deep Vein Thrombosis - Recurrent Event, Deep Vein Thrombosis - Prophylaxis, Coagulation Defects and Disorders

Drones a Safe Way to Transport Blood: Study

Posted 9 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Dec. 9, 2016 – Blood products don't seem to suffer damage when transported by drones, researchers report. The findings lend support to advocates who say that drones could offer a safe, effective and fast way to deliver blood products to accident sites, natural disasters or remote locations. "My vision is that, in the future, when a first responder arrives to the scene of an accident, he or she can test the victim's blood type right on the spot and send for a drone to bring the correct blood product," study first author Dr. Timothy Amukele said in a Johns Hopkins University news release. He is an assistant professor of pathology at the university's School of Medicine in Baltimore. Amukele and his Hopkins colleagues placed large bags of blood products – the size used for transfusion – into a cooler loaded on a drone that was flown 8 to 12 miles at about 328 feet off the ground. ... Read more

Related support groups: Blood Disorders, Anemia, Blood Transfusion, Coagulation Defects and Disorders, Blood Cell Transplantation

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von Willebrand's Disease, Factor IX Deficiency, Anticoagulation During Pregnancy, Bleeding Associated with Coagulation Defect, Antithrombin III Deficiency, Factor VII Deficiency, Hemophilia, Factor XIII Deficiency, Congenital Fibrinogen Deficiency, Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation, Factor X Deficiency, Coagulopathy of Renal Failure, Hypoprothrombinemia, Bleeding Disorder