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Related terms: Clostridium difficile-Associated Diarrhea, CDAD, CDI, Clostridium difficile Infection

'Good' Donor Bacteria Can Last Long Term in Stool Transplant Patients

Posted 11 days ago by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, June 16, 2017 – Researchers say their small study offers the first proof that therapeutic donor microbes remain for months or years in patients who've undergone stool transplants. Medically known as "fecal microbiota transplantation" (FMT), the procedure is used to treat severe diarrhea and colitis caused by repeated Clostridium difficile infections, the researchers explained. FMT is an increasingly popular treatment for C. difficile infections, with a 90 percent success rate. It involves collecting stool from a healthy donor and mixing it with salt water. The solution is then transferred to the patient's digestive tract through a thin, flexible tube called a colonoscope, or through the nose. C. difficile gut infections can be deadly. They often follow use of antibiotics that change the normal balance of bacteria in a patient's gut. C. difficile is increasingly resistant to ... Read more

Related support groups: Gastroenteritis, Infectious Gastroenteritis, Clostridial Infection, Prevention of Clostridium Difficile Infection Recurrence

U.S. Hospitals Still Prescribe Too Many Antibiotics: Study

Posted 12 days ago by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, June 15, 2017 – About 20 percent of U.S. hospital patients who receive antibiotics experience side effects from the drugs, researchers report. The new study included nearly 1,500 hospitalized adults who were prescribed antibiotics. The findings revealed that one-fifth of those who experienced antibiotic-related side effects didn't require the drugs in the first place. The results add to growing evidence that antibiotics are overused, according to the Johns Hopkins Hospital researchers. "Too often, clinicians prescribe antibiotics even if they have a low suspicion for a bacterial infection, thinking that even if antibiotics may not be necessary, they are probably not harmful. But that is not always the case," said Dr. Pranita Tamma. She is director of the hospital's Pediatric Antimicrobial Stewardship Program. Antibiotics can cause real harm and doctors should always consider ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Doxycycline, Bacterial Infection, Bactrim, Cipro, Ciprofloxacin, Augmentin, Levaquin, Trimethoprim, Sulfamethoxazole, Nitrofurantoin, Bacterial Skin Infection, Minocycline, Clavulanate, Macrobid, Levofloxacin, Bactrim DS, Tetracycline, Amoxicillin/Clavulanate, Avelox

Study Suggests Heartburn Meds-Superbug Infections Link

Posted 27 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, March 27, 2017 – Patients who take certain heartburn medications may be more likely to suffer recurrent bouts of a common "superbug" infection, a new study suggests. Proton pump inhibitors, such as Prilosec, Prevacid and Nexium, or so-called H2 blockers, such as Zantac, Pepcid and Tagamet, were linked to a 50 percent increased risk of developing multiple Clostridium difficile infections, researchers found. However, the study did not prove these heartburn medications cause recurrent C. difficile infections, just that an association appears to exist. And one specialist not involved with the study said the findings won't make him change his prescribing patterns. C. difficile can cause diarrhea and life-threatening inflammation of the colon. In the United States, about half a million people get sick from C. difficile each year. In recent years, these infections have become more ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, GERD, Bacterial Infection, Omeprazole, Nexium, Prilosec, Zantac, Protonix, Pantoprazole, Ranitidine, Lansoprazole, Dexilant, Prevacid, Pepcid, Barrett's Esophagus, Aciphex, Famotidine, Heartburn Relief, Esomeprazole, Rabeprazole

Many Americans Unaware of 'Superbug' Threat: Poll

Posted 27 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Feb. 27, 2017 – Antibiotic-resistant "superbugs" are a major public health threat, but most Americans are clueless about the dangers, a new HealthDay/Harris Poll shows. More than two-thirds of U.S. adults know "little" or "nothing" about so-called superbugs – bacterial infections that are resistant to many or all antibiotics. And around half believe, incorrectly, that antibiotics work against viruses. That's a concern because improper antibiotic use is considered the major driver of the superbug problem – a problem with deadly consequences. "This poll shows that public ignorance is a huge part of the problem," said Humphrey Taylor, chairman emeritus of The Harris Poll. "Millions of patients continue to believe that antibiotics will help them recover from colds, flu and other viral infections," Taylor said, "and they can be upset with their doctors if they will not prescribe ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Doxycycline, Bacterial Infection, Azithromycin, Bactrim, Cipro, Ciprofloxacin, Augmentin, Levaquin, Zithromax, Sulfamethoxazole, Erythromycin, Bacterial Skin Infection, Minocycline, Clarithromycin, Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus Infection, Clavulanate, Levofloxacin, Bactrim DS, Tetracycline

Think You're Allergic to Penicillin? Check Again

Posted 6 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Feb. 6, 2017 – Many people who think they're allergic to penicillin don't really have an allergy to this antibiotic, a pediatric expert says. And anyone who thinks they have had an allergic reaction to penicillin should undergo an allergy test to ensure they really need to avoid these important drugs, Dr. Min Lee advised. She is a pediatric allergist at UT Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas. "Penicillins are some of the safest and cheapest antibiotics available, and people who are reported to be allergic often get antibiotics that are costlier and potentially more toxic," Lee said in a news release from the medical center. According to UT Southwestern researchers, 90 percent of people who have a penicillin allergy listed in their medical records didn't actually have a reaction when exposed to the medication during an allergy test. Doctors can test for a penicillin allergy in ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Allergic Rhinitis, Hay Fever, Epinephrine, Anaphylaxis, EpiPen, Clostridial Infection, Nasal Polyps, Adrenalin, Primatene Mist, Septocaine, EpiPen 2-Pak, Primatene Mist Inhaler, Epinephrine/Lidocaine, Ana-Kit, Prevention of Clostridium Difficile Infection Recurrence, Articaine/Epinephrine, EpiPen Jr, Bupivacaine/Epinephrine

Drug May Be New Weapon Against a 'Superbug'

Posted 25 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 25, 2017 – A newly approved drug may help in the battle against Clostridium difficile – a potentially fatal "superbug" gut infection that has become a scourge in U.S. hospitals. In two clinical trials, researchers found that the drug, called bezlotoxumab (Zinplava), cut the risk of a recurrent C. difficile infection by almost 40 percent. That's important, because the gut infection commonly comes back after treatment with antibiotics – around 20 percent of the time, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The infection can also make people seriously ill, with symptoms ranging from diarrhea to life-threatening inflammation of the colon, the CDC says. Zinplava has already been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, and it should be available early this year, according to Merck, the drug's maker. That approval was based on the ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Diarrhea, Bacterial Infection, Clostridial Infection, Diarrhea, Acute, Infectious Diarrhea, Prevention of Clostridium Difficile Infection Recurrence, Zinplava, Bezlotoxumab

Antibiotic Overuse Behind 'Superbug' Outbreak in U.K. Hospitals

Posted 25 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 25, 2017 – Overuse of antibiotics triggered a severe diarrhea outbreak in British hospitals that began in 2006, a new study reports. Researchers analyzed hospital data related to the outbreak of Clostridium difficile, a "superbug" gut infection. The investigators concluded that reducing the use of fluoroquinolones – antibiotics such as ciprofloxacin (Cipro) and levofloxacin (Levaquin) – curbed the outbreak. "These findings are of international importance because other regions, such as North America, where fluoroquinolone prescribing remains unrestricted, still suffer from epidemic numbers of C. difficile infections," said study co-author Derrick Crook. He is a professor of microbiology at the University of Oxford in England. Overuse of fluoroquinolones enabled antibiotic-resistant C. difficile to thrive because non-resistant bugs in the gut were killed off by the ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Diarrhea, Bacterial Infection, Cipro, Ciprofloxacin, Levaquin, Levofloxacin, Avelox, Diarrhea, Chronic, Ofloxacin, Ciprodex, Moxifloxacin, Clostridial Infection, Diarrhea, Acute, Gatifloxacin, Gemifloxacin, Factive, Infectious Diarrhea, Norfloxacin, Sparfloxacin

Study Questions 'Fecal Transplant' Treatment for Gut Infection

Posted 13 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Jan. 13, 2017 – A single fecal transplant delivered by enema is apparently no more effective than oral antibiotics in treating recurring cases of a nasty stomach bug, a Canadian study contends. The study is the first head-to-head comparison between fecal transplant and the current standard of care of antibiotics in treating Clostridium difficile infection, the researchers said. "We thought it was important to have that comparison so we could know: How much better is it than what we're actually already doing?" said lead author Dr. Susy Hota. She's the medical director of infection prevention and control at University Health Network in Toronto. In this study, "it looks like they're working about the same," Hota said. "In half the patients, it didn't work, but in the other half, it did." Infection from C. difficile bacteria can be debilitating, triggering bouts of diarrhea and ... Read more

Related support groups: Colonoscopy, Clostridial Infection, Diagnosis and Investigation, Prevention of Clostridium Difficile Infection Recurrence

U.S. Death Toll From Infectious Diseases Unchanged: Study

Posted 22 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Nov. 22, 2016 – The war against infectious diseases – medicine versus microbes – has been holding steady, with the U.S. death rate from these diseases about the same now as it was in 1980, new research says. But some of the specific disease threats have changed over the years, the study authors noted. Researchers found that the national death rate from infections stood at almost 46 deaths per 100,000 people in 2014. That compared with 42 per 100,000 in 1980. There were some major shifts during that time, however. The overall death rate went as high as 63 per 100,000 in 1995, owing to the HIV/AIDS epidemic, according to the study. AIDS deaths declined from then on, with the introduction of the "drug cocktails" that have turned HIV into a manageable chronic disease. But while there was progress against HIV, deaths from pneumonia and flu complications held steady over the ... Read more

Related support groups: Bacterial Infection, Influenza, Pneumonia, HIV Infection, Clostridial Infection, Viral Infection, West Nile Virus, Adjunct to Antibiotic Therapy, Prevention of Clostridium Difficile Infection Recurrence

FDA Approves Merck’s Zinplava (bezlotoxumab) to Reduce Recurrence of Clostridium difficile Infection

Posted 25 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

KENILWORTH, N.J.--(BUSINESS WIRE) October 21, 2016 --Merck (NYSE:MRK), known as MSD outside the United States and Canada, today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved Zinplava (bezlotoxumab) Injection 25 mg/mL. Merck anticipates making Zinplava available in first quarter 2017. Zinplava is indicated to reduce recurrence of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in patients 18 years of age or older who are receiving antibacterial drug treatment of CDI and are at high risk for CDI recurrence. Zinplava is not indicated for the treatment of CDI. Zinplava is not an antibacterial drug. Zinplava should only be used in conjunction with antibacterial drug treatment of CDI. CDI is caused by bacteria that produce toxins, including toxin B. Symptoms of CDI include mild-to-severe diarrhea, abdominal pain and fever. The incidence of recurrent CDI is higher in certain ... Read more

Related support groups: Clostridial Infection, Zinplava, Bezlotoxumab

If Patient in the Hospital Bed Before You Got Antibiotics -- Take Heed

Posted 10 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Oct. 10, 2016 – When a hospital patient is taking antibiotics, the next person to use the same bed may face an elevated risk of infection with the dangerous germ Clostridium difficile, a new study suggests. C. difficile, a bacterium that causes inflammation of the colon and causes life-threatening diarrhea, is found in U.S. hospitals. Scientists have known that antibiotic use can contribute to the germ's spread, but this new report says it's not just the patient taking the medication who's at risk. Because the germ spores can persist, patients later assigned to the same hospital bed may have increased odds of getting C. difficile, researchers found. "This study provides evidence that there is a herd effect with antibiotics," said lead researcher Dr. Daniel Freedberg, a gastroenterologist at Columbia University Medical Center in New York City. "In other words, antibiotics have ... Read more

Related support groups: Clostridial Infection

Frozen as Good as Fresh for Fecal Transplant: Study

Posted 12 Jan 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Jan. 12, 2016 – Researchers say they have verified the effectiveness of a quicker way to rid people of recurring C. difficile bacterial infection. A new clinical trial has shown that frozen stool samples work just as well as freshly donated samples when treating a tough C. difficile infection through a procedure called fecal transplantation. Doctors have used frozen stool samples to treat C. difficile for a couple of years, because the prepackaged samples allow for much easier and swifter treatment than identifying and screening a fresh donor, said lead author Dr. Christine Lee, director of the microbiology residency program at McMaster University in Ontario, Canada. "Donor screening can take one to two weeks," Lee said. "If a person requires fecal transplant right away, then that's not possible." The clinical trial showed that patients do not pay a price for the convenience ... Read more

Related support groups: Diarrhea, Bowel Preparation, Gastrointestinal Disorders, Diarrhea, Chronic, Clostridial Infection, Diagnosis and Investigation, Diarrhea, Acute, Fecal Incontinence

Post-Op Bacterial Infection Raises Odds for Complications, Death

Posted 25 Nov 2015 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 25, 2015 – People recuperating from surgery are much more likely to die or develop complications if they become infected with a dangerous diarrhea-causing bacteria, a new study suggests. Patients at VA hospitals who contracted Clostridium difficile following surgery were five times more likely to die and 12 times more likely to suffer a complication of the heart, lung, kidneys or nervous system, according to findings published online Nov. 25 in the journal JAMA Surgery. "C. difficile infection is a big hit to take for people who are already behind the eight-ball," said Dr. Brian Zuckerbraun, a surgeon at the VA Pittsburgh Healthcare System who co-wrote an accompanying editorial. "It's just a big insult to their system, when they are vulnerable." C. difficile is a tough and opportunistic bacteria that can invade the intestines of people whose gut bacteria have been wiped ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Surgery, Bacterial Infection, Bacterial Skin Infection, Clostridial Infection, Bacteremia

Review Finds Fecal Transplants Work Well But Need Tight Regulation

Posted 21 Oct 2015 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 21, 2015 – The growing use of fecal transplants needs to be carefully controlled, experts say. The therapy is increasingly being used to treat people with life-threatening intestinal infections, such as those caused by the bacterium Clostridium difficile. The procedure involves transferring fecal matter from a healthy donor into the intestine of a patient so that healthy bacteria can re-colonize the bowel. Researchers analyzed available evidence and found that fecal transplants were 85 percent successful in treating patients, compared with 20 percent for standard antibiotic treatment. A recent clinical trial was halted early because fecal transplantation proved so effective, with a 90 percent success rate compared to 26 percent for powerful antibiotics, the researchers noted. After more than 7,000 fecal transplants, few harmful effects have been reported and the ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Diabetes, Type 2, Irritable Bowel Syndrome, Colitis, Clostridial Infection, Pseudomembranous Colitis

Non-Antibiotic Medicine May Fight Drug-Resistant 'Superbug'

Posted 23 Sep 2015 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 23, 2015 – A new mouse study suggests that a drug with a known safety record in humans might be a new weapon in the fight against the potentially deadly intestinal infection known as C. difficile. The drug is called ebselen, and it was well-tolerated in humans when tested as a possible treatment in a variety of clinical trials, including for stroke and bipolar disorder. Although ebselen has never been approved as a treatment for any condition in humans, the current research team thought the drug might help prevent the spread of infection in people with C. difficile. When the researchers gave ebselen to infected mice, the drug appeared to knock out the toxic activity of C. difficile without inflicting the collateral damage on good bacteria that's normally associated with antibiotic treatment, the study reported. The results were "very encouraging," said study senior ... Read more

Related support groups: Clostridial Infection

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