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U.S. Kids Not Drinking Enough Water Each Day

Posted 11 Jun 2015 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, June 11, 2015 – Many American children and teens aren't consuming enough liquids – especially water – and that lack of hydration could affect their physical and mental health, a new study suggests. The findings "highlight a potential health issue that has not been given a whole lot of attention in the past," study author Erica Kenney, a postdoctoral research fellow in social and behavioral sciences at the Harvard School of Public Health, said in a Harvard news release. "Even though for most of these kids this is not an immediate, dramatic health threat, this is an issue that could really be reducing quality of life and well-being for many, many children and youth," she added. One expert in child health agreed. "Children – due to their slower acclimation to heat and greater surface area than adults – can be more susceptible to dehydration than adults," said Nancy ... Read more

Related support groups: Iodine, Tums, Epsom Salt, Magnesium Oxide, Klor-Con, Caltrate, Potassium Chloride, Copper, Dehydration, Sodium Chloride, Tri-K, Chromium Picolinate, Electrolyte, Calcium Carbonate, Calcium Citrate, Iodides, Sodium Bicarbonate, Zinc, Citracal, Potassium Gluconate

Health Tip: Avoiding Leg Cramps

Posted 20 May 2015 by Drugs.com

-- Painful leg cramps can happen to anyone, but tend to be common among seniors. The AARP recommends: Gently stretch and flex the leg to ease a cramp. Ask your doctor if a medication, such as a statin or diuretic, could be causing your leg cramps. Make sure your electrolyte levels are normal. Below-normal levels of potassium, magnesium or calcium could trigger leg cramps. Drink plenty of fluids. Make sure the covers aren't too tight on your bed. Choose shoes with proper arch support. Read more

Related support groups: Lipitor, Simvastatin, Crestor, Atorvastatin, Pravastatin, Iodine, Zocor, Lovastatin, Nocturnal Leg Cramps, Tums, Rosuvastatin, Epsom Salt, Magnesium Oxide, Klor-Con, Caltrate, Potassium Chloride, Copper, Sodium Chloride, Tri-K, Chromium Picolinate

Calcium Supplements Don't Raise Women's Heart Risks, Study Says

Posted 30 May 2014 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, May 30, 2014 – In the wake of concerns that calcium supplements increase the risk for heart attack or stroke, a large, new U.S. study offers women and their doctors some reassurance. Researchers from Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston found, in a study of more than 74,000 women, that these supplements are safe in terms of heart health. Millions of women take calcium supplements in an attempt to boost bone strength, especially after menopause when the risk of fractures increases. This is so even though experts generally recommend that calcium come from diet rather than supplements. "One study found that more than 60 percent of women 60 and over were taking calcium supplements," said lead researcher Dr. Julie Paik of the hospital's Channing Division of Network Medicine. Some recent research has linked calcium supplementation with heart disease. Such studies suggested the ... Read more

Related support groups: Dietary Supplementation, Tums, Caltrate, Prevention of Osteoporosis, Calcium Carbonate, Calcium Citrate, Citracal, PhosLo, Titralac, Oyster, Calcium Acetate, Oyster Shell, Os-Cal 500, Calcium Chloride, Os-Cal, Calcium Gluconate, Oyster Calcium, Phoslyra, Tums E-X, Oysco 500

Calcium May Cut Risk for Precancerous Colon Lesions in Some People

Posted 10 Apr 2013 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, April 10 – Consuming higher amounts of calcium may lower the likelihood of precancerous colon and rectal lesions in people who are at increased risk due to variations in two genes, a new study suggests. High calcium intake did not affect risk in people without the genetic variations. The findings may help explain inconsistent results in previous research about the link between calcium intake and the risk for these lesions, called colorectal adenomas, the researchers said. They also said the findings may help identify patients who would benefit from calcium supplements or higher levels of calcium in their diet. The study of nearly 6,000 people in Tennessee found that patients with the highest calcium intake had no reduced risk for colorectal adenomas if they had no variations in two genes – KCNJ1 and SLC12A1 – that are essential in calcium reabsorption in the kidneys. ... Read more

Related support groups: Colorectal Cancer, Tums, Caltrate, Calcium Carbonate, Calcium Citrate, Citracal, Pepcid Complete, Arthritis Pain Formula, Rolaids, PhosLo, Oyster, Titralac, Calcium Acetate, Oyster Shell, Titralac Plus, Os-Cal 500, Domeboro, Os-Cal, Calcium Chloride, Calcium Gluconate

Healthy Older Women Advised Against Taking Calcium

Posted 25 Feb 2013 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Feb. 25 – Healthy older women should not take calcium and vitamin D supplements to prevent fractures, according to a final recommendation issued Monday by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. In healthy adults, lower doses of calcium and vitamin D seem to be ineffective. As for higher doses, it's still up in the air, the government group said. The new recommendations do not apply to people who are known to be vitamin D-deficient or who already have osteoporosis, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) noted. Every year about 1.5 million fractures in the United States are attributed to osteoporosis, which is caused by a decrease in bone mass and density that makes bones fragile and more susceptible to a break. Almost half of all women older than 50 will have an osteoporosis-related fracture in their lifetime, according to the USPSTF. Calcium is one of the main ... Read more

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Calcium Supplements May Raise Odds of Heart Death in Women

Posted 12 Feb 2013 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Feb. 12 – Women eating a high-calcium diet and taking calcium supplements adding up to more than 1,400 milligrams a day may be running nearly twice the risk of dying from heart disease, a large Swedish study suggests. Both men and women take calcium supplements to prevent bone loss. The new findings come on the heels of another recent study that found a similar increased risk of death related to calcium intake among men. "Many older adults increase dietary intake of calcium or take calcium supplements to prevent bone loss and there had been speculation that increased calcium intake with or without vitamin D could improve cardiovascular health," said Dr. Gregg Fonarow, an American Heart Association spokesman who wasn't involved in the study. However, a number of recent studies have suggested that higher dietary intake or calcium supplementation may not only not improve ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Dietary Supplementation, Tums, Caltrate, Prevention of Osteoporosis, Calcium Carbonate, Calcium Citrate, Citracal, Pepcid Complete, Arthritis Pain Formula, Rolaids, Titralac, Oyster, Oyster Shell, Titralac Plus, Os-Cal 500, Os-Cal, Slow-Mag, Calcium Gluconate, Oyster Calcium

Calcium Supplements May Raise Men's Death Risk From Heart Disease

Posted 4 Feb 2013 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Feb. 4 – Men taking calcium supplements may be running a nearly 20 percent increased risk of dying from cardiovascular disease, a new study suggests. Both men and women take calcium supplements to prevent bone loss. In this study of calcium intake, the risk of dying from heart disease was higher for men but not for women. "Increasing evidence indicates that too much supplemental calcium might increase the risk of cardiovascular disease," said Susanna Larsson, an associate professor at the Institute of Environmental Medicine at the Karolinska Institute, in Stockholm. Larsson, who was not part of the study but wrote an accompanying journal editorial, added that "the paradigm 'the more the better' seems invalid for calcium supplementation." The report was published in the Feb. 4 online edition of the journal JAMA Internal Medicine. To find out if calcium supplements were ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Dietary Supplementation, Tums, Caltrate, Calcium Carbonate, Calcium Citrate, Citracal, PhosLo, Titralac, Oyster, Calcium Acetate, Oyster Shell, Os-Cal 500, Os-Cal, Oyster Calcium, Calcid, Tums E-X, Phoslyra, Oysco 500, Chooz

Calcium, Vitamin D Supplements May Pose Risks for Men With Prostate Cancer

Posted 9 Aug 2012 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Aug. 9 – Although they're standard treatment for men with prostate cancer who are taking hormonal therapy, calcium and vitamin D supplements may do more harm than good, according to a new study. Men who undergo hormone-depletion therapy for prostate cancer are at risk for osteoporosis, but the supplements do not prevent this bone loss and may actually boost patients' odds for heart disease and aggressive prostate cancer, research from Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center suggests. "Calcium and/or vitamin D supplementation to prevent loss of bone mineral density in these men seems so logical that no one had questioned whether it works," study co-author, Mridul Datta, a postdoctoral fellow at Wake Forest Baptist, explained in a hospital news release. "It wouldn't be so bad if there simply was no obvious benefit," added the study's lead author, Gary Schwartz, a prostate cancer ... Read more

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Vitamin D Plus Calcium May Extend Life

Posted 15 Jun 2012 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, June 15 – Seniors who take calcium supplements along with vitamin D may lengthen their lives, a new analysis suggests. However, only the combination of the two appears to be effective; vitamin D by itself had no benefit, the researchers noted. "Our study provides evidence of a cause-effect relationship – that calcium and vitamin D causes beneficial effects to general health," said study author Dr. Lars Rejnmark, an assistant professor at Aarhus University Hospital in Denmark. "Calcium with vitamin D has now been proven to reduce risk of osteoporotic fractures and death in the elderly." The report will be published in the August issue of the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism. For the study, Rejnmark's team collected data on more than 70,000 people who were around 70 years old and had taken part in one of eight trials that pitted vitamin D or vitamin D plus ... Read more

Related support groups: Vitamin D, Dietary Supplementation, Tums, Vitamin D3, Caltrate, Calcium Carbonate, Calcium Citrate, Citracal, Cholecalciferol, Ergocalciferol, Oyster, Titralac, Drisdol, Oyster Shell, Os-Cal, Os-Cal 500, Tums E-X, Calciferol, Calcid, Oysco 500

Older Women Should Not Take Calcium, Vitamin D: Task Force

Posted 12 Jun 2012 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, June 12 – A leading U.S. government advisory panel has proposed that postmenopausal women not take low-dose calcium and vitamin D supplements daily to ward off bone fractures. But the jury is still out on higher doses of these supplements, stated the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF), which issued the draft recommendations Tuesday. Public comment on the draft recommendations is invited until July 10. The news was a bit of a bombshell, given that women have been told for so long to take calcium and vitamin D, said Dr. Suzanne Steinbaum, director of women and heart disease at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City and a spokeswoman for the American Heart Association. "What we're really seeing is no role for calcium for the prevention of osteoporotic fractures. At this point, there's no reason to be taking calcium," she noted. But, the issue of which women should take ... Read more

Related support groups: Osteoporosis, Vitamin D, Tums, Vitamin D3, Caltrate, Prevention of Osteoporosis, Calcium Carbonate, Calcium Citrate, Citracal, Cholecalciferol, Ergocalciferol, Oyster, Titralac, Drisdol, Oyster Shell, Os-Cal, Os-Cal 500, Tums E-X, Calciferol, Oysco 500

Calcium Supplements May Be Bad for Your Heart: Study

Posted 23 May 2012 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, May 23 – Many older Americans take calcium supplements to prevent bone loss, but they may be significantly increasing their risk for a heart attack, a new study suggests. These supplements do not help prevent heart attacks or stroke as some previous research has suggested, the study authors say. But dietary calcium might reduce the risk, they noted. "While a moderately high intake of calcium from diet may go along with a lower risk of heart attack, this is not true for supplementary calcium intake," said lead researcher Sabine Rohrmann, from the division of cancer epidemiology and prevention at the Institute of Social and Preventive Medicine at the University of Zurich in Switzerland. "Instead of taking calcium supplements, men and women who want to increase their calcium intake should rely on foods, such as low-fat dairy products or mineral water, [that are] rich in ... Read more

Related support groups: Osteoporosis, Dietary Supplementation, Tums, Caltrate, Prevention of Osteoporosis, Calcium Carbonate, Calcium Citrate, Citracal, Titralac, Oyster, Oyster Shell, Os-Cal, Os-Cal 500, Calcium Gluconate, Oysco 500, Calcid, Chooz, Oyster Calcium, Tums E-X, Calcium Concentrate

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