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Health Tip: Design a Non-Toxic Nursery

Posted 2 days 2 hours ago by Drugs.com

-- After spending nine months making sure everything you eat is good for your growing baby, you'll want to create a nursery that's soothing and safe. Your baby typically will sleep for up to 16 hours a day for the first two years of life. The Environmental Working Group suggests how to make your nursery safer: Use low-volatile organic compounds (low-VOC) paint. VOCs are used to help paint dry, but they could affect your baby's health. Select true-wood furniture. Pressed wood, plywood, particleboard and chipboard are made from lumber scraps glued together under pressure. These ingredients may emit formaldehyde, an indoor air pollutant. Buy a safe crib mattress. It is safest to find one made of untreated natural fibers that have not been wrapped in polyvinyl chloride or treated with flame retardants. Keep floors wood. Carpets can entice dust mites and often contain flame retardants and ... Read more

Related support groups: Delivery, Poisoning, Toxic Reactions Incl Drug and Substance Abuse, Cesarean Section, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Does Mother's Mental Health Affect Pregnancy?

Posted 7 days ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 13, 2017 – Three common mental health disorders – depression, panic disorder and generalized anxiety disorder – pose no serious threat to pregnant women or the health of their babies, a new study finds. "I think a major take-home message is that women are not harming their babies if they have one of these psychiatric conditions," said study lead author Kimberly Yonkers of Yale University. She and her team followed more than 2,600 pregnant women at 137 clinical practices in Connecticut and Massachusetts. The researchers did find slight risks associated with certain psychiatric medications used to treat those conditions. For instance, babies of women who took benzodiazepines had slightly lower birth weights and needed additional ventilator support in 61 of 1,000 cases. Benzodiazepines, which include Xanax (alprazolam), Valium (diazepam) and Ativan (lorazepam), are ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Anxiety, Panic Disorder, Anxiety and Stress, Major Depressive Disorder, Dysthymia, Delivery, Psychiatric Disorders, Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation during Pregnancy/Lactation, Premature Labor, Depressive Psychosis, Cesarean Section, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Breast-Feeding Linked to Lower Endometriosis Risk

Posted 12 days ago by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Sept. 8, 2017 – Women who breast-fed at least one child appear to have a lower risk for developing endometriosis, new research suggests. Endometriosis is a chronic and often painful condition that occurs when the lining of the uterus grows outside of the reproductive organ on the fallopian tubes, ovaries or another area. "We found that women who breast-fed for a greater duration were less likely to be diagnosed with endometriosis," said study author Leslie Farland. She is a research scientist at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston. "Given the chronic nature of endometriosis and that very few modifiable risk factors are currently known, breast-feeding may be an important modifiable behavior to reduce the risk of endometriosis among women after pregnancy," Farland said in a hospital news release. The study involved thousands of women who participated in the Nurses' Health ... Read more

Related support groups: Menstrual Disorders, Endometriosis, Period Pain, Delivery, Dysmenorrhea, Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation during Pregnancy/Lactation, Lactation Suppression, Cesarean Section, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Researchers Find Genes Linked to Preterm Birth

Posted 14 days ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 6, 2017 – Researchers say they've pinpointed gene areas linked with preterm birth – and they said this could pave new ways to prevent the leading cause of death among children under age 5 worldwide. The team looked at DNA and other data from more than 50,000 women from the United States and northern European countries. The researchers identified six gene regions that influence the length of pregnancy and the timing of birth. "These are exciting findings that could play a key role in reducing newborn deaths and giving every child the chance to grow up smart and strong," said Trevor Mundel, president of the Global Health Division at the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. Preterm infants (born before 37 weeks of pregnancy) are at increased risk of death. Those who survive often have serious, lifelong health problems. The new study found that one of the gene areas ... Read more

Related support groups: Delivery, Selenium, Premature Labor, Diagnosis and Investigation, Cesarean Section, Apnea of Prematurity, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation, Chromic Chloride Hexahydrate/Copper Sulfate/Manganese Sulfate/Selenium/Sodium Iodide/Zinc Sulfate, MTE-7, Addamel N, Multitrace-5, PTE-5, MTE-5, Selenium TR, MTE-6, Chromic Chloride Hexahydrate/Copper Sulfate/Manganese Sulfate/Selenium/Zinc Sulfate, MulTE-PAK-5, Pediatrace, Multitrace-5 Concentrate

Does Immune System Hold Clues to Preterm Births?

Posted 19 days ago by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Sept. 1, 2017 – By learning more about the immune system changes that occur during pregnancy, scientists hope they can someday predict if babies will be born prematurely. "Pregnancy is a unique immunological state. We found that the timing of immune system changes follows a precise and predictable pattern in normal pregnancy," said study senior author Dr. Brice Gaudilliere. He's an assistant professor of anesthesiology, perioperative and pain medicine at Stanford University School of Medicine in California. If scientists can identify immune-system changes predicting premature birth, they say they might eventually develop a blood test to detect it. "Ultimately, we want to be able to ask, 'Does your immune clock of pregnancy run too slow or too fast?'" Gaudilliere said in a university news release. Nearly 10 percent of U.S. infants are born three or more weeks early. Currently, ... Read more

Related support groups: Delivery, Premature Labor, Labor Pain, Cesarean Section, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

America's New Dads Are Older Than Ever

Posted 30 Aug 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 30, 2017 – New dads may sport a few more gray hairs than in years past, a U.S. study finds. The average age of new fathers has risen in recent decades, research shows, raising questions about the possible social and public health impact. The study, which analyzed federal birth records, found that fathers of newborns are now 3.5 years older, on average, than their counterparts in the early 1970s. And the percentage of births to fathers older than 40 has more than doubled – from about 4 percent in 1972, to 9 percent in 2015. The pattern is not surprising, since it parallels what's been seen among U.S. women. But much less research has explored the changing demographics of American fathers, according to senior researcher Dr. Michael Eisenberg. "I think it's important for us to pay attention to these demographic shifts and what their implications could be for society," ... Read more

Related support groups: Birth Control, Contraception, Female Infertility, Delivery, Ovulation Induction, Oligospermia, Primary Ovarian Failure, Cesarean Section, Follicle Stimulation, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

1 in 5 Moms Mum About Post-Pregnancy Blues

Posted 29 Aug 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Aug. 29, 2017 – One in five new mothers who develops postpartum depression or another mood disorder after childbirth suffers in silence, a new study reveals. "Our study finds that many women who would benefit from treatment are not receiving it, because they don't tell anyone that they're dealing with any challenges," said study author Betty-Shannon Prevatt. She's a clinical psychologist and Ph.D. student at North Carolina State University. Prevatt and her colleagues asked 211 women who had given birth within the past three years to participate in an anonymous survey. The mothers were asked if they had any symptoms of postpartum mood disorders and if they told a doctor, nurse, lactation consultant or doula about these symptoms. They were also asked about any barriers that would prevent them from seeking care. "We know that 10 to 20 percent of women experience significant mood ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Postpartum Depression, Delivery, Cesarean Section, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Does Race Matter in Care 'Preemie' Babies Receive?

Posted 28 Aug 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Aug. 28, 2017 – Race and ethnicity can make a difference in the quality of care a premature baby receives in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), a new study finds. Top-quality hospitals in California tend to deliver better care to white babies compared with black or Hispanic newborns, researchers report. In addition, black and Hispanic infants are more likely than white newborns to receive care at poor-quality NICUs, the study found. While these trends are real, they were not present across the board, the researchers added. Some California hospitals provided better care to minority babies than white infants, for example. The disparities in care are caused by many social, economic and organizational factors in the hospital and its surrounding community, said lead researcher Dr. Jochen Profit. He's an associate professor of pediatrics with the Stanford University School of ... Read more

Related support groups: Delivery, Premature Labor, Labor Pain, Apnea of Prematurity, Cesarean Section, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Some Newborns Don't Get Heart Defect, Hearing Loss Tests

Posted 25 Aug 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Aug. 25, 2017 – Some newborns in the United States still aren't getting screened for hearing loss or congenital heart disease, a new report shows. "Newborn screening at birth is crucial to quickly identify infants at risk of hearing loss and congenital [inherited] heart disease so they can receive early intervention and follow-up care," said Dr. Brenda Fitzgerald, director of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. "Finding these conditions early can give infants the best chance to properly develop, and lead healthy lives," Fitzgerald added in an agency news release. Since the 1970s, newborns in the United States have been screened for numerous health conditions through dried bloodspots, the agency explained. An estimated 4 million babies undergo screening each year. Now, national recommendations suggest that newborns be screened for hearing loss and critical ... Read more

Related support groups: Delivery, Premature Labor, Hearing Loss, Brain Anomalies incl Congenital, Cesarean Section, Heart Murmur, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Too Many Babies Still Placed on Stomach to Sleep: Study

Posted 21 Aug 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Aug. 21, 2017 – Despite years of public health campaigns, many American parents are still putting their babies to sleep in an unsafe position, a new study finds. The study found that just half of mothers surveyed said they always put their babies to sleep on their backs. Experts called the findings "frustrating," since back-sleeping has long been promoted as a key way to cut the risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). In 1994, the U.S. government launched the "Back to Sleep" campaign to encourage parents to put their babies to sleep lying face-up. That came after research identified tummy-sleeping as a major risk factor for SIDS. Researchers believe SIDS is related to problems in the brain regions that control breathing and arousal from sleep. There is no way to tell which infants are vulnerable – so back-sleeping is the safest position for all babies in the first year of ... Read more

Related support groups: Delivery, Premature Labor, Cesarean Section, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Parents of Preemies End Up Just Fine: Study

Posted 11 Aug 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Aug. 11, 2017 – The early life of a very premature baby can be a hectic and stressful time for parents. But once the child is grown, parents are as satisfied with life as those whose babies were born at full term, new European research finds. "Parents of very premature or very low birth-weight children did not differ in quality of life 27 years later compared to parents who had children born healthy and at term," said the study's lead author, Dieter Wolke. "This is a testament to resiliency and coping," added Wolke, a professor of developmental psychology and individual differences at Warwick Medical School in Coventry, England. A very premature baby is one born before 32 weeks' gestation. A very low birth weight is fewer than 3.3 pounds. Being born very prematurely or with a very low birth-weight is linked to a higher risk of death, long-term health problems and higher costs, ... Read more

Related support groups: Delivery, Premature Labor, Cesarean Section, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

How Preschoolers Begin Learning the Rules of Reading, Spelling

Posted 7 Aug 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Aug. 7, 2017 – New research supports the advice that it's never too early to start reading to a child. Children start to recognize and follow some rules of reading and writing as young as age 3, study findings reveal. The study included 179 U.S. kids aged just over 3 years to about 5.5 years. "Our results show that children begin to learn about the statistics of written language, for example about which letters often appear together and which letters appear together less often, before they learn how letters represent the sounds of a language," said study co-author Rebecca Treiman. She is a professor of child developmental psychology at Washington University in St. Louis. An important part of learning to read and spell is discovering how written letters reflect spoken words, Treiman explained in a university news release. But many people think learning to spell doesn't begin ... Read more

Related support groups: Delivery, Cesarean Section, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Women Who Gain Weight Between Babies at Higher Risk for Diabetes

Posted 1 Aug 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Aug. 1, 2017 – Women who gain weight after having a baby may be more likely to develop diabetes during their next pregnancy, a new study suggests. Women's weight before conception and how much they gain during pregnancy are known risk factors for gestational diabetes, the study authors explained. Gestational diabetes is a form of high blood sugar diagnosed during pregnancy. It can cause complications for both mother and baby. Led by Linn Sorbye of the University of Bergen in Norway, researchers investigated the diabetes risk among women who had been pregnant once or twice before. The study involved about 24,200 women who gave birth between 2006 and 2014. The researchers considered the women's previous history of gestational diabetes and body mass index (BMI) when they got pregnant again. BMI is an estimate of body fat based on weight and height. A BMI of 30 is considered ... Read more

Related support groups: Birth Control, Contraception, Obesity, Diabetes, Type 2, Weight Loss, Insulin Resistance, Delivery, Pre-Diabetes, Diabetes Mellitus, Abnormal Glucose Tolerance, Gestational Diabetes, Cesarean Section, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Can Dirty Diapers Offer Clues to the Infant Brain?

Posted 21 Jul 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, July 21, 2017 – Babies' diapers may hold clues to their brain development, a new study suggests. Researchers analyzed fecal samples from dozens of 1-year-olds and assessed their thinking (cognitive) skills a year later. The results revealed a link between certain types of microbes in the infants' feces and higher levels of brain development at age 2. "The big story here is that we've got one group of kids with a particular community of bacteria that's performing better on these cognitive tests," said Rebecca Knickmeyer. She's an associate professor of psychiatry at the University of North Carolina School of Medicine at Chapel Hill. "Are the bacteria actually 'communicating' with the developing brain? That's something that we are working on now, so we're looking at some signaling pathways that might be involved," Knickmeyer said in a university news release. "Another possibility ... Read more

Related support groups: Delivery, Premature Labor, Diagnosis and Investigation, Cesarean Section, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Good Diet, Exercise While Pregnant Could Cut C-section Risk

Posted 20 Jul 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, July 19, 2017 – Eating a healthy diet and exercising during pregnancy isn't just good for the developing baby. A new analysis of 36 studies including a total of more than 12,500 women suggests these behaviors can also lower a mom-to-be's chances of having a Cesarean-section delivery or developing diabetes while pregnant. Overall, healthy habits reduced the risk of needing a C-section by about 10 percent, said study author Shakila Thangaratinam. She's a professor of maternal and perinatal health at Queen Mary University of London. A healthy lifestyle also reduced a woman's risk of developing diabetes during pregnancy – known as gestational diabetes – by 24 percent, the findings showed. Not surprisingly, healthy habits also trimmed the possibility of excess weight gain during pregnancy. "Based on all the evidence to date, what we found was a healthy diet and moderate ... Read more

Related support groups: Birth Control, Contraception, Emergency Contraception, Postcoital Contraception, Delivery, Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation during Pregnancy/Lactation, Labor Induction, Premature Labor, Labor Pain, Cervical Ripening, Apnea of Prematurity, Cesarean Section, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

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