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Diabetes During Pregnancy Could Pose Harm to Baby

Posted 15 days ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Sept. 13, 2016 – Babies born to women with either diabetes or gestational diabetes – diabetes that arises during pregnancy – are at greater risk for complications at birth, a new study suggests. Those complications can be serious and include low blood sugar, malformations and being born either too large or too small, according to the new Italian study. One obstetrician in the United States wasn't surprised by the findings. "This study validates what we have known for a long time and have stressed to our patients about diabetes," said Dr. Navid Mootabar, chief of obstetrics and gynecology at Northern Westchester Hospital in Mount Kisco, N.Y. "Poorly controlled diabetes can result in poor outcomes during a pregnancy," he said. For the study, a team led by Dr. Basilio Pintuadi, with the Niguarda Ca' Granda Hospital in Milan, analyzed the delivery outcomes of pregnant women with ... Read more

Related support groups: Diabetes, Type 2, Diabetes, Type 1, Insulin Resistance, Delivery, Diabetes Mellitus, Premature Labor, Abnormal Glucose Tolerance, Gestational Diabetes, Cesarean Section, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

What New Moms Need to Know About Pumping Breast Milk

Posted 17 days ago by Drugs.com

SUNDAY, Sept. 11, 2016 – Breast pumps can be a big help to new mothers, but women who use them need to keep safety in mind, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration says. Unless breast pumps are designed for multiple users, renting or sharing them can be dangerous – even with family and friends, the agency warns. "Contaminated breast pumps could cause you and your baby to develop an infection," H. Paige Lewter said in an FDA news release. Lewter is an electrical engineer and device reviewer in the FDA's Obstetrics and Gynecology Devices branch. Even if a used pump looks clean, it may still be unsafe. According to Dr. Michael Cummings, an FDA obstetrician-gynecologist, "Potentially infectious particles may survive in the breast pump and/or its accessories for a surprisingly long time." If you do rent or share a multiple-user pump, you must have your own accessories kit – usually ... Read more

Related support groups: Delivery, Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation during Pregnancy/Lactation, Lactation Suppression, Cesarean Section, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Delivering Twins at 37 Weeks May Help Prevent Stillbirths

Posted 7 Sep 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 7, 2016 – A woman carrying twins should deliver her babies at 37 weeks to reduce the risk of stillbirth and newborn death, new research says. A normal pregnancy usually lasts 40 weeks. The risk of stillbirth (when a fetus dies in the womb) is higher in twin pregnancies, and it's common for doctors to deliver twins early in an attempt to prevent stillbirth. But the best time for such deliveries has been unclear, the study authors said. To find an answer, the international team of researchers reviewed 32 studies that were conducted over the past 10 years and included more than 35,000 twin pregnancies. The researchers compared the risk of stillbirth to the risk of newborn death. Newborn death was defined as death up to 28 days after delivery. The risk of stillbirth starts increasing if a twin pregnancy goes too long. But, the risk of newborn death goes down as the length ... Read more

Related support groups: Delivery, Labor Induction, Premature Labor, Cesarean Section, Labor Pain, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Cesarean Birth Linked to Risk of Obesity in Childhood

Posted 6 Sep 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Sept. 6, 2016 – Infants delivered by cesarean section may face a higher risk of becoming obese, a new study suggests. These babies had a 15 percent higher risk of becoming obese in childhood, compared with those born vaginally. The risk was even more pronounced within families, where children born by cesarean delivery were 64 percent more likely to become obese than their siblings who were born via vaginal delivery, the researchers said. "What makes our findings compelling and different from previous studies addressing this question is that this was also true when we compared siblings who differed in type of delivery – one was born by cesarean and the other by vaginal delivery – and when restricted to women without any known risk factors for having a cesarean, some of whom may have undergone an elective cesarean," said lead researcher Dr. Jorge Chavarro. He is an associate ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Asthma, Respiratory Tract Disease, Cesarean Section

Zika May Persist for Months in Newborns, Study Shows

Posted 26 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 24, 2016 – There's more bad news when it comes to Zika's effect on infants: A case study suggests the virus can live and cause damage in newborns for at least two months after birth. The report, published online Aug. 24 in the New England Journal of Medicine, involves a baby boy born in January to a woman in Sao Paulo, Brazil. Zika is typically transmitted via mosquito bites, but sexual transmission can also occur. The mother developed symptoms of Zika illness – rash, fever, headache, swollen joints – in week 26 of her pregnancy. The doctors suspect she got the infection through sexual contact with the baby's father, who had recently traveled to a Zika-endemic region. Zika is most known for its link to a devastating birth defect called microcephaly, where babies are born with a smaller than normal head and underdeveloped brains. However, the Sao Paulo baby appeared ... Read more

Related support groups: Delivery, Premature Labor, Cesarean Section, Zika Virus Infection, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Breast-Feeding Rates Climb, But Many Moms Quit Early: CDC

Posted 23 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Aug. 23, 2016 – Even though most new moms in the United States begin breast-feeding their babies at birth, many stop sooner than recommended, a new study finds. In 2013, eight out of 10 newborns started out breast-feeding, which shows most mothers want to breast-feed and try to do so, according to the 2016 Breastfeeding Report Card from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. But only about half of infants are still breast-feeding at 6 months of age. And fewer than one-third (30.7 percent) are breast-fed at 12 months, the CDC reports. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends breast-feeding exclusively for the first 6 months of life, followed by breast-feeding along with other foods until at least 12 months of age. After that, the academy says breast-feeding can continue as long as mother and baby wish. There are a number of reasons pediatricians say breast is ... Read more

Related support groups: Birth Control, Contraception, Delivery, Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation during Pregnancy/Lactation, Lactation Suppression, Cesarean Section, Lactation Augmentation, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Zika Linked to Deformed Limbs in Newborns

Posted 10 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Aug. 9, 2016 – The Zika virus has already been linked to serious birth defects in the brain, and now it looks as if the virus may also cause deformities of joints in the arms and legs of newborns, a new Brazilian study suggests. The condition – called arthrogryposis – causes multiple joints to be contracted or curved. This condition hadn't previously been linked to Zika, although two previous reports suggested there might be an association with the virus, researchers said. The study authors still can't say for sure that Zika caused the arthrogryposis. But all of the babies had the pattern of abnormalities on their brain scans that would be expected with a congenital Zika syndrome, said lead researcher Dr. Vanessa van der Linden. She's with the Association for Assistance of Disabled Children in Recife, Brazil. The researchers don't know exactly how Zika might cause these ... Read more

Related support groups: Birth Control, Contraception, Sexually Transmitted Diseases, Delivery, Hydrocephalus, Insect Bites, Brain Anomalies incl Congenital, Cesarean Section, Zika Virus Infection, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

What Mom-to-Be Eats Determines Bugs in Baby's Gut: Study

Posted 9 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Aug. 9, 2016 – The amount of fat in a pregnant woman's diet may influence the mix of microbes in her baby's gut, a new study suggests. The community of gut microbes – known as the microbiome – can affect the development of a baby's immune system and the ability to extract energy from food, the researchers said. The study included more than 150 women who provided a record of their eating habits during pregnancy. The amount of fat in their diets ranged from 14 percent to 55 percent, with an average of 33 percent. The U.S. Institute of Medicine recommends 20 percent to 35 percent. The gut microbiomes of babies born to mothers who ate a high-fat diet during pregnancy were different from those of babies whose mothers who did not. Specifically, babies whose mothers ate a high-fat diet had fewer Bacteroides microbes in their guts, both at birth and several weeks after. Having fewer ... Read more

Related support groups: Birth Control, Contraception, Obesity, Delivery, Acidophilus, Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation during Pregnancy/Lactation, Labor Induction, Premature Labor, Florastor, Lactobacillus Acidophilus, Lactinex, Flora-Q, Floranex, Cesarean Section, VSL#3, Florajen3, Flora-Q 2, Saccharomyces Boulardii Lyo, Bio-K+, Florajen

U.S. Maternal Death Rate Is Rising

Posted 8 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Aug. 8, 2016 – The number of U.S. women who die during or soon after pregnancy may be higher than previously thought – and it's on the rise, according to a new study. Between 2000 and 2014, the nation's maternal death rate rose by almost 27 percent, researchers found. However, over that time, reporting methods changed, the study authors noted. For every 100,000 live births, nearly 24 women died during, or within 42 days after pregnancy in 2014. That was up from nearly 19 per 100,000 in 2000. The numbers, published online Aug. 8 in Obstetrics & Gynecology, are worse than previous estimates. Federal health officials have already reported a spike in the nation's maternal mortality figures, but they estimated a rate of 16 per 100,000 as recently as 2010. The new findings give a clearer picture of where the United States really stands, according to lead researcher Marian MacDorman, ... Read more

Related support groups: Bleeding Disorder, Abnormal Uterine Bleeding, Delivery, Premature Labor, Labor Induction, Postpartum Bleeding, Labor Pain, Cesarean Section, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Half of U.S. Women Weigh Too Much Before Getting Pregnant

Posted 5 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Aug. 5, 2016 – More women are starting their pregnancies heavier than ever before, U.S. health officials report. In fact, in 2014, more than 50 percent of women were either overweight or obese at prepregnancy, a new report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found. "This is the first report to focus on prepregnancy body mass index (BMI) and unfortunately, it doesn't look so great," said lead researcher Amy Branum. She's a statistician with the CDC's National Center for Health Statistics. All states, with the exception of Connecticut, New Jersey and Rhode Island, were included in the report, giving the biggest picture to date of what prepregnancy BMI looks like in the nation, she said. Body mass index is a measure of body fat based on height and weight. Increased prepregnancy overweight and obesity contribute to the obesity epidemic in the United States, ... Read more

Related support groups: Birth Control, Contraception, Obesity, Emergency Contraception, Postcoital Contraception, Delivery, Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation during Pregnancy/Lactation, Cesarean Section, Labor Pain, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Newer Treatments Can Make Scars Less Scary

Posted 3 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Aug. 2, 2016 – Scars can alter your appearance and remind you of a difficult time, potentially diminishing your quality of life, a skin specialist says. "While some may consider scarring to be a cosmetic concern, it can really affect patients' psychosocial health," Dr. Joseph Sobanko said in an American Academy of Dermatology news release. "Physical appearance plays a major role in how people relate to others, so scarring that alters physical appearance – even if some would characterize it as minor – can have a negative impact on patients' quality of life," Sobanko explained. He's an assistant professor of dermatology at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia. Sobanko's research found that some people are more bothered than others by scarring. Young people are more bothered than most, he said. People who have scars in highly visible locations such as ... Read more

Related support groups: Sunburn, Burns - External, Keloids, Scrapes, Cesarean Section, Minor Burns, Minor Skin Conditions

Breast-Fed Preemies Do Better on Skills Tests: Study

Posted 3 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Aug. 2, 2016 – Breast milk gives a boost to premature babies' mental and physical development, a new study finds. "Our data support current recommendations for using mother's milk to feed preterm babies during their neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) hospitalization," said study author Dr. Mandy Brown Belfort. She is a researcher and pediatrician from Brigham and Women's Hospital. The study included 180 babies who were born before 30 weeks gestation and followed until age 7. Babies who were mostly fed breast milk during the first 28 days of life did better in IQ, math, working memory and tests of motor skills at age 7 than those who received less breast milk. Belfort said hospitals, employers, friends and relatives need to support new mothers during this time when they are under stress and producing milk for their newborns. "Many mothers of preterm babies have difficulty ... Read more

Related support groups: Delivery, Premature Labor, Cesarean Section, Labor Pain, Apnea of Prematurity, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Babies' Sleep 'Twitching' May Aid Their Development

Posted 2 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Aug. 2, 2016 – When parents watch babies sleep, they often assume that the tiny twitches they see are a response to a dream. But researchers believe that twitching may actually be part of a baby's motor skills development. When a baby's body twitches during rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, it's triggering circuits throughout the brain to teach newborns about their limbs and how to use them, University of Iowa researchers believe. Along with increasing knowledge about early development, learning more about early sensory and motor (sensorimotor) skills development could help improve understanding of certain developmental disorders, such as autism and schizophrenia, the researchers said. "Although often overlooked, there is a substantial problem with the sensorimotor system in these disorders," Mark Blumberg, a professor in the department of psychological and brain sciences, said ... Read more

Related support groups: Delivery, Labor Induction, Premature Labor, Postpartum Bleeding, Diagnosis and Investigation, Cesarean Section, Labor Pain, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Pregnancy Problems More Likely With Baby Boys, Study Suggests

Posted 29 Jul 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, July 29, 2016 – Serious pregnancy complications are more likely when women are carrying baby boys, new research suggests. After analyzing more than half a million births in Australia, researchers said the baby's gender could be linked to the health of both mother and child. "The sex of the baby has a direct association with pregnancy complications," said study first author Dr. Petra Verburg, of the Robinson Research Institute at the University of Adelaide in Australia. Boy babies were more likely to be born early, which sets up infants for more health problems. Also, women carrying boys were slightly more likely to have diabetes during pregnancy (gestational diabetes), and pre-eclampsia, a serious high blood pressure condition, when ready to deliver, the study authors said. Although it isn't totally clear why this is so, "there are likely to be genetic factors," Verburg said. ... Read more

Related support groups: Birth Control, Contraception, Delivery, Premature Labor, Labor Induction, Postpartum Bleeding, Gestational Diabetes, Cervical Ripening, Cesarean Section, Apnea of Prematurity, Labor Pain, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy, Hyperemesis Gravidarum with Metabolic Disturbance, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

If 1st Baby's Early, 2nd Will Be Too: Study

Posted 13 Jul 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, July 12, 2016 – Women who give birth to their first child even a couple of weeks early are up to three times more likely to deliver their next baby prematurely, new research suggests. "The magnitude of the increased risk surprised us – it really is a potent factor," said senior study author Laura Jelliffe-Pawlowski. She is associate director of precision health with the University of California, San Francisco's Preterm Birth Initiative. For the study, researchers analyzed data from more than 160,000 women who gave birth in California between 2005 and 2011. The study authors defined "preterm" as birth at less than 37 weeks' gestation and "early term" birth at 37 to 38 weeks' gestation. Preterm birth is the leading cause of infant death and a major cause of life-long neurological issues, such as cerebral palsy, developmental delays, and vision and hearing loss, according to the ... Read more

Related support groups: Birth Control, Contraception, Emergency Contraception, Postcoital Contraception, Delivery, Premature Labor, Labor Induction, Postpartum Bleeding, Cervical Ripening, Cesarean Section, Labor Pain, Apnea of Prematurity, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy, Hyperemesis Gravidarum with Metabolic Disturbance, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

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