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5 Things You Should Know About Cervical Cancer

Posted 10 days ago by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Dec. 1, 2017 – A little knowledge can go a long way in the fight against cervical cancer. In fact, the more women know about the disease, the greater their chances of being able to prevent it, say cancer experts from the City of Hope, a cancer treatment and research center in California. Death rates from cervical cancer have fallen by more than 50 percent in the past four decades as women have learned more about their risk and as increasing numbers have had Pap tests, which help doctors screen for the disease, the experts noted. However, because this cancer often comes with no early warning signs, City of Hope urges women to protect their health by learning five things about cervical cancer: 1. The most common cause is human papillomavirus (HPV). Roughly 99 percent of cervical cancers are caused by this sexually transmitted infection. The most common strains of the virus, HPV ... Read more

Related support groups: Cervical Cancer, Cervical Dysplasia

Is It Time to Scrap the Pap Test?

Posted 14 days ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Nov. 27, 2017 – If you're a woman who's been given the all-clear after one or more combination tests for cervical cancer, you can probably wait five years between screenings, a new large study suggests. The combination of tests for cervical cancer includes a test to detect the human papillomavirus (HPV) and the test commonly known as the Pap test. HPV is a virus that causes almost all cases of cervical cancers. The Pap test looks for abnormal changes in cells in the cervix that indicate cancer or precancerous changes. Currently, women are advised to have these two tests every five years if they've had negative results in the past, according to the authors of the new study. Or, women can opt to have a Pap test every three years. But "women who've had one or more negative HPV tests are at extremely low risk of cervical cancer or precancer, [and] this paper shows we can safely ... Read more

Related support groups: Human Papilloma Virus, Condylomata Acuminata, Cervical Cancer, Gardasil, Human Papillomavirus Vaccine, Cervical Dysplasia, Human Papillomavirus Prophylaxis, Cervarix, Gardasil 9

HPV Vaccine Linked to Drop in Cases of Rare Childhood Disease

Posted 9 Nov 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Nov. 9, 2017 – The human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, first developed to help guard against cervical cancer, also seems to protect against a rare, chronic childhood respiratory disease, a new study suggests. It's believed that the disease – recurrent respiratory papillomatosis – occurs in children when HPV type 6 or 11 spreads from mother to child around the time of birth. Some children develop wart-like, noncancerous growths in the respiratory tract, making it difficult to breathe. The condition can be life-threatening, and repeated surgeries are usually required to keep the airway clear. In the United States, about 800 children develop recurrent respiratory papillomatosis each year. This results in annual medical costs of $123 million, according to a news release from the Journal of Infectious Diseases, which published the study on Nov. 9. For the study, researchers ... Read more

Related support groups: Human Papilloma Virus, Condylomata Acuminata, Gardasil, Viral Infection, Respiratory Tract Disease, Cervical Dysplasia, Human Papillomavirus Vaccine, Human Papillomavirus Prophylaxis, Cervarix, Vaccination and Prophlaxis, Gardasil 9

Oral Sex Plus Smoking a Cancer Danger for Men

Posted 20 Oct 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Oct. 20, 2017 – Smoking and oral sex may be a deadly combo that raises a man's risk for head and neck cancer, a new study suggests. The key factor is transmission of oral strains of the cancer-linked human papillomavirus (HPV), which can be passed through oral sex. In fact, men who smoke and have five or more partners with whom they've had oral sex – in this study, that typically meant cunnilingus – have the highest risk of developing a type of head and neck cancer known as oropharyngeal cancer. Dr. Otis Brawley is chief medical officer at the American Cancer Society. Reviewing the new study, he noted that "the incidence of oral HPV infection seems to be rising among white men in their 50s and 60s," perhaps due to increasing acceptance of oral sex. Still, for most people, the risk of contracting an HPV-linked head-and-neck cancer remains very low, said lead researcher Amber ... Read more

Related support groups: Birth Control, Contraception, Plan B, Depo-Provera, Mirena, Nexplanon, NuvaRing, Provera, Sprintec, Implanon, Ortho Tri-Cyclen, Microgestin Fe 1/20, Tri-Sprintec, Yasmin, Plan B One-Step, Loestrin 24 Fe, Smoking, Ortho Evra, TriNessa, Mononessa

1 in 9 American Men Infected With Oral HPV

Posted 16 Oct 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Oct. 16, 2017 – Eleven million American men are infected with oral human papillomavirus (HPV), which can lead to cancers of the head, neck and throat, a new study reports. That equates to 1 in 9 U.S. males aged 18 to 69. And infection is most likely for those who have had multiple oral sexual partners, are gay or bisexual, or who also have genital HPV infection, a team of U.S. researchers found. The most common cancer caused by the sexually transmitted virus is oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma, a head and neck cancer that's far more common in men than women, according to the study. "The incidence of this cancer has increased 300 percent in the last 20 years," said lead researcher Ashish Deshmukh. He's a research assistant professor at the University of Florida College of Public Health and Health Professions. Deshmukh and colleagues used 2011-2014 data from the U.S. ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Human Papilloma Virus, Condylomata Acuminata, Gardasil, Head and Neck Cancer, Human Papillomavirus Vaccine, Cervical Dysplasia, Human Papillomavirus Prophylaxis, Cervarix, Vaccination and Prophlaxis, Gardasil 9

HPV Test Alone OK for Cervical Cancer Screening Over 30: Expert Panel

Posted 12 Sep 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Sept. 12, 2017 – An influential U.S. panel of health experts is boosting support for the HPV test as a routine part of cervical cancer screening. The independent U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) – which issues closely heeded guidelines on a range of medical issues – says the test for the human papillomavirus (HPV) can be used once every five years for women aged 30 to 65, in lieu of the once every three-year Pap test. Prior guidelines had called for the use of both tests together. For younger women, aged 21 to 29, a Pap test once every three years is still the recommended screen, the panel said. Certain strains of sexually transmitted HPV are thought to cause the vast majority of cervical cancer cases. "One of the biggest differences between these guidelines and the former guidelines is that the new guidelines recommend against co-testing – HPV test and a Pap ... Read more

Related support groups: Human Papilloma Virus, Condylomata Acuminata, Cervical Cancer, Gardasil, Cervical Dysplasia, Diagnosis and Investigation, Human Papillomavirus Vaccine, Human Papillomavirus Prophylaxis, Cervarix, Gardasil 9

Health Tip: Getting the HPV Vaccine

Posted 30 Aug 2017 by Drugs.com

-- Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a sexually transmitted disease that has been linked to cancer of the cervix and a host of other cancers. The HPV vaccine is designed to prevent infection by the HPV-16 and HPV-18 strains of the virus, which are responsible for about 70 percent of cervical cancers, the American Cancer Society says. The virus also can lead to cancers of the anus, penis, vagina and throat. Here are the society's suggestions for who should get the vaccine, and when: The shot is best given when a person is age 11 or 12 because it produces the strongest immune response at this age. The vaccine also is recommended for unvaccinated females aged 13 to 26, and for unvaccinated males 13 to 21. Males 22 to 26 may also be vaccinated, but the shot is not as effective at these older ages. The vaccine is not approved nor recommended after age 26. While the shot is safe, it won't offer ... Read more

Related support groups: Sexually Transmitted Diseases, Human Papilloma Virus, Condylomata Acuminata, Gardasil, Cervical Dysplasia, Human Papillomavirus Vaccine, Human Papillomavirus Prophylaxis, Cervarix, Gardasil 9

Cancer Deaths Higher in Rural America, CDC Reports

Posted 6 Jul 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, July 6, 2017 – Cancer death rates are declining overall in the United States, but they are higher and falling more slowly in rural America, a new federal government report shows. "While geography alone can't predict your risk of cancer, it can impact prevention, diagnosis and treatment opportunities – and that's a significant public health problem in the U.S.," said Dr. Anne Schuchat, acting director of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The report, published July 6, is the first to detail cancer differences and death rates in urban and rural America. Part of the CDC's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, it found: Cancer death rates were higher in rural areas – 180 deaths for every 100,000 people, compared to 158 per 100,000 in urban areas. Cancer death rates fell 1 percent a year in rural America, compared with 1.6 percent in urban areas. Overall ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Sunburn, Human Papilloma Virus, Skin Cancer, Hepatitis B Prevention, Cervical Dysplasia, Prevention of Sunburn, Hepatitis B Prophylaxis, History - Skin Cancer, Vaccination and Prophlaxis

Screening, HPV Vaccine Can Prevent Cervical Cancer: FDA

Posted 8 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Feb. 7, 2017 – Women can reduce their risk of cervical cancer through vaccination and screening, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration says. In 2016, nearly 13,000 women in the United States will be diagnosed with cervical cancer and more than 4,100 will die from the disease, according to the U.S. National Cancer Institute. The FDA wants to make women aware of how to protect themselves from cervical cancer, which is caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV). An FDA-approved vaccine called Gardasil 9 protects against 9 HPV types and can prevent about 90 percent of cervical, vulvar, vaginal and anal cancer cancers, and also protects against genital warts. The vaccine is approved for use in females and males aged 9 to 26. Gardasil 9 is not a treatment for HPV disease or cervical cancer, noted Marion Gruber, director of the FDA's Office of Vaccines Research and Review. "Women, ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Colorectal Cancer, Human Papilloma Virus, Condylomata Acuminata, Cervical Cancer, Gardasil, Cervical Dysplasia, Human Papillomavirus Vaccine, Human Papillomavirus Prophylaxis, Cervarix, Vaccination and Prophlaxis, Urinary Tract Cancer, Gardasil 9

How Is the HPV Vaccine Perceived on Twitter?

Posted 18 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Dec. 16, 2016 – Twitter conversations regarding the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine – which protects against sexually transmitted infections – tend to be positive, researchers say. Despite the vaccine's effectiveness, some oppose its use and voice their opinions on social media. So Drexel University researchers decided to assess what's being said on Twitter about the vaccine for preteens. They found more positive tweets than negative ones. "In our sample, I expected to see a large number of negative tweets based on traditional news coverage of the topic and because HPV can be portrayed as controversial because it brings together the fields of sexually transmitted infections, immunizations and cancer prevention," said study co-author Philip Massey. "But that wasn't the case on Twitter, we found." "It is always encouraging to see that more positive messages about health are ... Read more

Related support groups: Human Papilloma Virus, Condylomata Acuminata, Gardasil, Human Papillomavirus Vaccine, Cervical Dysplasia, Human Papillomavirus Prophylaxis, Cervarix, Vaccination and Prophlaxis, Gardasil 9

Pubic Grooming Tied to Higher STD Rates

Posted 6 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Dec. 5, 2016 – Brazilian bikini waxing and similar forms of personal grooming may be all the rage, but they come with a heightened risk of acquiring a sexually transmitted disease, new research suggests. The study found that frequent groomers of pubic hair are three to four times more likely to contract a sexually transmitted infection, such as herpes, human papillomavirus (HPV) or syphilis. "Grooming is linked to a heightened self-reported sexually transmitted disease risk, and for those who groom frequently or remove all of their hair often, the association is even higher," said lead researcher Dr. Charles Osterberg. He's an assistant professor of urology and surgery at the University of Texas Dell Medical School in Austin. Still, the study didn't prove a direct cause-and-effect relationship between pubic grooming and sexually transmitted infections, it was only designed to ... Read more

Related support groups: Sexually Transmitted Diseases, Cold sores, Herpes Simplex - Suppression, Herpes Simplex, Human Papilloma Virus, Syphilis, Herpes Simplex Labialis, Herpes Simplex, Mucocutaneous/Immunocompetent Host, Cervical Dysplasia, Human Papillomavirus Prophylaxis, Neurosyphilis, Syphilis - Early, Tertiary Syphilis, Syphilis - Latent, Herpes Simplex - Prophylaxis

Two Doses of HPV Vaccine Effective for Younger Teens

Posted 22 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Nov. 22, 2016 – New global research confirms that two doses of the vaccine for HPV, rather than three, can protect younger teens against the sexually transmitted virus. Based on this study and others, U.S. government health officials revised their guidelines last month to recommend a two-dose regimen for teens younger than 15. Prior to that revised guideline, three doses were recommended for adolescents and young adults up through 26 years of age. The vaccine protects against infection by HPV (human papillomavirus), which is the cause of 90 percent of cervical cancers, according to the U.S. National Cancer Institute. The new review included more than 1,500 young people, aged 9 to 26, who were vaccinated against HPV at 52 sites in 15 countries. For the study, the researchers gave two doses of HPV vaccine to teens aged 9 to 14, and three doses of the vaccine to older teens and ... Read more

Related support groups: Human Papilloma Virus, Condylomata Acuminata, Cervical Cancer, Gardasil, Cervical Dysplasia, Human Papillomavirus Vaccine, Human Papillomavirus Prophylaxis, Cervarix, Vaccination and Prophlaxis, Gardasil 9

Anal Cancer Rates Rising in Many Parts of the World

Posted 2 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 2, 2016 – Anal cancer rates are on the rise in many countries. But vaccination against human papillomavirus (HPV) – a virus linked to the development of anal cancer – may help curb rates of the disease, a new study suggests. Researchers looked at data from the International Agency for Research on Cancer. The data included 18 countries. The investigators found that anal cancer rates have been increasing in women and men in 13 of those countries, particularly Australia and other countries in the Americas, and northern and western Europe. In those countries, a major subtype called anal squamous cell carcinoma (ASCC) was much more common than others, and was the main reason for the overall increasing rates of anal cancer. Rates of another major subtype, anal adenocarcinoma (AAC), have been stable or decreasing in most populations, the researchers said. "The reason for the ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Colorectal Cancer, Human Papilloma Virus, Anal Fissure and Fistula, Condylomata Acuminata, Gardasil, Anal Itching, Human Papillomavirus Vaccine, Cervical Dysplasia, Human Papillomavirus Prophylaxis, Cervarix, Gardasil 9

Kids 14 and Younger Only Need 2 HPV Vaccine Shots: CDC

Posted 20 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Oct. 20, 2016 – Children 14 and younger require only two doses of the HPV vaccine rather than the previously recommended three shots, U.S. health officials now say. The vaccine protects against infection with sexually transmitted HPV (human papillomavirus), which can cause cervical and other cancers. On Wednesday, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommended that 11- to 12-year-olds receive two doses of HPV vaccine at least six months apart. It also said teens 13 and 14 can be vaccinated on the two-dose schedule. However, those who start receiving the vaccinations later – at ages 15 to 26 – still need three doses of the vaccine, according to the updated guidelines. One cervical cancer expert called the new guidelines "very important." "Decreasing the number of shots from three to two will definitely increase the chances of compliance [with vaccination]," said ... Read more

Related support groups: Human Papilloma Virus, Condylomata Acuminata, Gardasil, Cervical Dysplasia, Human Papillomavirus Vaccine, Cervarix, Vaccination and Prophlaxis, Gardasil 9

Are Fewer Cervical Cancer Screenings Needed After HPV Vaccine?

Posted 18 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Oct. 17, 2016 – Women who've been vaccinated against human papillomavirus (HPV) likely need fewer cervical cancer screenings, a new study argues. Just how often a woman needs a cervical cancer screening depends on the type of vaccine she had, the researchers said. Women vaccinated with earlier versions of the HPV vaccine – which protect against the two worst cancer-causing strains of the sexually transmitted virus – only need cervical cancer screening every five years starting at age 25 or 30, the study concluded. Women who've received the updated vaccine, which protects against seven cancer-causing strains of HPV, need screening even less often. The researchers recommend testing these women every 10 years starting at age 30 to 35 and ending at age 65. Both screening regimens would be much less rigorous than current guidelines, which call for cervical cancer exams from age 21 ... Read more

Related support groups: Human Papilloma Virus, Condylomata Acuminata, Cervical Cancer, Gardasil, Human Papillomavirus Vaccine, Cervical Dysplasia, Human Papillomavirus Prophylaxis, Cervarix, Gardasil 9

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