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5 Things You Should Know About Cervical Cancer

Posted 1 Dec 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Dec. 1, 2017 – A little knowledge can go a long way in the fight against cervical cancer. In fact, the more women know about the disease, the greater their chances of being able to prevent it, say cancer experts from the City of Hope, a cancer treatment and research center in California. Death rates from cervical cancer have fallen by more than 50 percent in the past four decades as women have learned more about their risk and as increasing numbers have had Pap tests, which help doctors screen for the disease, the experts noted. However, because this cancer often comes with no early warning signs, City of Hope urges women to protect their health by learning five things about cervical cancer: 1. The most common cause is human papillomavirus (HPV). Roughly 99 percent of cervical cancers are caused by this sexually transmitted infection. The most common strains of the virus, HPV ... Read more

Related support groups: Cervical Cancer, Cervical Dysplasia

Is It Time to Scrap the Pap Test?

Posted 28 Nov 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Nov. 27, 2017 – If you're a woman who's been given the all-clear after one or more combination tests for cervical cancer, you can probably wait five years between screenings, a new large study suggests. The combination of tests for cervical cancer includes a test to detect the human papillomavirus (HPV) and the test commonly known as the Pap test. HPV is a virus that causes almost all cases of cervical cancers. The Pap test looks for abnormal changes in cells in the cervix that indicate cancer or precancerous changes. Currently, women are advised to have these two tests every five years if they've had negative results in the past, according to the authors of the new study. Or, women can opt to have a Pap test every three years. But "women who've had one or more negative HPV tests are at extremely low risk of cervical cancer or precancer, [and] this paper shows we can safely ... Read more

Related support groups: Human Papilloma Virus, Condylomata Acuminata, Cervical Cancer, Gardasil, Cervical Dysplasia, Human Papillomavirus Vaccine, Human Papillomavirus Prophylaxis, Cervarix, Gardasil 9

Memo to Doctors: Spit Out the Bad News

Posted 27 Nov 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Nov. 27, 2017 – Doctors, don't be afraid to deliver bad news. Telling cancer patients the truth about their chances of survival does not harm a physician's relationship with those people. It could even make it better, according to a new study. "We hope this information will reassure clinicians about any negative impacts of these discussions on their relationships with patients," said study lead author Joshua Fenton. "Discussing prognosis doesn't undermine trust – and informing patients may have large benefits in terms of future quality of life," added Fenton. He is a professor of family and community medicine at the University of California, Davis. The study included 238 adults with advanced cancer. The patients received bad news about their disease progression from oncologists in New York state and California. Interviews with the patients showed that hearing the poor ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Breast Cancer, Prostate Cancer, Colorectal Cancer, Ovarian Cancer, Cervical Cancer, Breast Cancer - Palliative

1 in 4 U.S. Seniors With Cancer Has Had It Before

Posted 22 Nov 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 22, 2017 – For a quarter of American seniors, a cancer diagnosis signals the return of an old foe, new research shows. Even in cancer patients younger than 65, one in 10 cases involves people who've had the disease before, the study of nearly 741,000 people found. Depending on a patient's age or cancer type, the frequency of prior cancers ranged anywhere from about 4 percent to 37 percent, the researchers said, "and most prior cancers were diagnosed in a different cancer site." The trial was led by Caitlin Murphy of the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, and published online Nov. 22 in JAMA Oncology. One oncologist said the findings are a logical consequence of advances in cancer care. "With improvements in medical treatments, including cancer therapeutics, patients are living longer and longer," noted Dr. Marc Smaldone. "Unfortunately, this ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Smoking, Breast Cancer, Smoking Cessation, Alcohol Dependence, Colorectal Cancer, Alcoholism, Cervical Cancer, Acute Alcohol Intoxication

IUD May Lower Cervical Cancer Risk

Posted 7 Nov 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Nov. 7, 2017 – IUD contraceptive devices may reduce a woman's risk of cervical cancer by about a third, a new review concludes. Researchers think IUDs might promote an immune response that kills off human papillomavirus (HPV), the virus that causes virtually all cases of cervical cancer. "The data say the presence of the IUD in the uterus stimulates an immune response, and that immune response very, very substantially destroys sperm and keeps sperm from reaching the egg," explained lead researcher Victoria Cortessis. "It stands to reason the IUD might influence other immune phenomenon." These results could be potentially lifesaving for young adult women who are too old to benefit from the HPV vaccine, said Cortessis. She is an associate professor of clinical preventive medicine at the University of Southern California's Keck School of Medicine. "The vaccines don't work unless ... Read more

Related support groups: Birth Control, Contraception, Plan B, Emergency Contraception, Depo-Provera, Nexplanon, Mirena, NuvaRing, Provera, Sprintec, Implanon, Ortho Tri-Cyclen, Microgestin Fe 1/20, Tri-Sprintec, Yasmin, Plan B One-Step, Loestrin 24 Fe, Ortho Evra, TriNessa, Mononessa

Speed Up the 'Cancer Moonshot,' Doctors Urge

Posted 1 Nov 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Oct. 31, 2017 – The Cancer Moonshot Initiative now has a detailed road map designed to cram a decade's worth of medical advancement into half that time. A new report, authored by more than 50 leading U.S. cancer doctors, highlights 13 priority areas for improving the medical response to cancer, along with measurable goals and a specific timeline for meeting each of those objectives. The plan is intended to help "accelerate existing progress so that we deliver in five years what would have historically taken 10," said Dr. Cliff Hudis, chief executive officer of the American Society of Clinical Oncology and co-author of the report. It was created by The Lancet Oncology Commission on Future Research Priorities in the USA. In late 2016, Congress appropriated $1.8 billion for cancer research funding over the next seven years for the so-called Cancer Moonshot, said commission ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Methotrexate, Breast Cancer, Prostate Cancer, Fluorouracil, Gleevec, Lung Cancer, Colorectal Cancer, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Melanoma, Xeloda, Tasigna, Sprycel, Hydroxyurea, Herceptin, Cervical Cancer, Mercaptopurine, Hydrea, Cisplatin, Carboplatin

Many Cancer Patients Skimp on Treatment Due to Cost

Posted 24 Oct 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Oct. 24, 2017 – The high cost of cancer care in the United States has led more than one-quarter of patients to cut back on some part of their treatment, a new survey reveals. Commissioned by the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), the report found that 27 percent of cancer survivors or close relatives of a cancer patient said they'd skipped doctor visits or taken other steps to reduce health costs. To save money, nearly one in 10 said they had avoided doctor appointments. Eight percent had refused treatment; postponed filling or not filled prescriptions; or skipped doses of prescribed medications. And 7 percent said they had cut pills in half, according to the survey of more than 4,000 adults. Such measures can jeopardize treatment success, ASCO says. "We should all be alarmed that Americans are potentially risking not only their health, but also their lives, due to ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Depo-Provera, Provera, Methotrexate, Breast Cancer, Lupron, Medroxyprogesterone, Tamoxifen, Fluorouracil, Arimidex, Lupron Depot, Femara, Gleevec, Lung Cancer, Colorectal Cancer, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Anastrozole, Votrient, Letrozole, Tarceva

HPV Vaccine Safe for Adult Women: Study

Posted 18 Oct 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 18, 2017 – Vaccines that ward off the cancer-linked human papillomavirus (HPV) are safe for adult women, according to a study of more than 3 million Scandinavians. The researchers, who used Danish and Swedish hospital data to track the incidence of 44 different illnesses over 10 years, found no "serious safety concerns" for women who'd gotten the HPV vaccine to reduce their odds for cervical cancer. The vast majority of cervical cancers are thought to be caused by infection with HPV. Diseases or conditions studied in the new analysis included epilepsy, paralysis, lupus, psoriasis, type 1 diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, thyroid issues and Crohn's disease, among others. The study did find slightly higher odds for celiac disease among vaccinated women, but this was seen only in Denmark. The authors noted that celiac disease is "markedly underdiagnosed" in the Danish ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Cervical Cancer, Gardasil, Human Papillomavirus Vaccine, Human Papillomavirus Prophylaxis, Cervarix, Vaccination and Prophlaxis, Gardasil 9

Need Cancer Screening? Where You Work Matters

Posted 13 Oct 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Oct. 13, 2017 – Waiters, contractors and other employees of America's small businesses are more likely to miss out on cancer screening, mostly because of a lack of insurance, new research shows. "Workers employed at smaller organizations had substantially lower breast, cervical and colorectal cancer screening rates" compared to people working at larger corporations or organizations, American Cancer Society (ACS) researchers reported. And poorer insurance coverage accounted for much of these differences, said the team led by ACS researcher Stacey Fedewa. One breast cancer specialist who reviewed the findings said the issue is an important one, because mammograms, colonoscopies and other screens can save lives – not to mention health care dollars. So it's crucial to "find ways to ensure that workers in smaller companies have access to health care," said Dr. Stephanie Bernik, ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Breast Cancer, Colonoscopy, Colorectal Cancer, Breast Cancer - Adjuvant, Cervical Cancer, Breast Cancer, Prevention

Fewer Uninsured Cancer Patients After Medicaid Expansion

Posted 27 Sep 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 27, 2017 – States that expanded Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act halved the number of uninsured cancer patients, a new U.S. study finds. This matters because "uninsured cancer patients are more likely to go without needed care and treatment, such as radiation therapy or surgery to remove tumors," said study lead author Dr. Fumiko Chino. She is a radiation oncology resident at the Duke University School of Medicine. Chino and her colleagues analyzed the records of more than 197,000 cancer patients ages 18 to 64. All were newly diagnosed with cancer between 2011 and 2014 and received radiation as part of their treatment. The percentage of uninsured patients fell 52 percent on average in states that expanded Medicaid, while Medicaid enrollment rose from 15 to 18 percent. Medicaid is the publicly funded insurance program for the poor. In states that did not expand ... Read more

Related support groups: Breast Cancer, Prostate Cancer, Lung Cancer, Colorectal Cancer, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Brain Tumor, Skin Cancer, Cervical Cancer, Testicular Cancer, Solid Tumors

Where It's Legal, One-Quarter of Cancer Patients Use Medical Pot

Posted 25 Sep 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Sept. 25, 2017 – If you legalize medical marijuana, a sizable number of cancer patients will sign up, a new Washington state survey suggests. One-quarter of cancer patients in Washington use marijuana, researchers found. But the study also revealed it can be a challenge to get information about the drug from health care providers. "Cancer patients desire but are not receiving information from their cancer doctors about marijuana use during their treatment, so many of them are seeking information from alternate nonscientific sources," said study author Dr. Steven Pergam of Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle. Marijuana is reported to ease symptoms related to cancer treatment, and U.S. cancer patients will have greater access to medical pot as acceptance and availability of marijuana increases nationwide, Pergam's team said. Currently, recreational marijuana is ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Breast Cancer, Prostate Cancer, Lung Cancer, Colorectal Cancer, Cannabis, Cervical Cancer

FDA Approves Mvasi (bevacizumab-awwb), a Biosimilar to Avastin

Posted 17 Sep 2017 by Drugs.com

September 14, 2017 – The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Mvasi (bevacizumab-awwb) as a biosimilar to Avastin (bevacizumab) for the treatment of multiple types of cancer. Mvasi is the first biosimilar approved in the U.S. for the treatment of cancer. “Bringing new biosimilars to patients, especially for diseases where the cost of existing treatments can be high, is an important way to help spur competition that can lower healthcare costs and increase access to important therapies,” said FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb, M.D. “We’ll continue to work hard to ensure that biosimilar medications are brought to the market quickly, through a process that makes certain that these new medicines meet the FDA’s rigorous gold standard for safety and effectiveness.” Mvasi is approved for the treatment of adult patients with certain colorectal, lung, brain, kidney and cervical cancers ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Lung Cancer, Renal Cell Carcinoma, Colorectal Cancer, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Avastin, Cervical Cancer, Glioblastoma Multiforme, Bevacizumab, Mvasi

Mvasi Is First Biosimilar Drug Approved for Cancer

Posted 14 Sep 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Sept. 14, 2017 – The first biosimilar drug to treat cancer has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Mvasi (bevacizumab-awwb) was found to be biosimilar to the anti-cancer drug Avastin, the FDA said Thursday in a news release. Avastin was approved in 2004. Biosimilar drugs are typically derived from living organisms and are approved after manufacturers demonstrate that the medications are "highly similar" to already approved drugs, the agency said. Mvasi is approved to treat certain cancers of the colon, lung, brain, kidney and cervix, the FDA said. "Bringing new biosimilars to patients, especially for diseases where the cost of existing treatments can be high, is an important way to help spur competition that can lower healthcare costs and increase access to important therapies," said FDA Commissioner Dr. Scott Gottlieb. He pledged new biosimilar drugs ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Lung Cancer, Colorectal Cancer, Avastin, Cervical Cancer, Bevacizumab, Mvasi

FDA OKs First 'Biosimilar' Drug to Fight Cancer, Mvasi

Posted 14 Sep 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Sept. 14, 2017 – The first approval of a biosimilar drug to treat cancer was announced Thursday by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Mvasi (bevacizumab-awwb) was approved as a biosimilar to Avastin (bevacizumab) for the treatment of adults with certain colon, lung, brain, kidney and cervical cancers. A biosimilar is a biological product that is approved because it is highly similar to an already-approved biologic drug and has no significant differences in safety and effectiveness from the first product, the FDA explained. "Bringing new biosimilars to patients, especially for diseases where the cost of existing treatments can be high, is an important way to help spur competition that can lower health care costs and increase access to important therapies," FDA Commissioner Dr. Scott Gottlieb said in an agency news release. Mvasi is marketed by Amgen, Inc., headquartered in ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Renal Cell Carcinoma, Lung Cancer, Colorectal Cancer, Brain Tumor, Avastin, Cervical Cancer, Bevacizumab, Mvasi

HPV Test Alone OK for Cervical Cancer Screening Over 30: Expert Panel

Posted 12 Sep 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Sept. 12, 2017 – An influential U.S. panel of health experts is boosting support for the HPV test as a routine part of cervical cancer screening. The independent U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) – which issues closely heeded guidelines on a range of medical issues – says the test for the human papillomavirus (HPV) can be used once every five years for women aged 30 to 65, in lieu of the once every three-year Pap test. Prior guidelines had called for the use of both tests together. For younger women, aged 21 to 29, a Pap test once every three years is still the recommended screen, the panel said. Certain strains of sexually transmitted HPV are thought to cause the vast majority of cervical cancer cases. "One of the biggest differences between these guidelines and the former guidelines is that the new guidelines recommend against co-testing – HPV test and a Pap ... Read more

Related support groups: Human Papilloma Virus, Condylomata Acuminata, Cervical Cancer, Gardasil, Cervical Dysplasia, Diagnosis and Investigation, Human Papillomavirus Vaccine, Human Papillomavirus Prophylaxis, Cervarix, Gardasil 9

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