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Try Home Remedies for Child's Cough or Cold

Posted 6 Jan 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Jan. 5, 2016 – Instead of turning to over-the-counter cough and cold remedies, parents should consider treating their children with home remedies, says a leading group of U.S. pediatricians. Like all medications, even cold and could remedies available without a prescription can cause serious side effects in young children, the American Academy of Pediatrics cautions. Because of the risks, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in 2008 recommended that children younger than 4 years old never be treated with over-the-counter cough and cold medicines. Children between 4 and 6 years old should only take these remedies under the direction of their doctor, the academy said in a news release. But children older than 6 can safely take over-the-counter drugs if the dosage instructions on the package are followed correctly. There are safer, more convenient and less costly ways to provide ... Read more

Related support groups: Hydrocodone, Cough, Codeine, Influenza, Cold Symptoms, NyQuil, Dry Cough, Mucinex DM, Dextromethorphan, Benzonatate, Sore Throat, Alka-Seltzer, DayQuil, Cough and Nasal Congestion, Delsym, Daytime, Bromfed DM, C-Phen DM, Tylenol Cold, Tessalon

Health Tip: Dealing With a Bee Sting

Posted 26 Jun 2015 by Drugs.com

-- Most bee stings involve less-than-severe allergic reactions that don't require emergency medical care. To treat most bee stings, the Mayo Clinic advises: Use tweezers to remove the stinger from the skin as quickly as you can. The faster it's removed, the less venom is likely to enter the body. Use soap and water to gently cleanse the area. Sooth swelling and pain with a cold compress or ice pack. If the area is swollen, itchy or red, apply calamine lotion. Take an antihistamine containing diphenhydramine or chlorpheniramine if the itching or swelling is uncomfortable. Don't scratch the affected area. Doing so can lead to an infection. Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Benadryl, Hydroxyzine, Zyrtec, Promethazine, Claritin, Allegra, Loratadine, Diphenhydramine, Phenergan, Cetirizine, Vistaril, Cyproheptadine, Atarax, Tylenol PM, Fexofenadine, Periactin, Chlorpheniramine, Xyzal

Avoid Medication Overdoses in Children

Posted 27 Mar 2015 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, March 27, 2015 – Medications for children – even those you can buy over-the-counter – can be dangerous if a child is given too much, one expert says. That's why pharmacist Sheila Goertemoeller, of the Cincinnati Drug and Poison Information Center, wants parents and other caregivers to know how to safely administer these drugs. Before giving medication to children, parents should carefully read the instructions first and use the appropriate measuring device to prevent accidental overdoses, cautioned Goertemoeller. These precautions are especially important if you're giving medicine to a sick child in the middle of the night, Goertemoeller noted. Dosing errors are made by 41 percent of parents, according to research from the American Academy of Pediatrics. Just taking a few minutes to turn on a light and read the directions will help ensure children get the right amount, ... Read more

Related support groups: Percocet, Vicodin, Norco, Lortab, Tylenol, Benadryl, Acetaminophen, Sta-D, Diphenhydramine, Paracetamol, Fioricet, Excedrin, Endocet, Darvocet-N 100, NyQuil, Dry Cough, Tylenol PM, Acetaminophen/Hydrocodone, Mucinex DM, Phenylephrine

Medication Errors Occur Every 8 Minutes in U.S. Children

Posted 20 Oct 2014 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Oct. 20, 2014 – A child receives the wrong medication or the wrong dosage every eight minutes in the United States, according to a recent study. Nearly 700,000 children under 6 years old experienced an out-of-hospital medication error between 2002 and 2012. Out of those episodes, one out of four children was under a year old. As the age of children decreased, the likelihood of an error increased, the study found. Though 94 percent of the mistakes didn't require medical treatment, the errors led to 25 deaths and about 1,900 critical care admissions, according to the study. "Even the most conscientious parents make errors," said lead author Dr. Huiyun Xiang, director of the Center for Pediatric Trauma Research at Nationwide Children's Hospital in Columbus, Ohio. That conscientiousness may even lead to one of the most common errors: Just over a quarter of these mistakes involved a ... Read more

Related support groups: Xanax, Klonopin, Clonazepam, Seroquel, Ativan, Valium, Abilify, Lorazepam, Alprazolam, Azithromycin, Diazepam, Soma, Benadryl, Flexeril, Latuda, Cyclobenzaprine, Baclofen, Zyprexa, Hydroxyzine, Risperdal

Fewer ER Visits for Kids After Cold Medicine Restrictions

Posted 11 Nov 2013 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Nov. 11 – Restrictions placed on cough and cold medicines may be working, with fewer young children ending up in the ER because of bad side effects tied to the drugs, new research shows. The drop in kids' illnesses came about after drug manufacturers voluntarily withdrew cough and cold medications for this age group from the market in 2007, and after drug labeling changes put in place in 2008. The labeling changes advised that the products were not for use in children under 4. "The change [in ER admissions] was associated with those two events," said study author Dr. Lee Hamilton, a medical officer in the division of healthcare quality promotion at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. "We saw that in children under 2 years old, adverse events from cough and cold medicines dropped from one in 25 of all emergency department visits for adverse drug events to about ... Read more

Related support groups: Sta-D, Cold Symptoms, NyQuil, Dry Cough, Phenylephrine, Mucinex DM, Dextromethorphan, Alka-Seltzer, DayQuil, Delsym, Daytime, Bromfed, Bromfed DM, C-Phen DM, Tylenol Cold, Rondec, Tussin DM, Rondec-DM, Promethazine DM, C-Phen DM Drops

Many Parents Give Kids Cold Medicines When They Shouldn't, Survey Finds

Posted 23 Apr 2013 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, April 23 – More than 40 percent of American parents give over-the-counter cough and cold medicines to kids under age 4 even though they're too young for such products, a new survey finds. In young children, these medicines can cause allergic reactions, increased or uneven heart rate, slow and shallow breathing, confusion or hallucinations, drowsiness or sleeplessness, convulsions, nausea and constipation. Since 2008, labels on cough and cold medicines have warned that they should not be given to children under age 4. The use of cough and cold medicines in children in that age group did not differ by parent gender, race/ethnicity or household income, according to the University of Michigan C.S. Mott Children's Hospital National Poll on Children's Health. The survey included 498 parents of children aged 3 and under. Children can get five to 10 colds a year, so parents often turn ... Read more

Related support groups: Cough, Sta-D, Cold Symptoms, NyQuil, Dry Cough, Mucinex DM, Phenylephrine, Dextromethorphan, Alka-Seltzer, DayQuil, Delsym, Daytime, Bromfed, C-Phen DM, Bromfed DM, Tylenol Cold, Rondec, Tussin DM, Actifed, Rondec-DM

Know What's in Your Child's Medications, FDA Warns

Posted 17 Mar 2013 by Drugs.com

SUNDAY, March 17 – It's the time of year when cold season and allergy season overlap, and parents need to know the active ingredients in the medicines they give their children for these conditions, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration warns. Taking more than one medicine at a time could cause serious health problems if the drugs have the same active ingredient, which is the component that makes the medicine effective against a particular condition. For over-the-counter products, active ingredients are listed first on a medicine's Drug Facts label. For prescription medicines, active ingredients are listed in a patient package insert or consumer information sheet provided by the pharmacist, the FDA said. Many medicines have just one active ingredient. But combination medicines – such as those for allergy, cough or fever and congestion – may have more than one. Antihistamine is an ... Read more

Related support groups: Vicodin, Norco, Lortab, Tylenol, Ibuprofen, Benadryl, Acetaminophen, Advil, Zyrtec, Sta-D, Claritin, Allegra, Loratadine, Diphenhydramine, Pseudoephedrine, Paracetamol, Fioricet, Motrin, Excedrin, Cetirizine

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Cough and Nasal Congestion

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