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Cardiovascular Conditions and Disorders News

For Elderly Needing Home Medical Care, Are Nurse Practitioners the Answer?

Posted 15 days ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Feb. 6, 2017 – Nurse practitioners could meet the growing need for house calls to frail, elderly Americans, but restrictions in some states may get in the way, researchers say. An analysis of Medicare data showed that in 2013, nurse practitioners made more than 1 million home visits nationwide, compared with 925,000 visits a year earlier. Doctors made 1 million home visits both years, the new study finds. The total number of home visits made by all types of health care providers increased from 4.9 million in 2012 to 5.2 million in 2013, the researchers found. The findings have "implications for both house-call providers and nursing education," said lead researcher Nengliang Yao. "If we want to take care of our geriatric population, we really need more providers to do so," added Yao, an assistant professor in the University of Virginia Medical School's department of public ... Read more

Related support groups: Osteoarthritis, Osteoporosis, Fracture, bone, Prevention of Osteoporosis, Osteopenia, Compression Fracture of Vertebral Column, Cardiovascular Conditions and Disorders, Prevention of Falls, Prevention of Fractures

Hospitalizations for Common Heart Rhythm Problem on the Rise

Posted 16 days ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Feb. 6, 2017 – U.S. patients with a common heart rhythm disorder called atrial fibrillation (AFib) are ending up in the hospital more often than before, a new study says. The good news is that they're surviving more, too. "The more intensive and costly inpatient care that we're providing for AFib recently is associated with decreasing rates of readmission and both short- and longer-term death rates," study first author Dr. James Freeman said in a Yale University news release. He is an assistant professor of medicine (cardiology) at the school. Freeman noted that use of several newer treatments increased during the study period, including catheter ablation and medications. The use of ablation, which involves burning or freezing specific areas of the heart, rose along with improvements in hospitalizations and death rates. Atrial fibrillation – marked by electrical irregularities ... Read more

Related support groups: Atrial Fibrillation, Heart Disease, Arrhythmia, Prevention of Thromboembolism in Atrial Fibrillation, Cardiovascular Conditions and Disorders, Cardiothoracic Surgery

Snowstorms May Bring Blizzard of Heart Troubles

Posted 31 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Jan. 30, 2017 – Snowstorms may leave more than a big mess in their wake: New research shows a sharp spike in hospital admissions for heart trouble two days after these weather events. Hospital admissions for heart attacks, chest pain and stroke actually fell on the day of the storm, the study found, possibly because people can't get out for care. But they rebounded again within the next 48 hours. The reasons for the trends aren't clear, the researchers said. "We're not talking to people and asking them, 'Why did you go to the hospital on this day and not that day?' " said study lead author Jennifer Bobb. Bobb was a postdoctoral researcher at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health when she worked on the study. She's now an assistant investigator at the Group Health Research Institute in Seattle. With emergency travel bans in place during major snowstorms, "maybe people ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Heart Failure, Congestive Heart Failure, Left Ventricular Dysfunction, Ischemic Heart Disease, Cardiovascular Conditions and Disorders, Hypertensive Heart Disease, Prevention of Falls

More Than Half of Americans Have Chronic Health Problem: Study

Posted 3 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 2, 2016 – More than half of Americans have at least one chronic disease, mental illness or problem with drugs or alcohol, according to a new study. "The health of individuals in the U.S.A. is increasingly being defined by complexity and multimorbidity, the co-occurrence of two or more chronic medical conditions," said the study authors, Elizabeth Lee Reisinger Walker and Dr. Benjamin Druss. They emphasized that people with multiple health issues need more access to care and better coordination among their health care providers. The Emory University researchers examined public health records to find out what percentage of U.S. adults have chronic medical conditions, mental illness or substance abuse problems, and how many were also living in poverty. Chronic medical conditions looked at in the study included asthma, cirrhosis, diabetes, heart disease, hepatitis, high ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Bipolar Disorder, High Blood Pressure, Hypertension, Smoking, Heart Disease, Schizophrenia, Smoking Cessation, Alcohol Dependence, Angina, Psychosis, Psychiatric Disorders, Substance Abuse, Alcoholism, Hangover, Ischemic Heart Disease, Drug Psychosis, Cardiovascular Conditions and Disorders, Hypertensive Heart Disease, Acute Alcohol Intoxication

Are Vegetarian Diets Heart-Healthier?

Posted 18 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Oct. 18, 2016 – Vegetarians are assumed to be healthier than carnivores, but a new study questions that assumption. It found meat eaters had no significantly greater risk of heart disease over 10 years compared to those who favored no-meat diets. "I wouldn't say a vegetarian diet is useless for preventing cardiovascular risk," said study leader Dr. Hyunseok Kim. However, the heart benefits on a population level may be less than some believe, said Kim, an internal medicine resident at Rutgers New Jersey School of Medicine in Newark. The study findings puzzleded one nutritionist who said previous research has indicated that a vegetarian diet is good for the heart. The study used U.S. national survey data to compare adult vegetarians to thousands of meat eaters. While vegetarians were thinner, their overall heart risk wasn't actually different, according to the study. "Followers ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Dietary Supplementation, Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation and Deficiency, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Cardiovascular Conditions and Disorders, Ischemic Heart Disease

Nearly 1 in 4 U.S. Seniors Has Some Form of Disability

Posted 3 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 3, 2016 – A new U.S. government report on aging finds that close to a quarter of Americans over 65 have some form of disability. "Many Americans enjoy longer lives, though with some functional limitations," according to a news release from the Federal Interagency Forum on Aging-Related Statistics, which authored the report. The Forum found that in 2014, "22 percent of the population age 65 and over say they have at least one limitation in vision, hearing, mobility, communication, cognition, or self-care." That finding means millions of Americans – often spouses or children – are becoming caregivers for disabled, aging loved ones. The report found that, in most cases, the burden isn't excessive. Overall, "about 86 percent reported that informal caregiving gives them satisfaction that the care recipient is well cared for," the Forum said. Caregivers often reported a ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety and Stress, Cancer, Cardiovascular Conditions and Disorders

Are Omega-3s Linked to Lower Risk for Fatal Heart Attack?

Posted 27 Jun 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, June 27, 2016 – Regularly eating fish and other foods rich in omega-3 fatty acids may lower your risk of fatal heart disease, a new research review suggests. "Our results lend support to the importance of fish and omega-3 consumption as part of a healthy diet," said senior study author Dr. Dariush Mozaffarian, dean of the Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy at Tufts University, in Boston. "At a time when some but not other trials of fish oil supplementation have shown benefits, there is uncertainty about cardiovascular effects of omega-3s," Mozaffarian said in a university news release. Fish are the main dietary sources of omega-3 fatty acids. Fatty fish, such as salmon, trout, anchovies, sardines and herring, are the richest source of these nutrients. Walnuts, flaxseed oil, canola oil and some other seeds and nuts contain the plant-based omega-3 known as ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Heart Attack, Fish Oil, Lovaza, Myocardial Infarction, Coronary Artery Disease (CAD), Omega-3, Cardiovascular Conditions and Disorders, Omacor, Ischemic Heart Disease, Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids, MaxEPA, Marine Lipid Concentrate, EPA Fish Oil, Hypertensive Heart Disease, Omega 3-6-9 Complex, Animi-3, Restora, Prenatal DHA, Super-EPA

Building Muscle Could Boost the Body's Most Important Muscle

Posted 29 Apr 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, April 28, 2016 – Having more muscle and less fat reduces the risk of early death in people with heart disease, a new study suggests. Doctors should encourage patients to do resistance exercises as part of a healthy lifestyle, rather than emphasizing and monitoring weight loss, the study authors advised. For the study, Dr. Preethi Srikanthan of the University of California, Los Angeles, and colleagues analyzed data gathered from more than 6,400 Americans with heart disease. The investigators found that people with higher amounts of muscle and lower levels of body fat were less likely to die of heart problems or any other causes than those in three other groups based on body composition. The groups were: low muscle/high fat; low muscle/low fat; or high muscle/high fat. Because people with more muscle were more likely to have a high body mass index (BMI, a measurement based on ... Read more

Related support groups: Muscle Pain, Heart Disease, Coronary Artery Disease (CAD), Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Cardiovascular Conditions and Disorders, Ischemic Heart Disease, Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis

Health Tip: Exercise for a Healthier Heart

Posted 11 Apr 2016 by Drugs.com

-- It's common knowledge that exercise helps you shed pounds. But it also can help your heart. The National Heart Lung and Blood Institute says exercise: Boosts lung function and makes your heart stronger, allowing more oxygen-rich blood to be pumped throughout your body. Reduces the risk of plaque formation inside your arteries, which can lead to coronary heart disease and heart attack. Lowers blood pressure and blood fats, and helps regulate blood sugar. Helps reduce inflammation, control weight and boost healthy HDL cholesterol. Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Cardiovascular Conditions and Disorders

Fruit Every Day Might Help Your Heart, Researchers Say

Posted 6 Apr 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, April 6, 2016 – Eating fresh fruit regularly may help prevent heart attacks and strokes, a large study out of China suggests. Adults who ate fresh fruit, such as apples and oranges, every day had about a one-third reduced risk of dying from a heart attack or stroke, compared to those who rarely or never ate fruit, researchers found. "Fruit consumption is important for your cardiovascular health," said lead researcher Dr. Liming Li, vice president of the Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, in Beijing. Study participants who ate fruit most often had lower blood pressure and blood sugar than less frequent fruit eaters, which may account for the reduced risk for heart attacks and strokes, Li said. Due to the nature of the study, however, it could not prove that fruit consumption caused the lower risk of heart attack and stroke, just that there was an association, Li said. For ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Ischemic Stroke, Heart Attack, Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation and Deficiency, Transient Ischemic Attack, Myocardial Infarction, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Ischemic Stroke - Prophylaxis, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Cardiovascular Conditions and Disorders, Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis, Post MI Syndrome

Women Twice as Likely to Die From Severe Heart Attack, Study Finds

Posted 6 Apr 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, April 6, 2016 – Women are up to twice as likely as men to die from the most dangerous type of heart attack, a worldwide study finds. Although death rates have fallen, there are still significant survival differences after what's called ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), according to the Yale University-led team of investigators. The study "highlights that there is a gender discrepancy between men and women in mortality outcomes with STEMI," study first author Hyon Jae Lee said in a Yale news release. The researchers analyzed data from more than 700,000 STEMI patients in 29 countries and six geographic regions. In all those regions, they found that appropriate treatment was delayed for women and that the in-hospital death rate for women was double that of men. Also, women were 70 percent more likely to die at 30 days, six months and one year after the heart ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Attack, Myocardial Infarction, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Cardiovascular Conditions and Disorders, Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis, Post MI Syndrome

Hispanics More Likely to Have Heart Pumping Problems, Study Says

Posted 5 Apr 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, April 5, 2016 – Hispanics have higher rates of heart pumping problems than other Americans, yet many don't know they have a disorder that can lead to heart failure, a new study finds. The research included more than 1,800 Hispanic people. They were between 45 and 74 years old. They lived in New York City, Chicago, Miami and San Diego. About half had a blood pumping problem (called cardiac dysfunction), the study found. But, fewer than 1 in 20 knew they had the heart problem, the study revealed. The study was published April 5 in the journal Circulation: Heart Failure. "The perception has been that Hispanics/Latinos are a low-risk group for cardiac dysfunction, but that is not true," senior study author Dr. Carlos Rodriguez said in a journal news release. He's an associate professor of medicine and epidemiology at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center in Winston-Salem, N.C. A ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Heart Failure, Congestive Heart Failure, Left Ventricular Dysfunction, Ischemic Heart Disease, Cardiovascular Conditions and Disorders

Treating Depression Might Help Stem Heart Woes: Study

Posted 4 Apr 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, April 4, 2016 – Effective treatment of depression seems to reduce a person's risk of heart disease, according to a new study. Depression is a known risk factor for heart disease, but how treatment for depression affected that risk was unclear, researchers said. This study of 7,550 people found that effective treatment for depression could lower a patient's heart risks to the same level as those who never had depression, reducing their chances of stroke, heart attack, heart failure and death. The risk of major heart problems was: 4.6 percent among those successfully treated for depression: 4.8 percent among those without depression; 6 percent among those with depression who did not respond to treatment; and 6.4 percent among those who developed depression during the study. The findings from the researchers at the Intermountain Medical Center Heart Institute in Salt Lake City ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Major Depressive Disorder, Dysthymia, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Cardiovascular Conditions and Disorders

Waistline May Predict Heart Disease Better Than Weight

Posted 4 Apr 2016 by Drugs.com

SATURDAY, April 2, 2016 – When it comes to heart health, new research adds to the argument that a pear-shaped body, which is heavy in the hips, may be better than an apple-shaped body, which carries more weight around the belly. A study of diabetes patients found that increasing waist size appears to be a stronger predictor of serious heart disease than body weight or body mass index (BMI, the weight-to-height ratio). "We have known that abdominal obesity is more linked to coronary atherosclerosis [plaque buildup in the arteries] than other forms of obesity," said Dr. Brent Muhlestein, a study author and co-director of research at the Intermountain Medical Center Heart Institute in Salt Lake City. "We found that left ventricle heart function got worse with progressive waist circumference. The relation between left ventricle function and waist circumference remained highly significant, ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Cardiovascular Conditions and Disorders

Endometriosis Linked to Heart Disease in Study

Posted 29 Mar 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, March 29, 2016 – Women who have endometriosis, the abnormal growth of uterine tissue outside the uterus, may face a 60 percent higher risk of developing heart disease than women without the disorder, a new study suggests. The potential risk was especially high for women who were 40 or younger: they were three times more likely to have heart disease than women in the same age range without the gynecological condition, the researchers found. That finding could be partly explained by the endometriosis treatments themselves. These treatments, such as removal of the uterus and ovaries, have been linked in other studies to potential heart disease risk, the study authors said. "Women with endometriosis should be thinking about lifestyle changes and discussion with their doctor about steps they can take to prevent heart disease," said Stacey Missmer, the study's senior author. Missmer ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Heart Attack, Endometriosis, Angina, Myocardial Infarction, Coronary Artery Disease (CAD), Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Ischemic Heart Disease, Cardiovascular Conditions and Disorders, Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis

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