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Wrongly Focusing On The Airway Can Cost Athletes' Lives in Cardiac Arrest

Posted 6 days ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Sept. 19, 2017 – Athletes are dying from cardiac arrests that occur during play because teammates, coaches and other bystanders don't know how to best save their lives, a new study claims. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) applied immediately can give these athletes a fighting chance, but onlookers failed to provide CPR in three out of five cases, according to a review of more than two dozen game videos. Bystanders instead most often tried to keep the athlete from swallowing his or her tongue, acting on the widespread misconception that this must be done to prevent a person in cardiac arrest from asphyxiating, said lead researcher Dana Viskin. She is with the Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center and Sackler School of Medicine at Tel Aviv University in Israel. "Athletes, especially professional athletes, are receiving poor CPR because the first responders – that is, their fellow ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Heart Attack, Arrhythmia, Myocardial Infarction, Ischemic Heart Disease, Cardiac Arrest, Cardiogenic Shock, Asystole, Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis, Post MI Syndrome

Obamacare May Have Slashed Cardiac Arrest Rate in Oregon

Posted 28 Jun 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, June 28, 2017 – A dramatic decrease in often-fatal cardiac arrest has occurred among Oregon residents who gained access to health insurance through the Affordable Care Act, a new study reports. Cardiac arrest cases declined by 17 percent among 45- to 64-year-olds soon after full implementation of the health care legislation in 2014, the researchers reported. This decrease likely occurred because doctors detected warning signs of heart disease and prescribed effective treatments that lowered patients' short-term risk of cardiac arrest, said lead researcher Dr. Eric Stecker. For example, doctors can dramatically reduce cardiac arrest risk by prescribing statins and daily aspirin to people with clogged arteries, said Stecker. He is an associate professor of cardiovascular medicine with Oregon Health & Science University. The observed reduction in cardiac arrest is a "surprising ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Heart Attack, Myocardial Infarction, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Ischemic Heart Disease, Cardiogenic Shock, Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis

Cardiac Arrest? Someday, Drones May Come to Your Rescue

Posted 13 Jun 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, June 13, 2017 – Drones have been proposed for some pretty mundane uses, such as delivering pizzas or packages, but new research suggests the high-flying machines could be used to swoop in and save lives. Swedish researchers think drones can quickly deliver defibrillators to someone whose heart has suddenly stopped beating. "Each minute that passes after a sudden cardiac arrest decreases the chance of survival by approximately 10 percent," explained lead investigator Andreas Claesson. He's a paramedic with the Center for Resuscitation Science at the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm. "In rural areas, a drone carrying an AED [automated external defibrillator] could arrive far ahead – meaning 16 minutes [faster] – of emergency medical services," he said. And that, Claesson said, could "potentially save lives through earlier defibrillation as carried out by bystanders onsite." ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Attack, Arrhythmia, Myocardial Infarction, Heart Block, Cardiogenic Shock, Asystole, Post MI Syndrome

Bystander CPR Helps Save Brain Function After Near-Drowning

Posted 26 May 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, May 26, 2017 – Near-drowning victims are more likely to recover with good brain function if bystanders immediately begin chest compressions rather than wait for emergency personnel to arrive, researchers report. "What we found is that when bystanders begin CPR [cardiopulmonary resuscitation] before emergency personnel arrive, the person has a higher chance of leaving the hospital and leading a life reasonably close to the one they had before the drowning," said study leader Dr. Joshua Tobin. He is an associate professor of clinical anesthesiology at the University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine. Drowning claims about 10 lives a day in the United States, the study authors said in a school news release. The new study included more than 900 cases of people who suffered cardiac arrest after almost drowning. "When we talk about cardiac arrest, there's no doubt that ... Read more

Related support groups: Cardiac Arrhythmia, Cardiovascular Conditions and Disorders, Cardiac Arrest, Cardiogenic Shock

Chances of Successful CPR Dwindle as Seniors Age

Posted 23 May 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, May 23, 2017 – A new study finds that older Americans have little CPR training, and they are less likely to get CPR when they suffer cardiac arrest at home. "The new data affirms the need for targeted training in the older population," said senior study author Dr. Benjamin Abella, an associate professor of emergency medicine at the University of Pennsylvania's Perelman School of Medicine. "There is a striking relationship between age and CPR training and delivery that is really important to better understand," Abella said in a university news release. The researchers estimate that more than 350,000 Americans suffer from cardiac arrest outside the hospital every year, and only a third receive CPR. With cardiac arrest, the heart suddenly stops beating, and speedy resuscitation is critical. The researchers reached some of their conclusions by examining responses to telephone ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Attack, Myocardial Infarction, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis, Cardiogenic Shock, Post MI Syndrome

Bystander CPR Not Only Saves Lives, It Lessens Disability: Study

Posted 4 May 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, May 4, 2017 – When someone goes into cardiac arrest, quick action from bystanders can have a long-lasting impact, researchers say. Not only were the patients more likely to survive, they were also significantly less likely to sustain brain damage or enter a nursing home in the following year, a new study found. It's well known that cardiac arrest victims have a better shot at surviving if witnesses jump into action, said lead researcher Dr. Kristian Kragholm. That means performing chest compressions or, if possible, using an automated external defibrillator (AED) – a layperson-friendly device that can "shock" a stopped heart back into rhythm. The new study findings, Kragholm noted, show those actions have long-term benefits, too. "Our study findings underscore the importance of learning how to recognize cardiac arrest, how to do chest compressions, and how to employ an AED," ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Heart Attack, Myocardial Infarction, Cardiovascular Conditions and Disorders, Cardiac Arrest, Cardiogenic Shock, Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis, Post MI Syndrome

Just 17 U.S. States Require Defibrillators in Some Schools

Posted 27 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, March 27, 2017 – Automated external defibrillators in schools save lives, but only about one-third of U.S. states require the devices in at least some schools, a new study reveals. As of February 2016, researchers found that 33 states had no legislation requiring automatic external defibrillators (AEDs) in schools. The portable devices treat sudden cardiac arrest – the abrupt, unexpected loss of heart function. They deliver a shock meant to restore normal heart rhythm. Defibrillators are easy to use by bystanders, but time is crucial. The chances of survival decrease 10 percent for every minute a shock is not applied, research has shown. "This review should be used to inform the debate about expanding community-access AEDs into schools," said study lead author Dr. Mark Sherrid. Of the 17 states with AED requirements, only one requires them in public and private grade schools ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Attack, Arrhythmia, Myocardial Infarction, Cardiovascular Conditions and Disorders, Cardiac Arrest, Cardiogenic Shock

Body Cooling Little Help to Kids When Heart Stops: Study

Posted 25 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Jan. 24, 2017 – Body cooling offers no advantage over normal temperature control in treating infants and children whose hearts suddenly stop beating, a new study suggests. The study included 329 children, aged 2 days to 18 years, who suffered cardiac arrest in a hospital. Some had their body temperature maintained within normal range, while others had their body temperature lowered below the normal range to try to reduce brain damage. Current guidelines recommend the use of either approach. Both treatments helped control fever and led to similar survival rates and brain function outcomes one year later. "Some hospitals and physicians have routinely used body cooling for all patients who experience cardiac arrest because they believed it might lead to better outcomes," said study author Dr. Frank Moler, a pediatric critical care physician at the University of Michigan's C.S. ... Read more

Related support groups: Fever, Heart Attack, Myocardial Infarction, Cardiogenic Shock, Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis, Post MI Syndrome

Delaying 2nd Shock After Cardiac Arrest Won't Boost Survival: Study

Posted 7 Apr 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, April 7, 2016 – Delaying a second shock to the heart in hospital patients with cardiac arrest doesn't improve their chances of survival, suggests a new study that challenges current recommendations. A patient undergoing cardiac arrest needs to be treated with a defibrillator, which sends an electric shock to the heart to restore normal heart rhythm, according to the U.S. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. Guidelines introduced in 2005 recommend delaying a second shock after the first one to allow time for chest compressions. But evidence to support that advice has been lacking, the study authors said. The authors – led by Dr. Steven Bradley of the VA Eastern Colorado Health Care System in Denver – looked at data on the time between first and second defibrillation attempts. The study included more than 2,700 cardiac arrest patients from 172 U.S. hospitals. About 25 ... Read more

Related support groups: Arrhythmia, Heart Block, Ventricular Fibrillation, AV Heart Block, Cardiogenic Shock

Women in Cardiac Arrest May Be Less Likely to Receive Help

Posted 8 Mar 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, March 8, 2016 – Women are less likely than men to be helped by bystanders if they suffer cardiac arrest, a new study finds. "There is a misconception that women don't have heart problems so they don't get as much help from the public and they are not treated the same by doctors," said study author Dr. Nicole Karam. She is an interventional cardiologist at the European Hospital Georges Pompidou in Paris. Researchers reviewed records of more than 11,400 people who had a cardiac arrest in public areas in and around Paris between 2011 and 2014. Cardiac arrest, the sudden loss of heart function, is often caused by abnormal heart rhythms. It is not the same as a heart attack. Even though bystanders were more likely to be present when women suffered cardiac arrest, researchers found only 60 percent of women received basic life support – such CPR and use of an automated external ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Heart Attack, Arrhythmia, Myocardial Infarction, Heart Block, AV Heart Block, Cardiovascular Conditions and Disorders, Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis, Cardiogenic Shock, Abnormal Electrocardiogram

Many Critically Ill Patients Lack 'Do Not Resuscitate' Orders

Posted 22 Sep 2015 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Sept. 22, 2015 – Most people who've survived a cardiac arrest in the hospital don't have "do not resuscitate" (DNR) orders, even if they have a poor prognosis, a new study reports. Fewer than one in four of all cardiac arrest patients had a DNR order prepared within 12 hours of their cardiac arrest, the study found. The numbers were only somewhat higher in patients with the worst prognosis even though their likelihood of recovery was very poor. A cardiac arrest "is a serious and life-altering event that should prompt adequate and informed decisions about prognosis and goals of care," said study lead author Dr. Timothy Fendler, a cardiology fellow at Saint Luke's Mid America Heart Institute in Kansas City, Mo. "These results imply that there could be better alignment between prognosis and decisions that place the patient's wishes, safety and quality of life at the forefront." ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Heart Attack, Myocardial Infarction, Cardiovascular Conditions and Disorders, Cardiogenic Shock, Asystole

Blacks at Higher Risk of Sudden Cardiac Arrest Than Whites: Study

Posted 20 Jul 2015 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, July 20, 2015 – Black Americans are more likely than whites to experience sudden cardiac arrest, according to a new study. The study also found that sudden cardiac arrest often occurs at an earlier age in blacks than in whites. Sudden cardiac arrest occurs when the electrical system of the heart malfunctions. This causes the heart to beat erratically or to stop beating. As a result, blood isn't pumped throughout the body. "Sudden cardiac arrest is significantly higher in black Americans compared to whites, at least twofold higher," said study researcher Dr. Sumeet Chugh, associate director of the Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute in Los Angeles. Blacks in the United States tend to have sudden cardiac arrest an average of six years earlier than whites, Chugh said. In his study, he found other major differences as well. "Blacks, in addition to being younger, tended to have more ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Heart Attack, Myocardial Infarction, Ischemic Heart Disease, Cardiovascular Conditions and Disorders, Cardiogenic Shock, Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis, Asystole

Age No Bar to Aggressive Rx for Cardiogenic Shock

Posted 16 Feb 2009 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Feb. 16 – Age shouldn't prevent the aggressive treatment of elderly patients with heart attack complicated by cardiogenic shock, Australian researchers report. Cardiogenic shock (CS) occurs when the heart fails to supply enough blood to the body's organs. It is the most common cause of death after heart attack among Americans over the age of 75. There's typically been widespread reluctance to use invasive treatments on elderly heart patients. However, this study found that elderly patients with heart attack complicated by CS who underwent percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) had a one-year survival rate similar to that of younger patients. "Elderly patients who are admitted to the hospital with massive heart attacks may still benefit from emergency coronary artery balloon angioplasty with stenting, despite their advanced age. Although mortality occurs in roughly half of ... Read more

Related support groups: Cardiogenic Shock

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