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Cardiac Arrhythmia News

Related terms: Irregular Heartbeat, Dysrhythmia

Trouble Sleeping Tied to Higher Risk for Irregular Heartbeat

Posted 19 days ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Nov. 14, 2016 – There may be yet another reason to try and get a good night's sleep: New research ties poor sleep to a higher odds for a dangerous irregular heartbeat. The condition in question is called atrial fibrillation, a common heart arrhythmia that is strongly tied to an increased risk for clotting and strokes. Now, two studies suggest that trouble getting your Zzzs may raise the risk for atrial fibrillation. One cardiologist who reviewed the studies said the theory may have merit. While neither study could prove cause-and-effect, changes in a person's physiology by a "disturbed sleep cycle may be the mechanism for development and recurrence of atrial fibrillation," said Dr. Jianqing Li. She's a cardiologist at Winthrop-University Hospital in Mineola, N.Y. In one study, a team led by Dr. Gregory Marcus of the University of California, San Francisco, tracked data from ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Sleep Disorders, Insomnia, Fatigue, Heart Disease, Atrial Fibrillation, Arrhythmia, Transient Ischemic Attack, Prevention of Thromboembolism in Atrial Fibrillation, Cardiac Arrhythmia, Ischemic Stroke - Prophylaxis, Ischemic Heart Disease

Health Tip: What Could Trigger Heart Palpitations?

Posted 8 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

-- Heart palpitations are irregular heartbeats that should be observed by a doctor without delay. The National Heart Lung and Blood Institute says triggers may include: Feeling strong emotions. Engaging in strenuous activity. Taking certain medications, including decongestants or diet pills. Taking illegal drugs or consuming nicotine, caffeine or alcohol. Having certain medical conditions, including anemia or thyroid disease. Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Atrial Fibrillation, Arrhythmia, Tachyarrhythmia, Cardiac Arrhythmia, Ventricular Tachycardia, Atrial Flutter, Bradyarrhythmia, Ventricular Fibrillation, Ventricular Arrhythmia, Atrial Tachycardia

No Link Between Caffeine, Irregular Heartbeat in Heart Failure Patient Study

Posted 17 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Oct. 17, 2016 – Contrary to common belief, coffee doesn't seem to increase the risk of irregular heartbeats in people with heart failure, according to a small Brazilian study. "Our data reassures that most patients with heart disease might drink moderate doses of caffeine-rich beverages with no major risks," said lead researcher Dr. Luis Rohde. He's from the division of cardiology at the Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul in Porto Alegre. Caffeine-rich beverages have long been suspected of causing several heart-related symptoms, such as palpitations or rapid or irregular heartbeats, Rohde said. "Because of this assumption, counseling to reduce or avoid caffeine consumption is still widely recommended in clinical practice by most physicians for patients with any heart disease," he said. But Rohde's team found no link between caffeine and abnormal heartbeats in the short ... Read more

Related support groups: Atrial Fibrillation, Arrhythmia, Heart Failure, Congestive Heart Failure, Caffeine, Tachyarrhythmia, Fioricet, Excedrin, Supraventricular Tachycardia, Alert, Cardiac Arrhythmia, Fiorinal, Atrial Flutter, Excedrin Migraine, Left Ventricular Dysfunction, Cafergot, Bradyarrhythmia, Fiorinal with Codeine, Esgic, Norgesic

People With Implanted Defibrillators at Higher Car Accident Risk

Posted 29 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Aug. 29, 2016 – People who have an implanted cardiac defibrillator (ICD) to control an irregular heartbeat appear to have more car accidents than similarly aged people without such devices, a new Danish study finds. Overall, Danish drivers with ICDs were 51 percent more likely to be involved in a traffic accident over the two-and-a-half years of the study. But the findings aren't necessarily a reason to tighten restrictions on these drivers, since the absolute risk of any one ICD-using driver being involved in an accident remained very low – around 1 percent a year. The issue is a tough one, said study lead author Dr. Jenny Bjerre, a physician at Herlev and Gentofte University Hospital in Copenhagen. "On the one side, as physicians we need to take public road safety into consideration when we assess if these patients are medically fit to drive," she said. "But we also have to ... Read more

Related support groups: Arrhythmia, Tachyarrhythmia, Cardiac Arrhythmia, Ventricular Tachycardia, Bradyarrhythmia, Ventricular Fibrillation, Ventricular Arrhythmia, Atrial Tachycardia, Cardiothoracic Surgery

Too Many Public Defibrillators Out of Reach When Needed

Posted 15 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Aug. 15, 2016 – Automated external defibrillators (AEDs) placed in public spaces can save the lives of people in cardiac arrest. However, a new Canadian study finds too many of the devices are in buildings that aren't always open, so bystanders can't get them when needed. The study, "serves as a vivid reminder that 24/7/365 access to AEDs is as important as their widespread placement," said one specialist who reviewed the findings, Dr. Howard Levite. He directs cardiology at Staten Island University Hospital in New York City. More AEDs in public spaces, along with timely access, is imperative, he said, because "the potential to improve survival in cardiac arrest is an opportunity that cannot be ignored." Cardiac arrest differs from a heart attack, and occurs when the heart abruptly stops beating. According to the American College of Cardiology (ACC), over 400,000 cases of ... Read more

Related support groups: Atrial Fibrillation, Heart Attack, Arrhythmia, Myocardial Infarction, Cardiac Arrhythmia, Ventricular Tachycardia, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Bradyarrhythmia, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Heart Block, Ventricular Arrhythmia, AV Heart Block, Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis, Post MI Syndrome

CPR Help as Near as Your Phone

Posted 4 May 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, May 4, 2016 – A stranger or someone you love suddenly collapses with cardiac arrest, but you don't know CPR. New research shows that help – and CPR instruction – may be just a cellphone call away. This is "a real-world approach that the majority of communities can adopt to help improve survival in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest," said one expert, emergency room physician Dr. Robert Glatter. The new study was led by Dr. Bentley Bobrow of the Arizona Department of Health Services in Phoenix. His team noted that fewer than half of Americans who suffer cardiac arrest in public places receive CPR – cardiopulmonary resuscitation – from bystanders, and survival rates are very low. When cardiac arrest strikes, "time is cardiac muscle," said Glatter, of Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City. "The sooner we can initiate effective chest compressions and defibrillation ... the better ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Attack, Arrhythmia, Tachyarrhythmia, Myocardial Infarction, Cardiac Arrhythmia, Ventricular Tachycardia, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Bradyarrhythmia, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Ventricular Arrhythmia, AV Heart Block, Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis, Asystole, Atrial Tachycardia, Post MI Syndrome

Study Ties Implanted Defibrillators to Long-Term Complications

Posted 3 May 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, May 2, 2016 – Implantable defibrillators – devices that detect and correct an abnormal heart rhythm – are associated with a high risk of long-term complications, a new study suggests. "An [implantable cardioverter-defibrillator] is a highly effective treatment option to reduce the risk of sudden cardiac death," said lead researcher Dr. Isuru Ranasinghe, a senior cardiologist at the University of Adelaide in South Australia. "However, there is a substantial and persistent risk of device-related complications and re-operations in the years after implantation." These complications include device malfunction, infection and inflammation, the study authors said. Ranasinghe said the rate of complications is higher than previously reported. "The continued occurrence of complications long after the initial implantation indicates the need for vigilance and ongoing surveillance of ... Read more

Related support groups: Atrial Fibrillation, Arrhythmia, Tachyarrhythmia, Supraventricular Tachycardia, Cardiac Arrhythmia, Ventricular Tachycardia, Atrial Flutter, Bradyarrhythmia, Ventricular Fibrillation, Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome, Ventricular Arrhythmia, AV Heart Block, Paroxysmal Supraventricular Tachycardia, Atrial Tachycardia, Paroxysmal Junctional Tachycardia

FDA Approves First Wire-Free Pacemaker

Posted 7 Apr 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, April 7, 2016 – The first leadless, wire-free heart pacemaker has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Medtronic's Micra Transcatheter Pacing System works like other pacemakers to regulate heart rate in people with heart rhythm disorders, but does not use wired leads to make the electrical connection between the device and the heart. One expert believes the device's approval is a big win for heart patients. "The leadless pacemaker is a major breakthrough in the field of heart rhythm management and will benefit patients through its ease of insertion and elimination of the lead," said Dr. Nicholas Skipitaris, who directs cardiac electrophysiology at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City. Traditional pacemakers have a wire or "lead" connecting the device to the heart, and inserting the lead entails minor surgery, Skipitaris said. "Through a small incision near ... Read more

Related support groups: Atrial Fibrillation, Arrhythmia, Tachyarrhythmia, Cardiac Arrhythmia, Bradyarrhythmia, Atrial Tachycardia

Death of Loved One May Trigger Heart Rhythm Trouble

Posted 6 Apr 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, April 6, 2016 – Losing your nearest and dearest may break your heart, literally. People are more likely to develop an irregular heartbeat following the death of their spouse or life partner, particularly if they're younger or the loved one died unexpectedly, a new study suggests. Risk of atrial fibrillation – a quivering or irregular heartbeat that can cause stroke and heart disease – was 41 percent higher among people mourning the death of their partner, compared to others who are not grieving, Danish researchers report. The study reinforces earlier research that has suggested a link between heart rhythm problems and emotional turmoil, said Dr. Mark Estes, director of the New England Cardiac Arrhythmia Center at Tufts Medical Center, in Boston. "Many patients describe that their atrial fibrillation gets worse at a time of emotional stress," Estes said. "This really ... Read more

Related support groups: Atrial Fibrillation, Arrhythmia, Tachyarrhythmia, Cardiac Arrhythmia, Ventricular Tachycardia, Atrial Flutter, Bradyarrhythmia, Ventricular Arrhythmia, Atrial Tachycardia

Common Irregular Heartbeat May Hamper Seniors' Walking Ability

Posted 5 Apr 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, April 5, 2016 – Older adults who develop atrial fibrillation, a common heart rhythm irregularity, may be more prone to walking problems – including reduced speed, strength and balance, a new study suggests. The physical decline associated with atrial fibrillation was equivalent to about four years of aging, the researchers said. "Atrial fibrillation is a serious disease that can have an important impact on how older adults experience declining physical performance and function with aging," said lead researcher Dr. Jared Magnani, an assistant professor of medicine at Boston University. These findings don't prove a cause-and-effect link between atrial fibrillation and declining physical performance, only that there's an association, Magnani said. Other factors can contribute to both the risk of atrial fibrillation and declining physical performance. These factors may include ... Read more

Related support groups: Atrial Fibrillation, Arrhythmia, Cardiac Arrhythmia, Atrial Flutter

Wearable 'Defibrillator-in-a-Vest' May Help Some Heart Patients

Posted 29 Mar 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, March 28, 2016 – A vest containing a defibrillator may be an option for some heart patients who can't use an implantable defibrillator – the device that can shock the heart back to a proper rhythm if needed. That's the conclusion of the first science advisory on the devices just issued by the American Heart Association. The advisory, however, cautioned that there are still big gaps in knowledge about the devices and they should only be used as a short-term option for specific patients. "They serve an important niche, but there is relatively limited evidence about their effectiveness and safety," said the advisory's lead author, Dr. Jonathan Piccini, an associate professor of medicine at Duke University Medical Center in Durham, N.C. "We need research and clinical trials to figure out which patient populations they should be applied to and what the relative benefit is," he ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Atrial Fibrillation, Arrhythmia, Tachyarrhythmia, Supraventricular Tachycardia, Cardiac Arrhythmia, Ventricular Tachycardia, Bradyarrhythmia, Ventricular Fibrillation, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Ventricular Arrhythmia, Cardiovascular Conditions and Disorders, Paroxysmal Supraventricular Tachycardia, Atrial Tachycardia, Paroxysmal Junctional Tachycardia

Spare Dying Patients Electric Shocks From Heart Device, Docs Say

Posted 24 Mar 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, March 24, 2016 – Dying patients with an implantable heart defibrillator don't know the device can be turned off so that it doesn't give them painful shocks during their last days of life, researchers report. Implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) are surgically implanted in people with certain heart conditions. They deliver a shock to restore normal heart rhythm when they detect a potentially deadly abnormal rhythm. Doctors are encouraged to inform patients with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator about the benefits of deactivating the device when they are near death. But research shows that up to 31 percent of people with an ICD receive shocks in their final days. Two new studies provide further proof that many doctors aren't following the Heart Rhythm Society and European Society of Cardiology recommendations. A Spanish study of 243 patients with implantable ... Read more

Related support groups: Arrhythmia, Tachyarrhythmia, Supraventricular Tachycardia, Cardiac Arrhythmia, Ventricular Tachycardia, Bradyarrhythmia, Ventricular Fibrillation, Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome, Ventricular Arrhythmia, AV Heart Block, Cardiovascular Conditions and Disorders, Paroxysmal Supraventricular Tachycardia, Atrial Tachycardia, Sinus Node Dysfunction, Premature Atrial Depolarizations, Paroxysmal Junctional Tachycardia, Premature Ventricular Depolarizations

Daily Caffeine Doesn't Seem to Jolt the Heart: Study

Posted 26 Jan 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Jan. 26, 2016 – There may be good news for coffee, tea and chocolate lovers: Regular caffeine consumption may not cause dangerous racing of the heart, a new study finds. The finding challenges current medical thinking, the study authors said. However, the health risks of heavy caffeine consumption requires additional research, the researchers added. "Clinical recommendations advising against the regular consumption of caffeinated products to prevent disturbances of the heart's cardiac rhythm should be reconsidered, as we may unnecessarily be discouraging consumption of items like chocolate, coffee and tea that might actually have cardiovascular benefits," said study senior author Dr. Gregory Marcus. He is director of clinical research in the division of cardiology at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF). "Given our recent work demonstrating that extra heartbeats ... Read more

Related support groups: Atrial Fibrillation, Arrhythmia, Caffeine, Tachyarrhythmia, Fioricet, Excedrin, Supraventricular Tachycardia, Alert, Cardiac Arrhythmia, Ventricular Tachycardia, Fiorinal, Excedrin Migraine, Atrial Flutter, Cafergot, Bradyarrhythmia, Fiorinal with Codeine, Norgesic, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Esgic, Fioricet with Codeine

Slow Heart Rate Doesn't Mean Early Death Risk: Study

Posted 19 Jan 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Jan. 19, 2016 – People with a slow heart rate don't have an increased risk for heart disease, a new study suggests. A typical heart rate for an adult at rest is 60 to 100 beats a minute, but in some people it's below 50 beats a minute, a condition called bradycardia, the researchers said. Because the heart may not be pumping enough blood throughout the body, this slow heart rate can lead to light-headedness, shortness of breath, fainting or chest pain. However, it hasn't been clear whether a slow pulse increases the risk of heart disease, according to the study authors. "For a large majority of people with a heart rate in the 40s or 50s who have no symptoms, the prognosis is very good," corresponding author Dr. Ajay Dharod, instructor in internal medicine at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center in Winston-Salem, N.C., said in a center news release. "Our results should be ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Arrhythmia, Cardiac Arrhythmia, Bradyarrhythmia, AV Heart Block, Ischemic Heart Disease, Abnormal Electrocardiogram

Childhood Cancer Treatment May Raise Adult Heart Disease Risk

Posted 5 Jan 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Jan. 4, 2016 – Children who survive cancer may face a higher risk of heart disease as adults, new research suggests. The lingering effects of the treatments that saved their lives as children may trigger the development of heart abnormalities that might not cause apparent symptoms, the researchers explained. The investigators found that heart disease appears to affect between 3 percent and 24 percent of pediatric cancer survivors by the time they reach their 30s. Those figures rose to between 10 and 37 percent among patients 40 and older, the study found. However, while the study revealed a link between childhood cancer treatment and later heart disease, it didn't prove cause-and-effect. "The prevalence of these cardiac findings might be expected in an older adult population, but not necessarily in this young a population," said study lead author Dr. Daniel Mulrooney. ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Heart Disease, Methotrexate, Fluorouracil, Xeloda, Cardiac Arrhythmia, Cardiomyopathy, Hydroxyurea, Left Ventricular Dysfunction, Mercaptopurine, Hydrea, Carboplatin, Cisplatin, Cytoxan, Temodar, Dacogen, Cyclophosphamide, Bendamustine, Treanda, Oxaliplatin

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