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Campylobacter Gastroenteritis News

Related terms: Bacterial diarrhea, Campylobacter Enteritis, Food poisoning, campylobacter enteritis, Infectious diarrhea, campylobacter enteritis

Warmer Waters May Mean More Toxic Shellfish

Posted 11 days ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Jan. 9, 2017 – Unusually warm ocean temperatures near the U.S. Pacific Northwest have been linked to dangerous levels of a natural toxin in shellfish. But, researchers report they have developed new ways to predict these toxic outbreaks. The toxin, domoic acid, is produced by marine algae, or plant life. It builds up in seafood, posing a potential threat. Consuming the toxin can be harmful to humans, the researchers said. The project was funded by the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). "We describe a completely new method to understanding and predicting toxic outbreaks on a large scale, linking domoic acid concentrations in shellfish to ocean conditions caused by warm water phases of natural climate event cycles," said study author Morgaine McKibben of Oregon State University. Those "climate event cycles" include El Nino and a similar but long-term ... Read more

Related support groups: Gastroenteritis, Poisoning, Infectious Gastroenteritis, Toxic Reactions Incl Drug and Substance Abuse, Salmonella Enteric Fever, Campylobacter Gastroenteritis, Salmonella Gastroenteritis

Health Tip: Enjoying Rare Meat Safely

Posted 15 days ago by Drugs.com

-- If you prefer rare meat to well done, you might be wondering if the rare variety is safe. The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics explains: A food thermometer should be used to make sure rare meat is hot enough to destroy any germs. Avoid using other cues, such as the color of meat, the color of juices or the firmness of meat, to determine if it's sufficiently cooked. Ground lamb, pork, veal or beef should be cooked to at least 160 degrees Fahrenheit at its center. Whole steak needs to be cooked to 145 degrees Fahrenheit at its center. Read more

Related support groups: Gastroenteritis, Infectious Gastroenteritis, Traveler's Diarrhea, Campylobacter Gastroenteritis, Salmonella Gastroenteritis

Heartburn Drugs May Raise Risk of Stomach Infections: Study

Posted 15 days ago by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Jan. 5, 2017 – People who take heartburn drugs such as Prilosec and Nexium may be at increased risk of two potentially serious gut infections, a new study suggests. The study, of nearly 565,000 adults, found those on certain heartburn drugs had higher risks of infection with C. difficile and Campylobacter bacteria. Both bugs cause abdominal pain and diarrhea, but can become more serious – especially C. diff. According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, almost half a million Americans were sickened by the infection in 2011, and 29,000 of them died within a month. The heartburn drugs in question included both proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) – brands like Prilosec, Prevacid and Nexium – and H2 blockers, such as Zantac, Pepcid and Tagamet, the study authors said. All suppress stomach acid production, and the researchers suspect that may make some people more ... Read more

Related support groups: GERD, Omeprazole, Nexium, Prilosec, Zantac, Indigestion, Protonix, Pantoprazole, Ranitidine, Lansoprazole, Dexilant, Prevacid, Pepcid, Aciphex, Famotidine, Duodenitis/Gastritis, Heartburn Relief, Rabeprazole, Esomeprazole, Zegerid

Don't Let Food Poisoning Ruin Your Holiday Celebration

Posted 23 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Dec. 23, 2016 – Party guests always seem to wind up in the host's kitchen, but too many cooks boost the risk of mistakes that could lead to food poisoning, according to the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. The group says it's also important to keep food safety in mind when preparing homemade food gifts and holiday buffets. It offers these tips: Wash hands before, during and after preparing food. It's also important to wash when switching from one task to another. All kitchen surfaces – including appliances, countertops, cutting boards and utensils – should be kept clean throughout the cooking process. Use hot, soapy water. Never cut raw meat, poultry or fish on the same cutting board as foods like fruits and vegetables that don't have to be cooked. Using color-coded cutting boards can make it easier to remember which one to use for each food. Use different utensils for ... Read more

Related support groups: Gastroenteritis, Infectious Gastroenteritis, Traveler's Diarrhea, Campylobacter Gastroenteritis, Salmonella Gastroenteritis, Traveler's Diarrhea Prophylaxis

Health Tip: Using a Food Thermometer

Posted 9 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

-- Using a food thermometer takes the guesswork out of determining whether food is cooked completely and is safe to eat. The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics suggests the right way to use a food thermometer: Select the right type of thermometer for your needs, from pop-up to digital to manual. Make sure you follow product instructions. Use either ice water or freezing water to make sure the thermometer is accurate. Wait the recommended amount of time before you read your thermometer. Make sure you know the safe temperature for the type of food you are cooking. After using, always clean your thermometer with hot, soapy water. Read more

Related support groups: Infectious Gastroenteritis, Traveler's Diarrhea, Campylobacter Gastroenteritis, Salmonella Gastroenteritis

Health Tip: Prep Your Refrigerator for the Holidays

Posted 8 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

-- Your fridge may be overflowing with leftovers from holiday meals. Here are some tips to safely preserve all that food, courtesy of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Set the fridge temperature between 33 and 40 degrees Fahrenheit, and your freezer at 0 degrees Fahrenheit or lower. Make sure you store any meat, eggs, veggies and milk within two hours. Place raw meat on the bottom shelf, away from produce or ready-to-eat food. If any food is left out at room temperature for longer than two hours, throw it away. Place foods being thawed or marinated in the refrigerator. Read more

Related support groups: Gastroenteritis, Traveler's Diarrhea, Campylobacter Gastroenteritis, Salmonella Gastroenteritis

Health Tip: Cooking a Holiday Ham

Posted 6 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

-- If you're cooking a holiday ham, make sure it's properly prepared to prevent foodborne illness. The U.S. Department of Agriculture advises: Set the oven temperature to at least 325 degrees Fahrenheit to reheat a fully cooked, packaged ham. Cook until the internal temperature reaches 140 degrees Fahrenheit. Use a food thermometer to detect the temperature. Heat a smoked packaged ham to an internal temperature of 165 degrees Fahrenheit. Cook a fresh ham to an internal temperature of 140 degrees Fahrenheit. Let sit for three minutes before serving. Read more

Related support groups: Gastroenteritis, Traveler's Diarrhea, Campylobacter Gastroenteritis, Salmonella Gastroenteritis

How to Prepare That Holiday Turkey Safely

Posted 22 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Nov. 22, 2016 – The traditional turkey centerpiece on Thanksgiving tables may come out looking scrumptious, but cooks in the kitchen need to be concerned about preparing the bird safely to prevent the spread of foodborne illness. That's the advice from the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), which offers the following safety precautions based on how your turkey will be prepared: Fresh Turkey A fresh turkey should be refrigerated until it's time to cook it. Be sure to place it in a pan that will catch any leaking juices and prevent the spread of potentially harmful bacteria, the agency advises. The USDA also recommends buying a fresh turkey no more than a day or two ahead of time. Never buy a pre-stuffed fresh turkey, the agency adds. The stuffing in these turkeys may not have been handled properly and may contain harmful germs. Frozen Turkey Turkeys can be safely ... Read more

Related support groups: Gastroenteritis, Infectious Gastroenteritis, Campylobacter Gastroenteritis, Salmonella Gastroenteritis

Food Safety Not Always on Menu of TV Cooking Shows

Posted 11 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Nov. 11, 2016 – Safe food-handling procedures are often lacking on TV cooking shows, a new study finds. Researchers at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, said if TV cooks fail to demonstrate safe practices, it may lead to unhealthy food preparation in viewers' home kitchens. For the study, the researchers looked at the use of utensils and gloves, protection from contamination, and time and temperature control in 39 episodes of 10 popular cooking shows. They also noted whether the shows mentioned food safety. The findings were published in the November-December issue of the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior. "The majority of practices rated were out of compliance or conformance with recommendations in at least 70 percent of episodes, and food safety practices were mentioned in only three episodes," said study lead author Nancy Cohen, a professor of nutrition at ... Read more

Related support groups: Gastroenteritis, Infectious Gastroenteritis, Traveler's Diarrhea, Campylobacter Gastroenteritis

Health Tip: Keeping Foods Separate During Grilling

Posted 26 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

-- It's important to prevent cross-contamination of food while grilling. The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics advises: Make sure your grill is clean before you begin. Remove any leftover food particles. Don't put cooked food back on the same plate that held raw food. Wash with hot soapy water first, or use a different plate. Use separate grilling utensils to turn food once it's cooked, or thoroughly clean utensils after handling raw food. Never use marinade that contained raw meat to baste cooked meat. Read more

Related support groups: Infectious Gastroenteritis, Traveler's Diarrhea, Campylobacter Gastroenteritis, Traveler's Diarrhea Prophylaxis

Health Tip: Shop for the Freshest Fish

Posted 23 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

-- Fish is a healthy addition to your menu, but it's important to keep it fresh. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration advises: Shopping for fish displayed on a thick pack of fresh ice in a case. Making sure there is no fishy, sour or ammonia-like odor. Fish should always smell mild and fresh. Looking at the fish's eyes to make sure they are clear and bulging, that gills are bright red (without slime) and that the flesh is shiny, firm and bounces back when you press it. Avoiding fish with signs of darkening or dryness at the edges. Choosing shrimp and other seafood that shines and has no odor. Read more

Related support groups: Infectious Gastroenteritis, Traveler's Diarrhea, Campylobacter Gastroenteritis

Food, Even Water Can Spoil When the Power Goes Out

Posted 22 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Aug. 22, 2016 – Power outages can be more than an inconvenience. They can cause problems with your food and water that could put your family's health at risk. If the power is out for less than four hours, food in your refrigerator and freezer will be safe to eat, but you should keep the appliance doors closed, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says. If the power is out more than four hours, pack milk and other dairy products, meat, fish, eggs, gravy and spoilable leftovers into a cooler with ice. A freezer that is full will hold food safely for 48 hours, while a half-full freezer will hold food safely for up to 24 hours, the CDC said in a news release. Avoid opening the freezer door. Before you use any food, check its temperature with a food thermometer. Toss out anything with a temperature above 40 degrees Fahrenheit. Power outages also may cause water ... Read more

Related support groups: Infectious Gastroenteritis, Traveler's Diarrhea, Campylobacter Gastroenteritis

Health Tip: Keep Kitchen Surfaces Clean

Posted 28 Jul 2016 by Drugs.com

-- A clean kitchen is a healthy kitchen, so make sure your countertops, cutting boards and other surfaces are clean and bacteria-free. The Foodsafety.gov website recommends: Promptly clean up any spills or messes with a clean paper towel or dish towel. Frequently wash dish towels in the washing machine on the hot cycle. Use hot, soapy water to thoroughly clean cutting boards, countertops and food prep utensils after each use. To sanitize your countertops, use a solution of 1 gallon of water and 1 tablespoon of liquid chlorine bleach without fragrance. Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Infectious Gastroenteritis, Traveler's Diarrhea, Campylobacter Gastroenteritis

Health Tip: The Basics of Food Safety

Posted 20 Jul 2016 by Drugs.com

-- Make sure you've got your facts straight when it comes to food safety. The U.S. Food Safety Administration explains: Foodborne illnesses can be serious, resulting in chronic health problems or, rarely, death. Never thaw meat on a kitchen counter, as bacteria can multiply rapidly at room temperature. It's also important to marinate meat in the refrigerator, never at room temperature. While bleach is good for cleaning the kitchen, there's no benefit to using excessive amounts. Wash all fruit and vegetables with water (never detergent or soap), even if you're going to peel them. Never rinse raw meat, poultry or fish, which could spread contaminated juices. Follow microwaving instructions carefully, including allowing food to stand a few minutes after heating. This gives the food time to finish cooking. Don't rely on smell as a way to tell if food has gone bad. Some harmful bacteria ... Read more

Related support groups: Gastroenteritis, Infectious Gastroenteritis, Traveler's Diarrhea, Campylobacter Gastroenteritis

Health Tip: Be Smart During a Power Outage

Posted 15 Jul 2016 by Drugs.com

-- Power outages can be dangerous if you don't follow safety precautions. The Red Cross suggests: Keep refrigerator and freezer doors closed as much as possible. Food generally will last inside these unpowered appliances for four hours. Unplug electronics and other electrical equipment. This will protect the equipment against electrical surges when power returns. Keep one light plugged in and turned on so you can see when power is restored. Avoid travel, particularly by car, since traffic lights may not be working. If you use a generator, make sure you carefully follow the product's instructions. Never run a generator inside the home. Read more

Related support groups: Infectious Gastroenteritis, Campylobacter Gastroenteritis, Minor Burns, Prevention of Fractures

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