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Calcium Oxalate Calculi with Hyperuricosuria News

Premature Calcium Deposits May Trigger Premature Births: Study

Posted 9 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 9, 2016 – A new potential risk factor for premature birth has been identified. Ten percent of infants are born prematurely (before 37 weeks of pregnancy), and many suffer long-term health problems. Knowing why preterm births occur might help prevent them, researchers said. A team at Nationwide Children's Hospital in Columbus, Ohio, found that calcium deposits in the membrane surrounding the fetus can form early and may cause a mother's water to break too soon. The deposits, early markers of bone, make the membrane less elastic. The same kind of deposits have also been implicated in kidney stones and hardening of the arteries. But the new study did not prove that these early calcium deposits cause premature birth. "We do see calcium deposits in full term births as well, which is probably part of the normal breakdown of the membranes at the appropriate time," study senior ... Read more

Related support groups: Delivery, Labor Induction, Premature Labor, Labor Pain, Apnea of Prematurity, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy, Calcium Oxalate Calculi with Hyperuricosuria, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Health Tip: Help Ward Off Gout

Posted 4 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

-- When your body builds up unhealthy levels of uric acid – a natural byproduct of your body's cells – it may lead to a type of arthritis called gout. The American Academy of Family Physicians says there are things you can do to reduce your risk of a gout attack: Take all medications recommended by your doctor. Discuss with your doctor the risks of taking aspirin, which may interfere with your medications. Take steps to lose excess weight. Make sure any health conditions, such as diabetes, high cholesterol or high blood pressure, are under control. Eat foods that are low in salt and fat. Drink plenty of water and avoid alcohol. Don't eat foods that have a lot of purines, which break down into uric acid. Examples include organ meats such as kidneys and liver; and anchovies, sardines, herring, mackerel and scallops. Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Gout, Gout - Acute, Gouty Arthritis, Gout - Prophylaxis, Calcium Oxalate Calculi with Hyperuricosuria

Kidney Stone? Try a Roller Coaster Ride

Posted 27 Sep 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Sept. 27, 2016 – Anyone who's suffered a kidney stone just wants the urinary obstruction gone. Now, preliminary research suggests relief might even be fun: a roller coaster ride. There's been anecdotal evidence from patients that these amusement park rides can help pass a small stone, explained Dr. David Wartinger, a professor of urology at the Michigan State University College of Osteopathic Medicine, in East Lansing. His team's new research – conducted on the Big Thunder Mountain Railroad and Space Mountain roller coasters at Orlando's Walt Disney World – seems to support that view. In the study, Wartinger's group used 3D printing to create a clear silicone model of a kidney that contained urine, plus three different-sized kidney stones. They placed the kidney model in a backpack and took it on 60 roller coaster rides. "A ride on a moderate-intensity roller coaster could ... Read more

Related support groups: Renal Failure, Chronic Kidney Disease, Renal Osteodystrophy, Hypercalciuria, Calcium Oxalate Calculi with Hyperuricosuria

Gallstones Linked to Higher Heart Disease Risk

Posted 18 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Aug. 18, 2016 – People who've ever suffered gallstones may have a slightly increased risk of developing heart disease down the road, a large new study suggests. In a group of more than one-quarter million U.S. adults, researchers found those with a history of gallstones were 17 percent more likely to develop heart disease over the next few decades. Gallstones and heart disease share some of the same risk factors – such as obesity, type 2 diabetes and unhealthy cholesterol levels. But those risk factors couldn't completely explain away the finding, the researchers said. To cardiologist Dr. Richard Stein, the study makes a "pretty convincing" case that gallstones, themselves, are a risk factor for heart disease. Stein, who wasn't involved in the research, is director of the urban community cardiology program at New York University School of Medicine. He said that people with a ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Heart Failure, Congestive Heart Failure, Gallstones, Left Ventricular Dysfunction, Ischemic Heart Disease, Cholangitis, Cholecystitis, Calcium Oxalate Calculi with Hyperuricosuria, Cholelithiasis w/ Acute Cholecystitis and Obstruction, Cholelithiasis with Obstruction, Gallbladder Obstruction w/o Calculus, Acute Cholecystitis

Diet Supplement May Help Prevent Kidney Stones: Study

Posted 8 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Aug. 8, 2016 – A dietary supplement may hold the power to dissolve a key component of kidney stones, potentially offering a new prevention tool against this painful condition, researchers say. It's too early to be sure if the compound hydroxycitrate will become a preventive treatment for kidney stones, since extensive research in people hasn't begun. Still, it could offer an alternative to potassium citrate, which treats kidney stones but has side effects, the study authors explained. At issue: the calcium oxalate crystals that are the most common component of kidney stones, mineral deposits that form inside the kidneys. They may get stuck in the urinary tract, blocking urination and causing great pain. Kidney stones affect an estimated 12 percent of men and 7 percent of women. High blood pressure, diabetes and obesity can increase the risk. Physicians often urge people who are ... Read more

Related support groups: Dietary Supplementation, Chronic Kidney Disease, Urinary Tract Stones, Calcium Oxalate Calculi with Hyperuricosuria, Renal and Genitourinary Disorders

Steroid May Be Safe, Effective Gout Treatment, Study Finds

Posted 23 Feb 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Feb. 22, 2016 – A steroid pill may be as good as a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) for treating painful gout, new research suggests. Researchers who compared the steroid prednisolone with the arthritis medication indomethacin found both drugs offered a similar degree of pain reduction. And while indomethacin (Indocin) appeared to cause more minor side effects, neither treatment prompted serious complications, the researchers said. Smaller investigations have pointed in the same direction, said study lead author Dr. Timothy Rainer, a professor of emergency medicine at Cardiff University in Wales. But because the new findings are the product of a "larger and better-designed" effort, Rainer said steroid pills may gain standing among gout experts who usually stick with NSAIDs as their first-line treatment. The bottom line is that there are choices, said Dr. Philip ... Read more

Related support groups: Gout, Prednisolone, Indomethacin, Pred Forte, Gout - Acute, Indocin, Orapred, Omnipred, Gouty Arthritis, Prelone, Econopred, Econopred Plus, Pred Mild, Uric Acid Nephrolithiasis, Prednisol, Predalone 50, Gout - Prophylaxis, Blephamide, AK-Cide, PediaPred

Calcium Supplements Tied to Kidney Stone Risk in Study

Posted 13 Oct 2015 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Oct. 13, 2015 – People with a history of kidney stones may have a higher risk of recurrence if they use calcium supplements, a new study finds. The findings, based on records from more than 2,000 patients, add to evidence linking calcium supplements to kidney stone risk. But researchers also said that people taking calcium under a doctor's advice should not stop on their own. "We're definitely not advocating that people stop taking calcium supplements if their doctor prescribed them for their bone health," said Christopher Loftus, the lead researcher on the study and an M.D. candidate at the Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine. Loftus is scheduled to present his findings next month at the American Society of Nephrology's annual meeting in San Diego. Data and conclusions presented at meetings should be considered preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed medical ... Read more

Related support groups: Kidney Infections, Tums, Caltrate, Calcium Carbonate, Arthritis Pain Formula, Pepcid Complete, Rolaids, Caltrate 600 with D, Oyster, Titralac, Oyster Shell, Pyelonephritis, Titralac Plus, Os-Cal, Citracal + D, Os-Cal 500, Os-Cal 500 with D, Calcium/Vitamin D, Citracal Petites, Slow-Mag

Drug May Ease Passage When Kidney Stone Strikes

Posted 29 Jul 2015 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, July 29, 2015 – Kidney stones can quickly cause extreme pain, and passing the stones is the immediate goal for patients. Now, a new study finds that the drug tamsulosin (Flomax) can boost the passage of large kidney stones, but not small ones. "Small stones usually pass on their own, so it's not too surprising that drug therapy did not help in this study," said Dr. Warren Bromberg, chief of urology at Northern Westchester Hospital in Mt. Kisco, N.Y. On the other hand, "anything that assists in passing a large stone, which otherwise would lead to prolonged pain and surgical intervention, is well worth it," said Bromberg, who was not involved in the new research. The study was led by Jeremy Furyk of Townsville Hospital in Queensland, Australia. His team found that 28 days after visiting an emergency department for any size of kidney stone, 87 percent of patients treated with ... Read more

Related support groups: Flomax, Tamsulosin, Jalyn, Dutasteride/tamsulosin, Calcium Oxalate Calculi with Hyperuricosuria

For Women, No Link Between Kidney Stones, Osteoporosis

Posted 28 Jul 2015 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, July 28, 2015 – Kidney or bladder stones do not increase a postmenopausal woman's risk of osteoporosis, a new study finds. "We know in men that if you have a kidney stone, you are more likely to have osteoporosis," said corresponding author Dr. Laura Carbone, chief of rheumatology at the Medical College of Georgia, in Augusta. "We were trying to find out if that is also the case for women. We found that, unlike what has been reported in men, a woman having a kidney stone is not a risk factor for osteoporosis," she explained in a college news release. "However, having one urinary tract stone does put women at increased risk for a second stone," Carbone added. In this study, researchers analyzed data from about 150,000 postmenopausal women in the U.S. National Institutes of Health's Women's Health Initiative study. While there was no link between kidney/bladder stones and ... Read more

Related support groups: Osteoporosis, Prevention of Osteoporosis, Calcium Oxalate Calculi with Hyperuricosuria, Hypercalciuria

Health Tip: Are You at Risk for Kidney Stones?

Posted 23 Jul 2015 by Drugs.com

-- Kidney stones are deposits, most often made of calcium, that form in the kidneys and can be very painful to pass. The American Academy of Family Physicians says risk factors include: Drinking too little water. Having family members who have had kidney stones. Eating a low-fiber, high-salt and high-protein diet. Getting insufficient exercise. Taking certain medications. Being male. Being aged 20 to 70. Read more

Related support groups: Kidney Infections, Hypercalcemia, Pyelonephritis, Calcium Oxalate Calculi with Hyperuricosuria

Health Tip: Know the Signs of Kidney Stones

Posted 11 Jun 2015 by Drugs.com

-- When mineral deposits build up in the kidneys or urinary tract, they're called kidney stones. When they become lodged in these areas, they cause pain ranging from moderate to severe. The American Academy of Family Physicians says symptoms of kidney stones may include: Painful cramps in the side or lower back. Pain that radiates to the abdomen or groin. Nausea, vomiting or fever. Blood in the urine, or cloudy urine. Urinating more often. Read more

Related support groups: Calcium Oxalate Calculi with Hyperuricosuria

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Urinary Tract Stones

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allopurinol, Zyloprim, Aloprim, Lopurin