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Related terms: B-cell Lymphoma, Burkitt's Lymphoma, Burkitt's Tumor, Cancer, Burkitt Lymphoma, High-grade B-cell Lymphoma, Lymphoma, Burkitt, Small non-cleaved cell Lymphoma, Burkitt

DNA Sequencing May Lead to Personalized Cancer Treatment

Posted 9 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 9, 2016 – DNA sequencing may help personalize treatment for people with lymphoma, a new study suggests. By analyzing small bits of DNA in the blood, researchers at Stanford University School of Medicine said they could determine the cancer's subtype. They said they could also identify mutations that might make treatment less effective or worsen a patient's prognosis. The study authors said their findings add to growing evidence that noninvasive, blood-based biopsies may help detect cancer earlier by tracking its evolution. They said this test may also significantly change how the disease is treated. "Now we can identify the subtype of the tumor, watch how it changes over time and begin to tailor our chemotherapy choices based on the presence or absence of specific mutations," said study co-senior author Dr. Ash Alizadeh, an assistant professor of medicine/oncology. ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma, Follicular Lymphoma, Cutaneous T-cell Lymphoma, Hodgkin's Lymphoma, Diagnosis and Investigation, Burkitt Lymphoma, Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma, Mantle Cell Lymphoma, Conjunctival Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue Lymphoma

Immune Therapy Makes Headway Against a Lymphoma

Posted 8 Sep 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Sept. 8, 2016 – Genetically engineered immune cells appear capable of eradicating non-Hodgkin lymphoma when coupled with effective chemotherapy, a new early trial finds. In this experimental therapy, white blood cells known as T-cells are removed from the patient's bloodstream. Then they're genetically modified so they can detect and attack cancerous B-cells, another type of white blood cell in which most types of non-Hodgkin lymphoma occur. One-third of 32 patients treated with the modified T-cells experienced a complete remission of their non-Hodgkin lymphoma. And those pretreated with more aggressive chemotherapy did even better, researchers report. "It's a fantastic step forward," said Susanna Greer, director of clinical research and immunology at the American Cancer Society. "It's been difficult to make a lot of progress in lymphoma, especially in non-Hodgkin lymphoma, ... Read more

Related support groups: Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma, Cutaneous T-cell Lymphoma, Follicular Lymphoma, Diagnosis and Investigation, Burkitt Lymphoma, Waldenström Macroglobulinemia, Mantle Cell Lymphoma, Mycosis Fungoides, Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma

Young Cancer Survivors Often Develop New Malignancies

Posted 6 Oct 2015 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Oct. 6, 2015 – Teen and young adult cancer survivors are at increased risk for other cancers later in life, a new study reveals. Researchers analyzed U.S. National Cancer Institute data on people who survived cancers before age 40. They had the most common types of cancers in that age group: leukemia, lymphoma, testicular, ovarian, thyroid, breast, soft tissue and bone cancers. "This is a patient demographic that has been largely overlooked," said senior study author Dr. Robert Goldsby, a professor of pediatrics at the University of California, San Francisco Benioff Children's Hospital. Over 30 years, nearly 14 percent of the survivors were diagnosed with another, different type of cancer. On average, the second cancer occurred within 15 years. Compared to people in the general population, patients successfully treated for cancer between ages 15 and 39 were nearly 60 percent ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Breast Cancer, Hairy Cell Leukemia, Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML), Lymphoma, Basal Cell Carcinoma, Melanoma, Skin Cancer, Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL), Ovarian Cancer, Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Stomach Cancer, Cutaneous T-cell Lymphoma, Hodgkin's Lymphoma, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Soft Tissue Sarcoma, Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia, Burkitt Lymphoma

Study Finds Big Strides Made in Treating Leukemia, Lymphoma in Past Decade

Posted 24 Nov 2010 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 24 – Clinicians have made remarkable advances in treating blood cancers with bone marrow and blood stem cell transplants in recent years, significantly reducing the risk of treatment-related complications and death, a new study shows. Between the early 1990s and 2007, there was a 41 percent drop in the overall risk of death in an analysis of more than 2,500 patients treated at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Center in Seattle, a leader in the field of blood cancers and other malignancies. Researchers from the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Center, who conducted the study, also noted dramatic decreases in treatment complications such as infection and organ damage. The study was published in the Nov. 24 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine "We have made enormous strides in understanding this very complex procedure and have yielded quite spectacular results," said study senior ... Read more

Related support groups: Hairy Cell Leukemia, Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML), Lymphoma, Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL), Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Cutaneous T-cell Lymphoma, Follicular Lymphoma, Hodgkin's Lymphoma, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia, Burkitt Lymphoma, Acute Nonlymphocytic Leukemia, Chronic Eosinophilic Leukemia, Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia, Infection Prophylaxis, Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia, Conjunctival Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue Lymphoma, Meningeal Leukemia

Cancer Drug Seems to Work by Activating Virus

Posted 25 Apr 2010 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, April 23 – The cancer drug cyclophosphamide activates a viral infection that helps anti-viral medications eliminate a virus-linked cancer, says a new study. The drug is used to treat Burkitt lymphoma, an aggressive, fast-growing type of non-Hodgkin lymphoma that often occurs in children. In Africa, the cancer is caused by the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), which typically remains dormant inside tumor cells. This study of 21 patients, ages 5 to 15, who were being treated with cyclophosphamide, found that the drug triggers an active EBV infection. Increased replication of the virus in cancer cells makes the cells more susceptible to antiviral drugs, which kill cells containing the replicating virus. The study was published in the April issue of the journal Clinical Cancer Research. "What we have learned from this work is a potential means of capitalizing on presence of viral genomes ... Read more

Related support groups: Cytoxan, Cyclophosphamide, Burkitt Lymphoma, Neosar, Cytoxan Lyophilized

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