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Can You 'Om' Your Way to a Healthy Heart?

Posted 28 Sep 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Sept. 28, 2017 – Meditation may help reduce some risk factors for heart disease, according to a new statement from the American Heart Association. The statement, released Thursday, also noted that a healthy lifestyle and medicines to control high blood pressure, high cholesterol and other heart threats are the most effective ways to prevent heart disease. "Although studies of meditation suggest a possible benefit on cardiovascular risk, there hasn't been enough research to conclude it has a definite role," said Dr. Glenn Levine, chair of the statement writing group. Levine and his colleagues reviewed studies on common types of sitting meditation, such as Zen meditation, Raja yoga and transcendental meditation, and their effects on heart disease risk factors. The investigators concluded that these types of meditation may be associated with decreased stress, anxiety and ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Hypertension, Amlodipine, Losartan, High Cholesterol, Benicar, Diovan, Diltiazem, Lasix, Norvasc, Verapamil, Furosemide, Nifedipine, Cozaar, Valsartan, Micardis, Cardizem, Minoxidil, Avapro, Atacand

Patient's Education Level May Be Key to Heart Risk

Posted 12 Jun 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, June 12, 2017 – How far people go in school seems to be linked to their odds for heart disease, new research suggests. A team led by Dr. Yasuhiko Kubota, of the University of Minnesota, tracked data from nearly 14,000 white and black Americans, followed from 1987 through 2013. For men, the risk of cardiovascular disease – coronary heart disease, heart failure and stroke – between ages 45 to 85 ranged from 59 percent for those with a grade school education, to 42 percent for those who'd earned a graduate degree. Among women, nearly 51 percent of those with a grade school education had heart disease, compared to just 28 percent of those who'd completed graduate school, the findings showed. The study couldn't prove a cause-and-effect relationship, but Kubota's team noted that the finding remained even after they adjusted for other factors, such as income, occupation or how well ... Read more

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Many People Don't Take Their High Blood Pressure Meds: Study

Posted 7 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, March 6, 2017 – Only 20 percent of patients seeking care for stubborn high blood pressure take all the medicine they're supposed to, a new Dutch study finds. "Another 20 percent are not taking any of their blood pressure medications," study senior author Dr. Peter Blankestijn said in an American Heart Association news release. As a result, patients sought care for a condition they could have addressed by simply following their doctor's orders, the findings suggested. "People mistakenly thought to have resistant hypertension – which is high blood pressure despite taking three or more medications – end up seeing specialists and undergoing extra tests because we don't understand why they are so difficult to treat," said Blankestijn. He is a professor of nephrology and hypertension at the University Medical Center Utrecht in the Netherlands. The researchers didn't set out to ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Lisinopril, Hypertension, Metoprolol, Amlodipine, Atenolol, Hydrochlorothiazide, Spironolactone, Diltiazem, Lasix, Bystolic, Norvasc, Verapamil, Furosemide, Ramipril, Bisoprolol, Nifedipine, Enalapril, Cardizem, Benazepril

Calcium Buildup in Young Arteries May Signal Heart Attack Risk

Posted 8 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 8, 2017 – Young adults with any amount of calcified plaque in their arteries are already at risk of a heart attack, a new study finds. Among those 32 to 46 years old, even a little calcified plaque – called atherosclerosis, or hardening of the arteries – can boost the odds for fatal or nonfatal heart disease fivefold over the next 12 years, researchers found. "Heart disease really begins in adolescence and early adulthood," said lead researcher Dr. Jeffrey Carr. Carr is a professor of radiology, biomedical informatics and cardiovascular medicine at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tenn. For the study, CT scans, which can detect these potentially deadly blockages, were performed on more than 3,000 participants whose average age was 40. Just a small amount of plaque increased the risk of heart attack over the next decade by 10 percent, regardless of other risk ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Obesity, Lisinopril, Hypertension, Metoprolol, Smoking, Heart Disease, Atenolol, Losartan, Ischemic Stroke, High Cholesterol, Heart Attack, Propranolol, Benicar, Diovan, Heart Failure, Spironolactone, Congestive Heart Failure, Lasix, Bystolic

Too Many Americans Have High Blood Pressure, Doctors Warn

Posted 7 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Feb. 7, 2017 – A group of family physicians warns that too many Americans struggle with high blood pressure. High blood pressure is a major risk factor for heart attack and heart failure, said Dr. John Meigs Jr., president of the American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP). Since February is National Heart Month, now is a good time for people to get their blood pressure under control and treated so they can avoid heart disease, Meigs said. A 2016 survey by the AAFP and data from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention show that 29 percent of Americans (75 million people) have high blood pressure, and only 54 percent have it under control. "This finding is concerning because we know that high blood pressure and heart attacks or chronic heart failure are so closely related," Meigs said in an AAFP news release. "According to the CDC, seven out of 10 people who have a ... Read more

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Know Your Heart's Numbers

Posted 7 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Feb. 7, 2017 – More than two-thirds of Americans fret about heart disease, but few know the specific information that can help them boost their heart health, a new survey finds. "Studies have suggested the majority of coronary artery disease events can be prevented by addressing treatable risk factors," said Dr. Steve Nissen, chair of cardiovascular medicine at the Cleveland Clinic. "That means, a little knowledge regarding your 'numbers' could go a long way to helping keep your heart healthy and avoiding future problems," he added in a clinic news release. Treatable risk factors for heart disease include blood pressure, cholesterol, body mass index (BMI - an estimate of body fat based on height and weight), waist circumference, blood sugar and weight. The telephone survey of just over 1,000 adults, aged 18 and older, found that 68 percent were worried about heart disease. But ... Read more

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ER Doctor Offers Tips for Safer Snow Shoveling

Posted 31 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Jan. 30, 2017 – If you're a middle-aged couch potato, shoveling snow could put you at risk for a heart attack. While shoveling isn't dangerous for many people, certain people are at higher risk. The American Heart Association (AHA) recommends that people should check with a doctor first if they don't get regular exercise, have a medical condition or are middle-aged or older. If you must shovel, know the symptoms of a heart attack. Symptoms include: pain in the chest, arm(s), back, neck, jaw or stomach; a cold sweat; shortness of breath; nausea; lightheadedness; and uncomfortable pressure, squeezing, fullness in the center of your chest. "If you are concerned that you may be having a heart attack, you should not hesitate about seeking medical treatment – every minute is crucial when experiencing a heart attack," said Dr. George Becker. He is director of the emergency department ... Read more

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Soft Robotic Sleeve Shows Promise for Failing Hearts

Posted 18 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 18, 2017 – Scientists are reporting some early success with a "soft robotic" device aimed at treating advanced heart failure. The hope, the researchers said, is to improve upon ventricular assist devices, or VADs, that are currently used for severe heart failure. The new device has been tested only on pig hearts – so there is a long way to go yet, the study authors said. It will likely be a few years before the device could be used in humans, according to researcher Ellen Roche. She is a biomedical engineer who led the study at Harvard University. But if the device pans out, it could be used in the same way that VADs are now, said Roche. She's currently with the National University of Ireland in Galway. VADs are implantable pumps that help the heart's lower chambers send blood to the body. The devices are sometimes used to manage advanced heart failure – a chronic ... Read more

Related support groups: Lisinopril, Heart Failure, Congestive Heart Failure, Lasix, Furosemide, Ramipril, Enalapril, Benazepril, Perindopril, Left Ventricular Dysfunction, Quinapril, Zestril, Vasotec, Organ Transplant, Bumetanide, Lotensin, Altace, Captopril, Accupril, Bumex

Fewer Drugs in Pipeline to Treat World's No. 1 Killer

Posted 29 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Aug. 29, 2016 – Heart disease remains the world's leading cause of death, but development of drugs to treat it has slowed, a new study reveals. The percentage of heart drugs in clinical trials declined from 1990 through 2012, an analysis of pharmaceutical research and development projects found. Over that time period, 347 heart drugs entered clinical trials, most of them to treat high blood pressure, prevent clotting and lower lipid levels (such as cholesterol) in the blood. Clinical trials are done in a series of steps called phases, each intended to answer different questions about drugs' safety and effectiveness. Between 1990 and 1995, heart drugs made up 108 of 679 (16 percent) of phase 1 trials. That compared with 125 of 2,366 (5 percent) between 2005 and 2012, the researchers said. Phase 1 is the earliest stage of testing. Among later-stage, phase 3 trials, heart drugs ... Read more

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Heat Waves Are Health Threats

Posted 3 Jul 2016 by Drugs.com

SATURDAY, July 2, 2016 – Heat waves are more than uncomfortable, they can be deadly. That's especially true in large cities. And, seniors, children and people with chronic health problems are at higher risk for heat-related illness and death, according to Dr. Robert Glatter. He's an emergency physician at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City. "Those who have high blood pressure, heart disease, diabetes, kidney disease, as well as those who suffer with mental illness, may be at risk for heat-related emergencies, including heat cramps, heat syncope (fainting), heat exhaustion, as well as heat stroke," he said in a hospital news release. "Various classes of medications including beta blockers, as well as diuretics, can impair sweating – ultimately disrupting the body's ability to cool itself. Other medications including antihistamines, as well as antidepressants and sedatives, may also ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Anxiety, High Blood Pressure, Diabetes, Type 2, Lexapro, Zoloft, Cymbalta, Effexor, Prozac, Major Depressive Disorder, Celexa, Hypertension, Citalopram, Paxil, Sertraline, Metoprolol, Social Anxiety Disorder, Pristiq, Amitriptyline, Venlafaxine

Common Heart Drug Might Dampen Some Autism Symptoms

Posted 11 Dec 2012 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Dec. 11 – A medication typically prescribed to control high blood pressure that's commonly referred to as a water pill may ease some of the symptoms of autism, researchers say. That's especially true for people who have milder forms of the disorder, the new research indicates. "Bumetanide is a promising novel therapeutic agent to treat autism," wrote the study's authors, who were quick to point out that this treatment is not a cure for autism and that larger trials need to be done to determine who would benefit most from this treatment. Results of the study appear online Dec. 11 in the journal Translational Psychiatry. Autism is a developmental disorder that results in communication problems, social difficulties, repetitive behaviors and restricted interests, according to background information in the study. The exact cause of the disorder isn't yet known, though genetic and ... Read more

Related support groups: Autism, Bumetanide, Bumex

Fainting Spells Often Tied to Too Many Meds at Once: Study

Posted 4 Nov 2012 by Drugs.com

SUNDAY, Nov. 4 – Taking too many medications at the same time could lead to repeated fainting episodes, a new study reveals. "Simply stated, the more antihypertensive pills a patient takes, the greater the likelihood of a possible fainting spell under certain circumstances," explained one cardiologist, Dr. David Friedman, chief of Heart Failure Services at North Shore-LIJ's Plainview Hospital in Plainview, N.Y. He was not involved in the new research. In the study, Danish researchers led by Dr. Martin Ruwald of Copenhagen University Hospital Gentofte looked at more than 127,000 patients, median age 64, who were hospitalized for fainting between 1997 and 2009. Of those patients, more than one-fifth had experienced at least two fainting episodes. The researchers found that the risk of repeat fainting rose with the number of medications that patients were taking at the same time. For ... Read more

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Accidental Medication Poisonings in Kids on the Rise

Posted 16 Sep 2011 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Sept. 16 – Despite ongoing prevention efforts, a growing number of young children are being accidentally poisoned with medications, according to new research. The study, which was based on data reported to the American Association of Poison Control Centers between 2001 and 2008, found that medication poisoning among children aged 5 and under increased by 22 percent, although the number of children in the United States in this age group rose by only 8 percent during the study period. "The problem of pediatric poisoning in the U.S. is getting worse, not better," Dr. Randall Bond, of Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, said in a hospital news release. In conducting the study, which is scheduled for publication in the Journal of Pediatrics, the researchers reviewed information on over 544,000 children who landed in the emergency department due to medication poisoning ... Read more

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