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Related terms: Stress Cardiomyopathy

Marijuana Use Tied to Rare, Temporary Heart Malfunction

Posted 19 days ago by Drugs.com

SUNDAY, Nov. 13, 2016 – Marijuana use might raise the risk of a rare, temporary heart muscle malfunction that can feel like a full-fledged heart attack, a new study suggests. People who used marijuana were almost twice as likely as non-users to suffer a bout of stress cardiomyopathy, a condition also known as takotsubo, said study co-author Dr. Amitoj Singh. He is chief cardiology fellow at St. Luke's University Health Network in Bethlehem, Pa. Further, pot users experiencing takotsubo were more likely to suffer a cardiac arrest or require an implanted defibrillator, compared with non-users with takotsubo, Singh said. Cardiac arrest is when the heart suddenly stops beating. "Marijuana does not appear to be entirely safe, as some of the lobbyists for marijuana are arguing," Singh said. But the study did not prove that pot causes takotsubo. Singh was to present his findings Sunday at the ... Read more

Related support groups: Dyspnea, Cardiomyopathy, Cannabis, Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy, Restrictive Cardiomyopathy, Idiopathic Hypertrophic Subaortic Stenosis, Cardiomyopathy Prophylaxis, Broken Heart Syndrome

Why Women Should Lower Their Holiday Stress Level

Posted 23 Nov 2015 by Drugs.com

SUNDAY, Nov. 22, 2015 – The stress of making holiday time a happy time can put women at risk for heart problems, an expert warns. The pressure of tasks like cooking, buying presents, and organizing family gatherings can lead to stress that can damage their hearts, according to Dr. Karla Kurrelmeyer, a cardiologist with Houston Methodist Hospital's Heart and Vascular Center. "We have seen more than a few cases of stress-induced cardiomyopathy around the holidays. This occurs when women are under great amounts of stress for a short period of time and that stress is compounded with another traumatic event, such as a death in the family, a car accident, loss of money, etc. If it is ignored, it can be fatal," she said in a hospital news release. Stress-induced cardiomyopathy occurs when stress hormones weaken the left ventricle, the heart's main pumping chamber. The condition is most common ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety, Anxiety and Stress, Lisinopril, Metoprolol, Atenolol, Propranolol, Bystolic, Carvedilol, Ramipril, Bisoprolol, Coreg, Enalapril, Benazepril, Inderal, Sotalol, Toprol-XL, Lopressor, Timolol, Nadolol, Perindopril

Traumatic Life Events May Harm Women's Hearts, Study Suggests

Posted 29 Apr 2015 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, April 29, 2015 – Middle-aged and older women who experience a life-threatening illness or the death of a loved one may face a 65 percent increased risk of heart attack, a new study suggests. And having a history of money problems might double the heart attack risk, the study authors added. Such traumatic events can increase a woman's stress levels to the point where her heart health may be harmed, the researchers explained. "Our results suggest that even a single traumatic life event that could have occurred in the distant or recent past might be akin to some elements of post-traumatic stress conditions that have negative heart impact, and thus strengthens the case for routine assessment of psychological factors as part of heart attack risk assessment in women," said lead researcher Dr. Michelle Albert. She is a professor of medicine at the University of California, San ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety and Stress, Heart Disease, Heart Attack, Myocardial Infarction, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Cardiovascular Conditions and Disorders, Broken Heart Syndrome

Tragedies Do Cause Broken Hearts, Study Suggests

Posted 27 Mar 2014 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, March 27, 2014 – The stress of natural disasters can break people's hearts, according to a new study. Researchers found dramatic rises in "broken heart syndrome" in Vermont after a huge storm ravaged the state and in Missouri after a massive tornado. People with broken heart syndrome – formally called Takotsubo cardiomyopathy – suffer a temporary enlargement and weakening of the heart. The condition is often triggered by extreme emotional or physical stress, such as losing a loved one or being in a traffic crash. "Despite the seemingly increasing number of natural disasters we have, there is limited data about how it might affect the heart," said lead investigator Dr. Sadip Pant, an internist at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences. "Our findings suggest two disasters – one in Vermont and one in Missouri – might have been possible triggers for the clustering of ... Read more

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Grief Is a Real Heartbreaker, Study Finds

Posted 9 Jan 2012 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Jan. 9 – There really is such a thing as heartbreaking grief, suggests new research that finds losing a loved one can increase the risk of heart attack. Within a day of a significant other's death, heart attack risk was 21 times higher than normal, said researchers who looked at data on nearly 2,000 heart attack patients. And within the first week after death, the heart attack risk for the bereaved was still six times greater than usual. "Extreme grief can trigger heart attacks," said lead researcher Dr. Murray Mittleman, director of the Cardiovascular Epidemiology Research Unit at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School in Boston. "For at least a month the risk remains elevated and likely stays up even longer," he added. The stress and anxiety of losing someone close can trigger heart-damaging biological processes, Mittleman explained. "All of this can ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Attack, Myocardial Infarction, Broken Heart Syndrome

Women More Prone to 'Broken Heart' Syndrome: Study

Posted 16 Nov 2011 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 16 – Broken heart syndrome – a temporary heart condition brought on by extreme physical or emotional stress – occurs overwhelmingly in women compared to men, a new study suggests. Whether preceded by the sudden death of a loved one, a frightening medical diagnosis, a car accident or even a surprise party, the phenomenon is 7.5 times more common in females, and women older than 55 are 2.9 times more likely to develop broken heart syndrome than younger women, the researchers found. "We don't really know what causes it, but it's with people who present with symptoms of a heart attack that often occurs with a very stressful situation," said Dr. Stacey Rosen, associate chair of cardiology at the Long Island Jewish Medical Center in New Hyde Park, N.Y. "We know women get all forms of heart disease differently than men do. Whether this is an external effect on the heart ... Read more

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'Broken Heart Syndrome' May Affect More People Than Thought

Posted 19 Jul 2011 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, July 19 – "Broken heart syndrome" – a temporary form of acute heart failure caused by a sudden weakening of the heart muscle – may affect more people than previously thought, a new study suggests. This condition, also known as "stress cardiomyopathy," usually affects postmenopausal women and is typically triggered by a profoundly stressful event, such as a break-up, domestic abuse or the unexpected death of a loved one. In this study, however, researchers found this condition may also develop in younger people, men and even those who cannot identify an a precipitating stressful event. Researchers analyzed 256 stress cardiomyopathy patients in seven tertiary care centers in both Europe and North America over the course of five years. The vast majority (81 percent) of the study's participants were postmenopausal women; 8 percent were 50 or younger, and men accounted for 11 ... Read more

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