Skip to Content

Join the 'Body Imaging' group to help and get support from people like you.

Body Imaging News

Blood Test May Spot Lung Cancer's Return, Even Before Scans

Posted 6 days ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, March 20, 2017 – A blood test can detect the return of lung cancer months before CT and PET scans, a new study suggests. The research included 48 adults with stage 2 or 3 locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The patients were aged 31 to 84. All were treated with chemotherapy and radiation. Blood samples were taken before treatment, during treatment, and at six different times during the two years following treatment. The blood samples were checked for increased levels of circulating tumor cells, the researchers said. The blood tests were able to detect lung cancer recurrence an average of six months before CT and PET scans, the investigators found. The study was presented March 16 at a meeting of the American Society for Radiation Oncology, in San Francisco. Research presented at meetings should be viewed as preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed ... Read more

Related support groups: Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Diagnosis and Investigation, Body Imaging

Higher Spending by Docs May Not Buy Better Health

Posted 13 days ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, March 13, 2017 – Just because your doctor orders more – or more high-priced – tests and procedures when you're in the hospital doesn't mean that you get better care, a new study suggests. Medicare patients treated by higher-spending physicians are just as likely to be re-admitted or die within 30 days of being admitted to the hospital as patients treated by doctors who order fewer or less-expensive tests and treatments, the study revealed. "Spending more doesn't always mean you get better health," senior study author Dr. Anupam Jena, of Harvard Medical School, said in a statement. Health care spending in the United States varies widely from one region to the next, and even across hospitals within the same community, studies have shown. However, this new analysis is believed to be the first to assess spending differences between physicians within the same hospital, and patient ... Read more

Related support groups: Hip Replacement, Diagnosis and Investigation, Body Imaging, Head Imaging

Diagnostic Mammograms Find More Cancers, and More False-Positives

Posted 28 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Feb. 28, 2017 – Thanks to high-tech imaging, mammograms ordered when breast cancer is suspected are catching more tumors – but the percentage of false alarms is up, too, a new study finds. These so-called diagnostic mammograms are performed because of certain symptoms or other suspicious findings. They are not the same as routine screening mammograms, said the study's lead author, Brian Sprague. The new study found the breast cancer detection rate rose to nearly 35 per 1,000 diagnostic mammograms from 2007 to 2013. That's up from 25 per 1,000 noted in a 2005 report from the Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium. This higher detection rate probably reflects the switch from film to digital technology, which permits identification of smaller lesions, said Sprague. He is associate professor of surgery at the University of Vermont College of Medicine. "About 99 percent" of exams ... Read more

Related support groups: Breast Cancer, Breast Cancer - Adjuvant, Breast Cancer, Prevention, Diagnosis and Investigation, Body Imaging

MRIs Can Be Safe for People With Heart Devices …

Posted 23 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 22, 2017 – People with pacemakers or implantable defibrillators have long been told they can't undergo MRI scans. But a new study suggests that it can be safely done – under the right conditions. The study, published in the Feb. 23 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine, focused on patients with standard heart devices not designed to be MRI-compatible. The study found that even for them, an MRI can be safely performed, when a specific protocol is followed. "I think this really opens a door for these patients to have an MRI when medically indicated," said lead researcher Dr. Robert Russo, of the Scripps Research Institute, in La Jolla, Calif. The big caveat, though, is that patients in the study were all screened and went through a specific protocol. An expert in cardiac devices – a doctor, physician's assistant or nurse practitioner – had to be present during ... Read more

Related support groups: Cardiac Arrhythmia, Heart Block, Ischemic Heart Disease, Body Imaging

Experimental Test Can Spot Autism in Infancy

Posted 15 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 15, 2017 – In what they call a first, researchers say they can predict whether some infants under the age of 1 will actually develop autism in their second year. The new experimental technique, using standard brain screening, is designed to focus solely on newborns known to be at high risk for autism because they have an older sibling who has it. But the diagnostic breakthrough addresses a key problem that has confounded efforts to effectively screen for autism as quickly as possible: Babies typically don't show clear outward signs of the disorder until nearly the end of their second year of life. By using scans to peek into the shifting size, surface area and thickness of certain parts of a baby's cerebral cortex as a baby hits the 6-month and 12-month mark, investigators found that they could forecast autism risk with 90 percent accuracy. "These findings suggest a ... Read more

Related support groups: Autism, Asperger Syndrome, Diagnosis and Investigation, Body Imaging, Head Imaging

Many Women Skip Mammograms After False-Positive Result

Posted 9 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Feb. 9, 2017 – The trauma of receiving a false-positive result from a mammogram may lead many women to delay or skip their next screening, a new study finds. A false-positive result means that an aberration on a mammogram looks like it might be cancer. But after tests – such as added imaging or biopsy – it turns out to be benign. In the meantime, however, the patient may go through distress and various procedures, and decide to delay or skip her next mammogram. That's a potentially fatal mistake, breast cancer experts said, because detecting tumors early can save lives. "Unfortunately, for women over age 50, just skipping a mammogram every other year would miss up to 30 percent of cancers," said Dr. Stefanie Zalasin, a breast imaging specialist who reviewed the new findings. "Reassuring a patient that the overwhelming majority of mammograms and even biopsies are normal can ... Read more

Related support groups: Breast Cancer, Breast Cancer, Metastatic, Breast Cancer, Prevention, Diagnosis and Investigation, Breast Cancer - Palliative, Osteolytic Bone Metastases of Breast Cancer, Body Imaging

Is It Parkinson's or Something Else? Blood Test Might Tell

Posted 9 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 8, 2017 – Measuring a particular blood protein might help doctors easily distinguish Parkinson's disease from some similar disorders, a new study suggests. The potential blood test is "not ready for prime time," Parkinson's disease experts said. But, it marks progress in the quest for an objective way to diagnose Parkinson's and similar conditions known as atypical parkinsonian disorders, they noted. Parkinson's disease is a movement disorder that affects nearly 1 million people in the United States alone, according to the Parkinson's Disease Foundation. The root cause is unclear, but as the disease progresses, the brain loses cells that produce dopamine – a chemical that regulates movement. As a result, people suffer symptoms such as tremors, stiff limbs, and balance and coordination problems that gradually worsen over time. Right now, there is no blood test, brain ... Read more

Related support groups: Sinemet, Levodopa, Carbidopa/Levodopa, Stalevo, Sinemet CR, Diagnosis and Investigation, Rytary, Stalevo 100, Parkinsonism, Stalevo 200, Parcopa, Carbidopa/Entacapone/Levodopa, Body Imaging, Atamet, Larodopa, Duopa, Stalevo 75, Stalevo 150, Dopar, Stalevo 50

Calcium Buildup in Young Arteries May Signal Heart Attack Risk

Posted 8 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 8, 2017 – Young adults with any amount of calcified plaque in their arteries are already at risk of a heart attack, a new study finds. Among those 32 to 46 years old, even a little calcified plaque – called atherosclerosis, or hardening of the arteries – can boost the odds for fatal or nonfatal heart disease fivefold over the next 12 years, researchers found. "Heart disease really begins in adolescence and early adulthood," said lead researcher Dr. Jeffrey Carr. Carr is a professor of radiology, biomedical informatics and cardiovascular medicine at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tenn. For the study, CT scans, which can detect these potentially deadly blockages, were performed on more than 3,000 participants whose average age was 40. Just a small amount of plaque increased the risk of heart attack over the next decade by 10 percent, regardless of other risk ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Obesity, Lisinopril, Hypertension, Metoprolol, Smoking, Heart Disease, Atenolol, Ischemic Stroke, Losartan, High Cholesterol, Heart Attack, Propranolol, Benicar, Diovan, Heart Failure, Spironolactone, Congestive Heart Failure, Bystolic, Lasix

Astronaut Twins Give Clues to Health Hazards of Spaceflight

Posted 2 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Feb. 2, 2017 – Long-term space flight appears to trigger a number of genetic and biological changes in astronauts, according to preliminary results from a NASA study. Researchers compared astronaut Scott Kelly, who returned home last March after nearly a year aboard the International Space Station, and his identical twin Mark, a retired astronaut. Mark remained on Earth during that time. "Ten researchers are sharing biological samples taken from each twin before, during and after Scott's mission," according to a NASA news release. The goal of the NASA Twins Study is to learn more about how extended time in space affects the body. According to the report, Scott had altered levels of lipids (an indication of inflammation), and the telomeres on the ends of chromosomes in his white blood cells increased in length while he was in space. However, the telomeres started to shorten ... Read more

Related support groups: High Cholesterol, Diagnosis and Investigation, Body Imaging

Breast Density May Be Leading Indicator of Cancer Risk

Posted 2 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Feb. 2, 2017 – Women whose breasts are predominantly made up of more dense, glandular tissue face higher odds for breast cancer, a new study finds. The researchers added that, based on their study of 200,000 women, breast density may be the most important gauge of breast cancer risk, eclipsing family history of the disease and other risk factors. "The most significant finding in this study is the impact of breast density on development of breast cancer in the population," said study senior author Dr. Karla Kerlikowske. She is a researcher in the department of epidemiology and biostatistics at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF). Still, not everyone is convinced that breast tissue density is the preeminent risk factor for breast cancer. Dr. Kristin Byrne is chief of breast imaging at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City. She believes that the numbers in the ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Breast Cancer, Tamoxifen, Breast Cancer, Metastatic, Breast Cancer, Prevention, Diagnosis and Investigation, Breast Cancer - Palliative, Fibrocystic Breast Disease, Body Imaging, Tamoxifen Hexal, Nolvadex, Tamosin, Emblon, Soltamox, Tamone, Tamoxen, Genox, Nolvadex D, Tamofen

Gene Discoveries Offer New Height Insights

Posted 1 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 1, 2017 – Dozens of newly identified gene variants may have a major influence on height, British researchers say. "The new genetic variants we found are rare in the population but their large effects on human height have revealed important new insights into human skeletal growth," said Panos Deloukas, senior co-lead author of a new report on the genes. He's a professor at Queen Mary University of London. The identified genes will be helpful in predicting a person's risk of developing certain growth disorders, Deloukas said in a university news release. Hundreds of gene variants that affect height by less than 1 millimeter had already been pinpointed. But, the 83 newly identified gene variants can result in differences of up to 2 centimeters – about three-quarters of an inch. That's more than 10 times the average impact of the previously known variants, the researchers ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Diagnosis and Investigation, Body Imaging

Pediatricians Say No to Wearable Smartphone Baby Monitors

Posted 24 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Jan. 24, 2017 – Parents should think twice before buying "smart" clothing with vital signs monitors to keep tabs on their baby's health, pediatricians recommend. A new class of home baby monitor has come to the market. Electronic sensors attached to socks, onesies, buttons and such continually check "vitals" like breathing, pulse rate and oxygen levels. They notify parents of any abnormalities via smartphone. But repeated false alarms from the monitors jangle parents' nerves and lead to unnecessary tests performed on babies, said Dr. Christopher Bonafide. Bonafide is a doctor with the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. He's also lead author of an editorial in the Jan. 24 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA). These baby vital signs monitors have not been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, and there's no evidence the devices prevent ... Read more

Related support groups: Oxygen, Delivery, Premature Labor, Diagnosis and Investigation, Labor Pain, Apnea of Prematurity, Cesarean Section, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy, Body Imaging, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

'Stress Ball' in Your Brain May Be Key to Heart Risks

Posted 12 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 11, 2017 – Doctors have long known that a stressed life does no favors for the heart, and new research may help unravel why that's so. A Harvard team says heightened activity in a key part of the brain may explain why stress boosts people's odds for heart disease and stroke. The finding "raises the possibility that reducing stress could produce benefits that extend beyond an improved sense of psychological well-being," said study lead author Dr. Ahmed Tawakol, who co-directs the cardiac imaging program at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. One neurologist agreed that the research could have real value for patients. "This study provides information that can help us better understand the mechanisms in which the body and the brain affect each other," said Dr. Jeffrey Borenstein. He is president of the Brain & Behavior Foundation in New York City. "A better ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety and Stress, Heart Disease, Ischemic Stroke, Heart Attack, Heart Failure, Congestive Heart Failure, Myocardial Infarction, Left Ventricular Dysfunction, Peripheral Arterial Disease, Intermittent Claudication, Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis, Body Imaging, Post MI Syndrome, Head Imaging

Obamacare Boosts Breast Cancer Screening, Study Finds

Posted 9 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Jan. 9, 2017 – Americans with lower levels of income are less likely to get recommended cancer screenings, but legislation waiving out-of-pocket costs appears to narrow the prevention gap – for mammograms, at least. That's the conclusion of researchers who studied a provision of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), also known as Obamacare, allowing people to obtain certain preventive health services free of charge. The study authors wanted to know: Did the ACA make a difference in Medicare beneficiaries' use of mammograms and colonoscopies to detect breast cancer and colon cancer, respectively? After Obamacare waived out-of-pocket expenses for cancer screenings, disparities between the wealthiest and poorest women in rates of screening mammography closed a bit, the study found. What's more, mammography rates increased by about 20 percent, on average, across all levels of income and ... Read more

Related support groups: Breast Cancer, Breast Cancer, Prevention, Diagnosis and Investigation, Breast Cancer - Palliative, Body Imaging

Minority Women Less Likely to Get Breast Cancer Screening

Posted 16 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Dec. 16, 2016 – Black and Hispanic women are less likely than white women to be screened for breast cancer, a large review finds. Screening rates for Asian/Pacific Islander and white women were similar, the research showed. The analysis of 39 studies including 6 million women was published Dec. 16 in the Journal of the American College of Radiology. "Not only do black and Hispanic women get screened less than white women, but disparities also persist in two age groups: women who are 40 to 65 years old, and 65 and older," study author Dr. Ahmed Ahmed said in a journal news release. "These findings are important; it's evident that more work needs to be done to ensure that all eligible women have access to this preventive screening tool," added Ahmed. He's a postdoctoral fellow researcher at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. A great deal of effort has gone into finding racially ... Read more

Related support groups: Breast Cancer, Breast Cancer, Metastatic, Breast Cancer - Adjuvant, Breast Cancer, Prevention, Breast Cancer - Palliative, Osteolytic Bone Metastases of Breast Cancer, Body Imaging

Page 1 2 3 4 5 Next

Ask a Question

Further Information

Related Condition Support Groups

CNS Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Liver Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Intra-arterial Digital Subtraction Angiography, Intravenous Digital Subtraction Angiography, Diagnosis and Investigation

Related Drug Support Groups

Optiray 320, iohexol, ioversol, Omnipaque 350, Optiray 350, Omnipaque 240, Omnipaque 300, Myelo-Kit, Optiray 300, view more... ioxilan, Oxilan, Oraltag, Optiray 240, Optiray 160, Omnipaque 180 Redi-Unit, Omnipaque 180, Omnipaque 140, Omnipaque 240 Redi-Unit, Omnipaque Flexipak, Omnipaque 210